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The Florida Statutes

The 2017 Florida Statutes

Title II
STATE ORGANIZATION
Chapter 6
ADMISSION INTO UNION; CONCESSIONS; STATE BOUNDARIES
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CHAPTER 6
TITLE II
STATE ORGANIZATION
CHAPTER 6
ADMISSION INTO UNION; CONCESSIONS; STATE BOUNDARIES
6.01 Assent to terms of admission into the union.
6.02 United States authorized to acquire lands for certain purposes.
6.03 Condemnation of land when price not agreed upon.
6.04 Jurisdiction over such lands; how ceded to the United States.
6.05 Transfer of title and jurisdiction over land owned by state.
6.06 United States may acquire state lands for national forests.
6.07 Congress may legislate concerning state lands acquired for national forests.
6.075 Lands owned or controlled by United States Department of Interior; Governor authorized to cede concurrent jurisdiction to enforce criminal laws.
6.08 Boundary between Florida and Alabama.
6.081 Florida-Alabama boundary redefined.
6.09 Boundary between Florida and Georgia.
6.10 Confirmation of certain grants of Georgia.
6.01 Assent to terms of admission into the union.The State of Florida assents as by the statute approved July 25, 1845, to the terms of admission of this state into the Confederacy and Union of the United States, and to the provisions of the Acts of Congress respecting the public lands of the United States in this state.
History.s. 1, ch. 14, 1845; RS 6; GS 4; RGS 4; CGL 4.
6.02 United States authorized to acquire lands for certain purposes.The United States may purchase, acquire, hold, own, occupy, and possess such lands within the limits of this state as they shall seek to occupy and hold as sites on which to erect and maintain forts, magazines, arsenals, dockyards, and other needful buildings, or any of them, as contemplated and provided in the Constitution of the United States; such land to be acquired either by contract with owners, or in the manner hereinafter provided.
History.s. 1, ch. 25, 1845; RS 7; GS 5; RGS 5; CGL 5.
6.03 Condemnation of land when price not agreed upon.If the officer or other agent employed by the United States to make such purchase and the owner of the land contemplated to be purchased, as aforesaid, cannot agree for the sale and purchase thereof, the same may be acquired by the United States by condemnation in the same manner as is hereinafter provided for condemnation of lands for other public purposes, and any officer or agent authorized by the United States may institute and conduct such proceedings in their behalf.
History.s. 2, ch. 25, 1845; RS 8; GS 6; RGS 6; CGL 6.
6.04 Jurisdiction over such lands; how ceded to the United States.Whenever the United States shall contract for, purchase, or acquire any land within the limits of this state for the purposes aforesaid, in either of the modes above mentioned and provided, or shall hold for such purposes lands heretofore lawfully acquired or reserved therefor, and shall desire to acquire constitutional jurisdiction over such lands for said purposes, the Governor of this state may, upon application made to him or her in writing on behalf of the United States for that purpose, accompanied by the proper evidence of said reservation, purchase, contract, or acquisition of record, describing the land sought to be ceded by convenient metes and bounds, thereupon, in the name and on behalf of this state, cede to the United States exclusive jurisdiction over the land so reserved, purchased, or acquired and sought to be ceded; the United States to hold, use, occupy, own, possess, and exercise said jurisdiction over the same for the purposes aforesaid, and none other whatsoever; provided, always, that the consent aforesaid is hereby given and the cession aforesaid is to be granted and made as aforesaid, upon the express condition that this state shall retain a concurrent jurisdiction with the United States in and over the land or lands so to be ceded, and every portion thereof, so far that all process, civil or criminal, issuing under authority of this state, or of any of the courts or judicial officers thereof may be executed by the proper officers thereof, upon any person amenable to the same, within the limits and extent of lands so ceded, in like manner and to like effect as if this law had never been passed; saving, however, to the United States security to their property within said limits and extent, and exemption of the same, and of said lands from any taxation under the authority of this state while the same shall continue to be owned, held, used, and occupied by the United States for the purposes above expressed and intended, and not otherwise.
History.s. 3, ch. 25, 1845; RS 9; GS 7; RGS 7; CGL 7; s. 2, ch. 95-147.
