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The Florida Statutes

The 2014 Florida Statutes

Title XLVIII
K-20 EDUCATION CODE
Chapter 1003
PUBLIC K-12 EDUCATION
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CHAPTER 1003
CHAPTER 1003
PUBLIC K-12 EDUCATION
PART I
GENERAL PROVISIONS
(ss. 1003.01-1003.06)
PART II
SCHOOL ATTENDANCE
(ss. 1003.21-1003.29)
PART III
CONTROL OF STUDENTS
(ss. 1003.31-1003.33)
PART IV
PUBLIC K-12 EDUCATIONAL INSTRUCTION
(ss. 1003.41-1003.4995)
PART V
SPECIALIZED INSTRUCTION FOR CERTAIN PUBLIC K-12 STUDENTS
(ss. 1003.51-1003.58)
PART VI
ACADEMICALLY HIGH-PERFORMING SCHOOL DISTRICTS
(s. 1003.621)
PART I
GENERAL PROVISIONS
1003.01 Definitions.
1003.02 District school board operation and control of public K-12 education within the school district.
1003.03 Maximum class size.
1003.04 Student conduct and parental involvement.
1003.05 Assistance to transitioning students from military families.
1003.06 Classroom placement of multiple birth siblings.
1003.01 Definitions.As used in this chapter, the term:
(1) “District school board” means the members who are elected by the voters of a school district created and existing pursuant to s. 4, Art. IX of the State Constitution to operate and control public K-12 education within the school district.
(2) “School” means an organization of students for instructional purposes on an elementary, middle or junior high school, secondary or high school, or other public school level authorized under rules of the State Board of Education.
(3)(a) “Exceptional student” means any student who has been determined eligible for a special program in accordance with rules of the State Board of Education. The term includes students who are gifted and students with disabilities who have an intellectual disability; autism spectrum disorder; a speech impairment; a language impairment; an orthopedic impairment; an other health impairment; traumatic brain injury; a visual impairment; an emotional or behavioral disability; or a specific learning disability, including, but not limited to, dyslexia, dyscalculia, or developmental aphasia; students who are deaf or hard of hearing or dual sensory impaired; students who are hospitalized or homebound; children with developmental delays ages birth through 5 years, or children, ages birth through 2 years, with established conditions that are identified in State Board of Education rules pursuant to s. 1003.21(1)(e).
(b) “Special education services” means specially designed instruction and such related services as are necessary for an exceptional student to benefit from education. Such services may include: transportation; diagnostic and evaluation services; social services; physical and occupational therapy; speech and language pathology services; job placement; orientation and mobility training; braillists, typists, and readers for the blind; interpreters and auditory amplification; services provided by a certified listening and spoken language specialist; rehabilitation counseling; transition services; mental health services; guidance and career counseling; specified materials, assistive technology devices, and other specialized equipment; and other such services as approved by rules of the state board.
(4) “Career education” means education that provides instruction for the following purposes:
(a) At the elementary, middle, and high school levels, exploratory courses designed to give students initial exposure to a broad range of occupations to assist them in preparing their academic and occupational plans, and practical arts courses that provide generic skills that may apply to many occupations but are not designed to prepare students for entry into a specific occupation. Career education provided before high school completion must be designed to strengthen both occupational awareness and academic skills integrated throughout all academic instruction.
(b) At the secondary school level, job-preparatory instruction in the competencies that prepare students for effective entry into an occupation, including diversified cooperative education, work experience, and job-entry programs that coordinate directed study and on-the-job training.
(c) At the postsecondary education level, courses of study that provide competencies needed for entry into specific occupations or for advancement within an occupation.
(5)(a) “Suspension,” also referred to as out-of-school suspension, means the temporary removal of a student from all classes of instruction on public school grounds and all other school-sponsored activities, except as authorized by the principal or the principal’s designee, for a period not to exceed 10 school days and remanding of the student to the custody of the student’s parent with specific homework assignments for the student to complete.
