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The Florida Statutes

The 2019 Florida Statutes

Title XLII
ESTATES AND TRUSTS
Chapter 736
FLORIDA TRUST CODE
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F.S. 736.0108
736.0108 Principal place of administration.
(1) Terms of a trust designating the principal place of administration of the trust are valid only if there is a sufficient connection with the designated jurisdiction. Without precluding other means for establishing a sufficient connection, terms of a trust designating the principal place of administration are valid and controlling if:
(a) A trustee’s principal place of business is located in or a trustee is a resident of the designated jurisdiction; or
(b) All or part of the administration occurs in the designated jurisdiction.
(2) Unless otherwise validly designated in the trust instrument, the principal place of administration of a trust is the trustee’s usual place of business where the records pertaining to the trust are kept or, if the trustee has no place of business, the trustee’s residence. In the case of cotrustees, the principal place of administration is:
(a) The usual place of business of the corporate trustee, if there is only one corporate cotrustee;
(b) The usual place of business or residence of the individual trustee who is a professional fiduciary, if there is only one such person and no corporate cotrustee; or otherwise
(c) The usual place of business or residence of any of the cotrustees as agreed on by the cotrustees.
(3) Notwithstanding any other provision of this section, the principal place of administration of a trust, for which a bank, association, or trust company organized under the laws of this state or bank or savings association organized under the laws of the United States with its main office in this state has been appointed trustee, shall not be moved or otherwise affected solely because the trustee engaged in an interstate merger transaction with an out-of-state bank pursuant to s. 658.2953 in which the out-of-state bank is the resulting bank.
(4) A trustee is under a continuing duty to administer the trust at a place appropriate to its purposes and its administration.
(5) Without precluding the right of the court to order, approve, or disapprove a transfer, the trustee, in furtherance of the duty prescribed by subsection (4), may transfer the trust’s principal place of administration to another state or to a jurisdiction outside of the United States.
(6) The trustee shall notify the qualified beneficiaries of a proposed transfer of a trust’s principal place of administration not less than 60 days before initiating the transfer. The notice of proposed transfer must include:
(a) The name of the jurisdiction to which the principal place of administration is to be transferred.
(b) The address and telephone number at the new location at which the trustee can be contacted.
(c) An explanation of the reasons for the proposed transfer.
(d) The date on which the proposed transfer is anticipated to occur.
(e) The date, not less than 60 days after the notice is provided, by which the qualified beneficiary must notify the trustee of an objection to the proposed transfer.
(7) The authority of a trustee to act under this section without court approval to transfer a trust’s principal place of administration is suspended if a qualified beneficiary files a lawsuit objecting to the proposed transfer on or before the date specified in the notice. The suspension is effective until the lawsuit is dismissed or withdrawn.
(8) In connection with a transfer of the trust’s principal place of administration, the trustee may transfer any of the trust property to a successor trustee designated in the terms of the trust or appointed pursuant to s. 736.0704.
History.s. 1, ch. 2006-217.