6.05 Transfer of title and jurisdiction over land owned by state.Whenever a tract of land containing not more than 4 acres shall be selected by an authorized officer or agent of the United States for the bona fide purpose of erecting thereon a lighthouse, beacon, marine hospital, or other public work, and the title to the said land shall be held by the state, then on application by the said officer or agent to the Governor of this state, the said executive may transfer to the United States the title to, and jurisdiction over, said land; provided, always, that the said transfer of title and jurisdiction is to be granted and made, as aforesaid, upon the express condition that this state shall retain a concurrent jurisdiction with the United States, in and over the lands so to be transferred, and every portion thereof, so far that all process, civil or criminal, issuing under authority of this state, or any of the courts or judicial officers thereof, may be executed by the proper officer thereof, upon any person amenable to the same, within the limits and extent of the lands so ceded, in like manner and to like effect as if this law had never been passed; saving, however, to the United States, security to their property within said limits or extent. The said lands shall hereafter remain the property of the United States and be exempt from taxation as long as they shall be needed for said purposes.
History.ss. 1, 2, ch. 630, 1855; RS 10; GS 8; RGS 8; CGL 8.
6.06 United States may acquire state lands for national forests.The consent of the state is given to the acquisition by the United States, by purchase, gift, or condemnation with adequate compensation, of such lands in Florida as in the opinion of the Federal Government may be needed for the establishment, consolidation and extension of national forests in the state; provided, that the state shall retain a concurrent jurisdiction with the United States in and over lands so acquired so far that civil process in all cases, and such criminal process as may issue under the authority of the state against any person charged with the commission of any crime without or within said jurisdiction, may be executed thereon in like manner as if this section had not been passed.
History.s. 1, ch. 8564, 1921; CGL 9.
6.07 Congress may legislate concerning state lands acquired for national forests.Congress may pass such laws and make or provide for the making of such rules and regulations, of both a civil and criminal nature, and provide punishment therefor, as in its judgment may be necessary for the administration, control, and protection of such lands as may be from time to time acquired by the United States under the provisions of s. 6.06.
History.s. 2, ch. 8564, 1921; CGL 10.
6.075 Lands owned or controlled by United States Department of Interior; Governor authorized to cede concurrent jurisdiction to enforce criminal laws.
(1)(a) Whenever the United States Department of the Interior, National Park Service, shall desire to acquire concurrent jurisdiction to enforce criminal laws on any lands owned or controlled by the United States Department of the Interior, National Park Service, within this state and shall make application for that purpose, the Governor is authorized to cede to the United States Department of the Interior, National Park Service, such measure of jurisdiction, not exceeding that requested, as the Governor may deem proper, over all or any part of such lands as to which a cession of the concurrent jurisdiction to enforce criminal laws is requested.
(b) The application on behalf of the United States Department of the Interior, National Park Service, shall state in particular the measure of jurisdiction desired and shall be accompanied by an accurate description of the lands over which such jurisdiction is desired and by information as to which of such lands are then owned or controlled by the United States Department of the Interior, National Park Service.
(c) The cession of jurisdiction shall become effective when it is accepted on behalf of the United States, which acceptance shall be indicated, in writing upon the instrument of cession, by an authorized official of the United States Department of the Interior, National Park Service, and by filing with the Secretary of State of the State of Florida.
(2) The state reserves jurisdiction, for itself and its political subdivisions, to enforce the laws on any lands for which concurrent jurisdiction has been ceded to the United States pursuant to this act. No person residing on such lands shall be deprived of any civil or political rights, including the right of suffrage, by reason of the cession of concurrent jurisdiction to the United States Department of the Interior, National Park Service.
(3)(a) Whenever the United States tenders to the state a relinquishment of all or part of the jurisdiction theretofore acquired by it over lands within this state, the Governor is authorized to accept on behalf of the state the jurisdiction so relinquished; provided, however, that the Governor shall not accept a relinquishment of all or part of such jurisdiction over an Indian tribe recognized by the United States without the consent of its federally recognized tribal governing body.