(b) “In-school suspension” means the temporary removal of a student from the student’s regular school program and placement in an alternative program, such as that provided in s. 1003.53, under the supervision of district school board personnel, for a period not to exceed 10 school days.
(6) “Expulsion” means the removal of the right and obligation of a student to attend a public school under conditions set by the district school board, and for a period of time not to exceed the remainder of the term or school year and 1 additional year of attendance. Expulsions may be imposed with or without continuing educational services and shall be reported accordingly.
(7) “Corporal punishment” means the moderate use of physical force or physical contact by a teacher or principal as may be necessary to maintain discipline or to enforce school rule. However, the term “corporal punishment” does not include the use of such reasonable force by a teacher or principal as may be necessary for self-protection or to protect other students from disruptive students.
(8) “Habitual truant” means a student who has 15 unexcused absences within 90 calendar days with or without the knowledge or consent of the student’s parent, is subject to compulsory school attendance under s. 1003.21(1) and (2)(a), and is not exempt under s. 1003.21(3) or s. 1003.24, or by meeting the criteria for any other exemption specified by law or rules of the State Board of Education. Such a student must have been the subject of the activities specified in ss. 1003.26 and 1003.27(3), without resultant successful remediation of the truancy problem before being dealt with as a child in need of services according to the provisions of chapter 984.
(9) “Dropout” means a student who meets any one or more of the following criteria:
(a) The student has voluntarily removed himself or herself from the school system before graduation for reasons that include, but are not limited to, marriage, or the student has withdrawn from school because he or she has failed the statewide student assessment test and thereby does not receive any of the certificates of completion;
(b) The student has not met the relevant attendance requirements of the school district pursuant to State Board of Education rules, or the student was expected to attend a school but did not enter as expected for unknown reasons, or the student’s whereabouts are unknown;
(c) The student has withdrawn from school, but has not transferred to another public or private school or enrolled in any career, adult, home education, or alternative educational program;
(d) The student has withdrawn from school due to hardship, unless such withdrawal has been granted under the provisions of s. 322.091, court action, expulsion, medical reasons, or pregnancy; or
(e) The student is not eligible to attend school because of reaching the maximum age for an exceptional student program in accordance with the district’s policy.

The State Board of Education may adopt rules to implement the provisions of this subsection.

(10) “Alternative measures for students with special needs” or “special programs” means measures designed to meet the special needs of a student that cannot be met by regular school curricula.
(11)(a) “Juvenile justice education programs or schools” means programs or schools operating for the purpose of providing educational services to youth in Department of Juvenile Justice programs, for a school year comprised of 250 days of instruction distributed over 12 months. At the request of the provider, a district school board may decrease the minimum number of days of instruction by up to 10 days for teacher planning for residential programs and up to 20 days for teacher planning for nonresidential programs, subject to the approval of the Department of Juvenile Justice and the Department of Education.
(b) “Juvenile justice provider” means the Department of Juvenile Justice, the sheriff, or a private, public, or other governmental organization under contract with the Department of Juvenile Justice or the sheriff that provides treatment, care and custody, or educational programs for youth in juvenile justice intervention, detention, or commitment programs.
(12) “Children and youths who are experiencing homelessness,” for programs authorized under subtitle B, Education for Homeless Children and Youths, of Title VII of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, 42 U.S.C. ss. 11431 et seq., means children and youths who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, and includes:
(a) Children and youths who are sharing the housing of other persons due to loss of housing, economic hardship, or a similar reason; are living in motels, hotels, travel trailer parks, or camping grounds due to the lack of alternative adequate accommodations; are living in emergency or transitional shelters; are abandoned in hospitals; or are awaiting foster care placement.
(b) Children and youths who have a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings.
(c) Children and youths who are living in cars, parks, public spaces, abandoned buildings, bus or train stations, or similar settings.
(d) Migratory children who are living in circumstances described in paragraphs (a)-(c).
(13) “Regular school attendance” means the actual attendance of a student during the school day as defined by law and rules of the State Board of Education. Regular attendance within the intent of s. 1003.21 may be achieved by attendance in:
(a) A public school supported by public funds;
(b) A parochial, religious, or denominational school;
(c) A private school supported in whole or in part by tuition charges or by endowments or gifts;
(d) A home education program that meets the requirements of chapter 1002; or
(e) A private tutoring program that meets the requirements of chapter 1002.
(14) “Core-curricula courses” means:
(a) Courses in language arts/reading, mathematics, social studies, and science in prekindergarten through grade 3, excluding extracurricular courses pursuant to subsection (15);
(b) Courses in grades 4 through 8 in subjects that are measured by state assessment at any grade level and courses required for middle school promotion, excluding extracurricular courses pursuant to subsection (15);
(c) Courses in grades 9 through 12 in subjects that are measured by state assessment at any grade level and courses that are specifically identified by name in statute as required for high school graduation and that are not measured by state assessment, excluding extracurricular courses pursuant to subsection (15);
(d) Exceptional student education courses; and
(e) English for Speakers of Other Languages courses.

The term is limited in meaning and used for the sole purpose of designating classes that are subject to the maximum class size requirements established in s. 1, Art. IX of the State Constitution. This term does not include courses offered under ss. 1002.321(4)(e), 1002.33(7)(a)2.b., 1002.37, 1002.45, and 1003.499.

(15) “Extracurricular courses” means all courses that are not defined as “core-curricula courses,” which may include, but are not limited to, physical education, fine arts, performing fine arts, career education, and courses that may result in college credit. The term is limited in meaning and used for the sole purpose of designating classes that are not subject to the maximum class size requirements established in s. 1, Art. IX of the State Constitution.
(16) “Physical education” means the development or maintenance of skills related to strength, agility, flexibility, movement, and stamina, including dance; the development of knowledge and skills regarding teamwork and fair play; the development of knowledge and skills regarding nutrition and physical fitness as part of a healthy lifestyle; and the development of positive attitudes regarding sound nutrition and physical activity as a component of personal well-being.
History.s. 111, ch. 2002-387; s. 1, ch. 2003-391; s. 81, ch. 2004-357; s. 15, ch. 2006-74; s. 2, ch. 2007-28; s. 5, ch. 2008-147; s. 3, ch. 2008-204; s. 6, ch. 2009-164; s. 14, ch. 2011-55; s. 15, ch. 2011-175; s. 10, ch. 2012-133; s. 3, ch. 2013-225; s. 33, ch. 2014-39.
1003.02 District school board operation and control of public K-12 education within the school district.As provided in part II of chapter 1001, district school boards are constitutionally and statutorily charged with the operation and control of public K-12 education within their school district. The district school boards must establish, organize, and operate their public K-12 schools and educational programs, employees, and facilities. Their responsibilities include staff development, public K-12 school student education including education for exceptional students and students in juvenile justice programs, special programs, adult education programs, and career education programs. Additionally, district school boards must:
(1) Provide for the proper accounting for all students of school age, for the attendance and control of students at school, and for proper attention to health, safety, and other matters relating to the welfare of students in the following areas:
(a) Admission, classification, promotion, and graduation of students.Adopt rules for admitting, classifying, promoting, and graduating students to or from the various schools of the district.
(b) Enforcement of attendance laws.Provide for the enforcement of all laws and rules relating to the attendance of students at school. District school boards are authorized to establish policies that allow accumulated unexcused tardies, regardless of when they occur during the school day, and early departures from school to be recorded as unexcused absences. District school boards are also authorized to establish policies that require referral to a school’s child study team for students who have fewer absences than the number required by s. 1003.26(1)(b).
(c) Control of students.
1. Adopt rules for the control, attendance, discipline, in-school suspension, suspension, and expulsion of students and decide all cases recommended for expulsion.