(b) The Governor shall indicate his or her acceptance of such relinquished jurisdiction by a writing addressed to the head of the appropriate department or agency of the United States, and such acceptance shall be effective when said writing is deposited in the United States mail.
History.ss. 1, 2, 3, ch. 86-67; s. 3, ch. 95-147.
6.08 Boundary between Florida and Alabama.The line commencing on the Chattahoochee River near a place known as “Irwin’s Mills,” and running west to the Perdido, marked throughout by blazes on the trees, and also by mounds of earth thrown upon the line, at distances of 1 mile, more or less, from each other, and commonly known as the “Mound line” or “Ellicott’s line,” and by these names distinguished from another line above, running irregularly at different distances not exceeding one and a half miles from the “Mound line” and marked by blazes only, and known as the “Upper line,” or “Coffee’s line,” is the boundary line between the States of Florida and Alabama.
History.s. 2, ch. 165, 1848; RS 2; GS 2; RGS 2; CGL 2.
6.081 Florida-Alabama boundary redefined.
(1) The middle of the Perdido River at its mouth, as defined by the Constitutions of the States of Alabama and Florida, is at latitude 30°16′53″ N. and longitude 87°31′06″ W. as the control point; the boundary line at the mouth of the Perdido River is fixed, as nearly as may be, in the axis of the mouth of said river, passing through the control point and running north and south and having as its northern terminus a point of latitude 30°17′02″ N. and longitude 87°31′06″ W., and as its southern terminus a point 1,000 feet due south of the control point; from the northern terminus of the boundary line at the mouth of the river, the boundary up the lower portion of said river be a straight line to a point at latitude 30°18′00″ N., longitude 87°27′08″ W., thence by a straight line to a point in the center line of the intracoastal canal at longitude 87°27′00″ W.; the seaward boundary between Florida and Alabama extends from the south end of the boundary line at the mouth of the Perdido River, thence south 0°01′00″ W. to the seaward limit of each respective state; and shall be deemed, taken and declared, and is hereby deemed, taken and declared to be the boundary line between the States of Florida and Alabama, at the mouth of the Perdido River and adjacent thereto, and shall be deemed and taken as such by the authorities and people of this state.
(2) Nothing herein contained, nor any operations of the provisions of this section, shall prejudice the rights or claims of private individuals to any of the lands herein involved whether such rights or claims arise or exist upon the basis that the lands herein defined as being within the boundaries of the State of Alabama were previously a part of the State of Florida or included within the boundaries of the State of Florida or otherwise.
History.ss. 2, 5, ch. 28141, 1953.
Note.Boundary.—Consent given by 68 Stat. 182, May 6, 1954.
6.09 Boundary between Florida and Georgia.
(1) The line run and marked by B. J. Whitner, Jr., on the part of Florida, and G. J. Orr, on the part of Georgia, is the permanent boundary line between the States of Florida and Georgia.
(2) The boundary line between the States of Florida and Georgia as described in subsection (1) herein shall be extended from a point 37 links north of Ellicott’s Mound on the Saint Marys River; thence down said river to the Atlantic Ocean; thence along the middle of the presently existing Saint Marys entrance navigational channel to the point of intersection with a hypothetical line connecting the seawardmost points of the jetties now protecting such channel; thence along said line to a control point of latitude 30°42′45.6″ N., longitude 81°24′15.9″ W.; thence due east to the seaward limit of Florida as now or hereafter fixed by the Congress of the United States; such boundary to be extended on the same true 90° bearing so far as a need for further delimitation may arise.
History.s. 1, ch. 1017, 1859; Resolution No. 16, Feb. 8, 1861; RS 3; GS 3; RGS 3; CGL 3; s. 1, ch. 69-4.
Note.Boundary.—Consent given by 84 Stat. 1094, October 22, 1970.
6.10 Confirmation of certain grants of Georgia.The titles of bona fide holders of land under any grant from the State of Georgia prior to December 22, 1859, in the territory formerly claimed by the said state, which land is within the State of Florida by the line specified in s. 6.09 remain confirmed so far as this state had the right and power to confirm the same as provided by the act of December 22, 1859.
History.s. 2, ch. 1017, 1859; RS 456; GS 645; RGS 1229; CGL 1785.