2. Maintain a code of student conduct as provided in chapter 1006.
(d) Courses of study and instructional materials.
1. Provide adequate instructional materials for all students as follows and in accordance with the requirements of chapter 1006, in the core courses of mathematics, language arts, social studies, science, reading, and literature, except for instruction for which the school advisory council approves the use of a program that does not include a textbook as a major tool of instruction.
2. Adopt courses of study for use in the schools of the district.
3. Provide for proper requisitioning, distribution, accounting, storage, care, and use of all instructional materials as may be needed, and ensure that instructional materials used in the district are consistent with the district goals and objectives and the course descriptions approved by the State Board of Education, as well as with the state and school district performance standards required by law and state board rule.
(e) Transportation.Make provision for the transportation of students to the public schools or school activities they are required or expected to attend, efficiently and economically, in accordance with the requirements of chapter 1006, which function may be accomplished, in whole or part, by means of an interlocal agreement under s. 163.01.
(f) Facilities and school plant.
1. Approve and adopt a districtwide school facilities program, in accordance with the requirements of chapter 1013.
2. Approve plans for locating, planning, constructing, sanitating, insuring, maintaining, protecting, and condemning school property as prescribed in chapter 1013.
3. Approve and adopt a districtwide school building program.
4. Select and purchase school sites, playgrounds, and recreational areas located at centers at which schools are to be constructed, of adequate size to meet the needs of projected students to be accommodated.
5. Approve the proposed purchase of any site, playground, or recreational area for which school district funds are to be used.
6. Expand existing sites.
7. Rent buildings when necessary, which function may be accomplished, in whole or part, by means of an interlocal agreement under s. 163.01.
8. Enter into leases or lease-purchase arrangements, in accordance with the requirements and conditions provided in s. 1013.15(2).
9. Provide for the proper supervision of construction.
10. Make or contract for additions, alterations, and repairs on buildings and other school properties.
11. Ensure that all plans and specifications for buildings provide adequately for the safety and well-being of students, as well as for economy of construction.
12. Provide adequately for the proper maintenance and upkeep of school plants, which function may be accomplished, in whole or part, by means of an interlocal agreement under s. 163.01.
13. Carry insurance on every school building in all school plants including contents, boilers, and machinery, except buildings of three classrooms or less which are of frame construction and located in a tenth class public protection zone as defined by the Florida Inspection and Rating Bureau, and on all school buses and other property under the control of the district school board or title to which is vested in the district school board, except as exceptions may be authorized under rules of the State Board of Education.
14. Condemn and prohibit the use for public school purposes of any building under the control of the district school board.
(g) School operation.
1. Provide for the operation of all public schools as free schools for a term of 180 days or the equivalent on an hourly basis as specified by rules of the State Board of Education; determine district school funds necessary in addition to state funds to operate all schools for the minimum term; and arrange for the levying of district school taxes necessary to provide the amount needed from district sources.
2. Prepare, adopt, and timely submit to the Department of Education, as required by law and by rules of the State Board of Education, the annual school budget, so as to promote the improvement of the district school system.
(h) Records and reports.
1. Keep all necessary records and make all needed and required reports, as required by law or by rules of the State Board of Education.
2. At regular intervals require reports to be made by principals or teachers in all public schools to the parents of the students enrolled and in attendance at their schools, apprising them of the academic and other progress being made by the student and giving other useful information.
(i) Parental notification of acceleration options.At the beginning of each school year, notify parents of students in or entering high school of the opportunity and benefits of advanced placement, International Baccalaureate, Advanced International Certificate of Education, dual enrollment, and Florida Virtual School courses and options for early graduation under s. 1003.4281.
(j) Return on investment.Notify the parent of a student who earns an industry certification that articulates for postsecondary credit of the estimated cost savings to the parent before the student’s high school graduation versus the cost of acquiring such certification after high school graduation, which would include the tuition and fees associated with available postsecondary credits. Also, the student and the parent must be informed of any additional industry certifications available to the student.
(2) Require that all laws, all rules of the State Board of Education, and all rules of the district school board are properly enforced.
(3) Maintain a system of school improvement and education accountability as required by law and State Board of Education rule, including but not limited to the requirements of chapter 1008.
(4) In order to reduce the anonymity of students in large schools, adopt policies that encourage subdivision of the school into schools-within-a-school, which shall operate within existing resources. A “school-within-a-school” means an operational program that uses flexible scheduling, team planning, and curricular and instructional innovation to organize groups of students with groups of teachers as smaller units, so as to functionally operate as a smaller school. Examples of this include, but are not limited to:
(a) An organizational arrangement assigning both students and teachers to smaller units in which the students take some or all of their coursework with their fellow grouped students and from the teachers assigned to the smaller unit. A unit may be grouped together for 1 year or on a vertical, multiyear basis.
(b) An organizational arrangement similar to that described in paragraph (a) with additional variations in instruction and curriculum. The smaller unit usually seeks to maintain a program different from that of the larger school, or of other smaller units. It may be vertically organized, but is dependent upon the school principal for its existence, budget, and staff.
(c) A separate and autonomous smaller unit formally authorized by the district school board or district school superintendent. The smaller unit plans and runs its own program, has its own staff and students, and receives its own separate budget. The smaller unit must negotiate the use of common space with the larger school and defer to the building principal on matters of safety and building operation.
History.s. 112, ch. 2002-387; s. 10, ch. 2003-391; s. 82, ch. 2004-357; s. 3, ch. 2006-301; s. 2, ch. 2008-43; s. 13, ch. 2009-59; s. 6, ch. 2012-191; s. 9, ch. 2013-27; s. 34, ch. 2014-39; s. 2, ch. 2014-184.
1003.03 Maximum class size.
(1) CLASS SIZE MAXIMUMS.Each year, on or before the October student membership survey, the following class size maximums shall be satisfied:
(a) The maximum number of students assigned to each teacher who is teaching core-curricula courses in public school classrooms for prekindergarten through grade 3 may not exceed 18 students.
(b) The maximum number of students assigned to each teacher who is teaching core-curricula courses in public school classrooms for grades 4 through 8 may not exceed 22 students. The maximum number of students assigned to a core-curricula high school course in which a student in grades 4 through 8 is enrolled shall be governed by the requirements in paragraph (c).
(c) The maximum number of students assigned to each teacher who is teaching core-curricula courses in public school classrooms for grades 9 through 12 may not exceed 25 students.

These maximums shall be maintained after the October student membership survey, except as provided in paragraph (2)(b) or due to an extreme emergency beyond the control of the district school board.

(2) IMPLEMENTATION.
(a) The Department of Education shall annually calculate class size measures described in subsection (1) based upon the October student membership survey.
(b) A student who enrolls in a school after the October student membership survey may be assigned to an existing class that temporarily exceeds the maximum number of students in subsection (1) if the district school board determines it to be impractical, educationally unsound, or disruptive to student learning to not assign the student to the class. If the district school board makes this determination:
1. Up to three students may be assigned to a teacher in kindergarten through grade 3 above the maximum as provided in paragraph (1)(a);
2. Up to five students may be assigned to a teacher in grades 4 through 12 above the maximum as provided in paragraphs (1)(b) and (c), respectively; and
3. The district school board shall develop a plan that provides that the school will be in full compliance with the maximum class size in subsection (1) by the next October student membership survey.
(3) IMPLEMENTATION OPTIONS.District school boards must consider, but are not limited to, implementing the following items in order to meet the constitutional class size maximums described in subsection (1):
(a) Adopt policies to encourage qualified students to take dual enrollment courses.
(b) Adopt policies to encourage students to take courses from the Florida Virtual School and other virtual instruction options under s. 1002.45.
(c)1. Repeal district school board policies that require students to earn more than the 24 credits to graduate from high school.
2. Implement the early graduation options provided in ss. 1002.3105(5) and 1003.4281.
(d) Use methods to maximize use of instructional staff, such as changing required teaching loads and scheduling of planning periods, deploying district employees that have professional certification to the classroom, using adjunct educators, or any other method not prohibited by law.
(e) Use innovative methods to reduce the cost of school construction by using prototype school designs, using SMART Schools designs, or any other method not prohibited by law.
(f) Use joint-use facilities through partnerships with Florida College System institutions, state universities, and private colleges and universities. Joint-use facilities available for use as K-12 classrooms that do not meet the K-12 State Regulations for Educational Facilities in the Florida Building Code may be used at the discretion of the district school board provided that such facilities meet all other health, life, safety, and fire codes.
(g) Adopt alternative methods of class scheduling, such as block scheduling.
(h) Redraw school attendance zones to maximize use of facilities while minimizing the additional use of transportation.
(i) Operate schools beyond the normal operating hours to provide classes in the evening or operate more than one session of school during the day.
(j) Use year-round schools and other nontraditional calendars that do not adversely impact annual assessment of student achievement.
(k) Review and consider amending any collective bargaining contracts that hinder the implementation of class size reduction.
(l) Use any other approach not prohibited by law.
(4) ACCOUNTABILITY.
(a) If the department determines that the number of students assigned to any individual class exceeds the class size maximum, as required in subsection (1), based upon the October student membership survey, the department shall:
1. Identify, for each grade group, the number of classes in which the number of students exceeds the maximum and the total number of students which exceeds the maximum for all classes.
2. Determine the number of FTE students which exceeds the maximum for each grade group.
3. Multiply the total number of FTE students which exceeds the maximum for each grade group by the district’s FTE dollar amount of the class size categorical allocation for that year and calculate the total for all three grade groups.
4. Multiply the total number of FTE students which exceeds the maximum for all classes by an amount equal to 50 percent of the base student allocation adjusted by the district cost differential for each of the 2010-2011 through 2013-2014 fiscal years and by an amount equal to the base student allocation adjusted by the district cost differential in the 2014-2015 fiscal year and thereafter.
5. Reduce the district’s class size categorical allocation by an amount equal to the sum of the calculations in subparagraphs 3. and 4.
(b) The amount of funds reduced shall be the lesser of the amount calculated in paragraph (a) or the undistributed balance of the district’s class size categorical allocation. The Florida Education Finance Program Appropriation Allocation Conference shall verify the department’s calculation in paragraph (a). The commissioner may withhold distribution of the class size categorical allocation to the extent necessary to comply with paragraph (a).
(c) In lieu of the reduction calculation in paragraph (a), if the Commissioner of Education has evidence that a district was unable to meet the class size requirements despite appropriate efforts to do so or because of an extreme emergency, the commissioner may recommend by February 15, subject to approval of the Legislative Budget Commission, the reduction of an alternate amount of funds from the district’s class size categorical allocation.
(d) Upon approval of the reduction calculation in paragraphs (a)-(c), the commissioner must prepare a reallocation of the funds made available for the districts that have fully met the class size requirements. The funds shall be reallocated by calculating an amount of up to 5 percent of the base student allocation multiplied by the total district FTE students. The reallocation total may not exceed 25 percent of the total funds reduced.
(e) Each district that has not complied with the requirements in subsection (1) shall submit to the commissioner by February 1 a plan certified by the district school board that describes the specific actions the district will take in order to fully comply with the requirements in subsection (1) by October of the following school year. If a district submits the certified plan by the required deadline, the funds remaining after the reallocation calculation in paragraph (d) shall be added back to the district’s class size categorical allocation based on each qualifying district’s proportion of the total reduction for all qualifying districts for which a reduction was calculated in paragraphs (a)-(c). However, no district shall have an amount added back that is greater than the amount that was reduced.
(f) The department shall adjust school district class size reduction categorical allocation distributions based on the calculations in paragraphs (a)-(e).
(5) TEAM-TEACHING STRATEGIES.
(a) School districts may use teaching strategies that include the assignment of more than one teacher to a classroom of students and that were implemented before July 1, 2005. Effective July 1, 2005, school districts may implement additional teaching strategies that include the assignment of more than one teacher to a classroom of students for the following purposes only:
1. Pairing teachers for the purpose of staff development.
2. Pairing new teachers with veteran teachers.
3. Reducing turnover among new teachers.
4. Pairing teachers who are teaching out-of-field with teachers who are in-field.
5. Providing for more flexibility and innovation in the classroom.
6. Improving learning opportunities for students, including students who have disabilities.
(b) Teaching strategies, including team teaching, co-teaching, or inclusion teaching, implemented on or after July 1, 2005, pursuant to paragraph (a) may be implemented subject to the following restrictions:
1. Reasonable limits shall be placed on the number of students in a classroom so that classrooms are not overcrowded. Teacher-to-student ratios within a curriculum area or grade level must not exceed constitutional limits.
2. At least one member of the team must have at least 3 years of teaching experience.
3. At least one member of the team must be teaching in-field.
4. The teachers must be trained in team-teaching methods within 1 year after assignment.
(c) As used in this subsection, the term:
1. “Team teaching” or “co-teaching” means two or more teachers are assigned to a group of students and each teacher is responsible for all of the students during the entire class period. In order to be considered team teaching or co-teaching, each teacher is responsible for planning, delivering, and evaluating instruction for all students in the class or subject for the entire class period.
2. “Inclusion teaching” means two or more teachers are assigned to a group of students, but one of the teachers is responsible for only one student or a small group of students in the classroom.

The use of strategies implemented as outlined in this subsection meets the letter and intent of the Florida Constitution and the Florida Statutes which relate to implementing class size reduction, and this subsection applies retroactively. A school district may not be penalized financially or otherwise as a result of the use of any legal strategy, including, but not limited to, those set forth in subsection (3) and this subsection.

(6) COURSES FOR COMPLIANCE.Consistent with s. 1003.01(14), the Department of Education shall identify from the Course Code Directory the core-curricula courses for the purpose of satisfying the maximum class size requirement in this section. The department may adopt rules to implement this subsection, if necessary.
History.s. 113, ch. 2002-387; s. 2, ch. 2003-391; s. 59, ch. 2005-152; s. 16, ch. 2006-74; s. 2, ch. 2007-59; s. 7, ch. 2007-98; s. 1, ch. 2007-328; s. 5, ch. 2008-142; s. 9, ch. 2009-3; s. 14, ch. 2009-59; ss. 11, 12, ch. 2010-154; s. 31, ch. 2011-5; s. 15, ch. 2011-55; s. 13, ch. 2011-137; s. 11, ch. 2012-133; s. 10, ch. 2013-27; s. 45, ch. 2013-35; s. 35, ch. 2014-39.
1003.04 Student conduct and parental involvement.
(1) Each public K-12 student must remain in attendance throughout the school year, unless excused by the school for illness or other good cause, and must comply fully with the school’s code of conduct.
(2) The parent of each public K-12 student must cooperate with the authority of the student’s district school board, superintendent, principal, teachers, and school bus drivers, according to ss. 1003.31 and 1003.32, to remove the student from the classroom and the school bus and, when appropriate and available, to place the student in an alternative educational setting, if the student is disobedient, disrespectful, violent, abusive, uncontrollable, or disruptive.
(3) It is the goal of the Legislature and each district school board that the parent of each public K-12 student comply with the school’s reasonable and time-acceptable parental involvement requests.
History.s. 114, ch. 2002-387; s. 34, ch. 2003-391.
1003.05 Assistance to transitioning students from military families.
(1) The Legislature finds that school-aged dependents of military personnel, otherwise known as military students, are faced with numerous transitions during their formative years and that moves during the high school years provide special challenges to learning and future achievement. Recognizing the challenges faced by military students and the importance of military families to our community and economy, the Department of Education shall assist the transition of these students by improving the timely transfer of records, developing systems to ease student transition during the first 2 weeks of enrollment, promoting practices which foster access to extracurricular programs, establishing procedures to lessen the adverse impact of moves from the end of the junior year as well as before and during the senior year, encouraging or continuing partnerships between the military base and the school system, providing services for transitioning students when applying to and finding funding for postsecondary study, and providing other assistance as identified by department, school, and military personnel.
(2) The Department of Education shall facilitate the development and implementation of memoranda of agreement between school districts and military installations which address strategies for assisting students who are the children of active duty military personnel in the transition to Florida schools.
(3) Dependent children of active duty military personnel who otherwise meet the eligibility criteria for special academic programs offered through public schools shall be given first preference for admission to such programs even if the program is being offered through a public school other than the school to which the student would generally be assigned. If such a program is offered through a public school other than the school to which the student would generally be assigned, the parent or guardian of the student must assume responsibility for transporting the student to that school. For purposes of this subsection, special academic programs include magnet schools, advanced studies programs, advanced placement, dual enrollment, Advanced International Certificate of Education, and International Baccalaureate.
History.s. 1, ch. 2003-44; s. 12, ch. 2004-230; s. 17, ch. 2006-74; s. 8, ch. 2006-190.
1003.06 Classroom placement of multiple birth siblings.
(1) As used in this section, the term “multiple birth siblings” means twins, triplets, quadruplets, or other siblings resulting from a multiple birth.
(2)(a) The parent of multiple birth siblings who are assigned to the same grade level and school may request in writing that the school place the siblings in the same classroom or in separate classrooms. The request must be made no later than 5 days before the first day of each school year or 5 days after the first day of attendance of students during the school year if the students are enrolled in the school after the school year commences.
(b) The school may recommend to the parent the appropriate classroom placement for multiple birth siblings and may provide professional educational advice to assist the parent with the decision regarding appropriate classroom placement.
(3) Except as provided in subsection (4) or subsection (5), a school shall provide the multiple birth siblings with the classroom placement requested by the parent.
(4)(a) A school is not required to place multiple birth siblings in the same classroom if factual evidence of performance shows proof that the multiple birth siblings should be separated.
(b) A school is not required to place multiple birth siblings in separate classrooms if the request would require the school district to add an additional class to the grade level of the multiple birth siblings.
(5)(a) At the end of the first grading period following the multiple birth siblings’ enrollment in the school, if the principal of the school, in consultation with the teacher of each classroom in which the multiple birth siblings are placed, determines that the requested classroom placement is disruptive to the school, the principal may determine the appropriate classroom placement for the siblings.
(b) A parent may appeal the principal’s classroom placement of multiple birth siblings in the manner provided by school district policy. During an appeal, the multiple birth siblings shall remain in the classroom chosen by the parent.
(6) This section does not affect:
(a) A right or obligation under s. 1003.57 or under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 20 U.S.C. ss. 1400 et seq., regarding the individual placement decisions of the school district; or
(b) The right of a school district, principal, or teacher to remove a student from a classroom pursuant to school district student discipline policies.
History.s. 1, ch. 2008-210.
PART II
SCHOOL ATTENDANCE
1003.21 School attendance.
1003.22 School-entry health examinations; immunization against communicable diseases; exemptions; duties of Department of Health.
1003.23 Attendance records and reports.
1003.24 Parents responsible for attendance of children; attendance policy.
1003.25 Procedures for maintenance and transfer of student records.
1003.26 Enforcement of school attendance.
1003.27 Court procedure and penalties.
1003.28 Continuation of truancy remedial activities upon transfer of student; retention of legal jurisdiction.
1003.29 Notice to schools of court action.
1003.21 School attendance.
(1)(a)1. All children who have attained the age of 6 years or who will have attained the age of 6 years by February 1 of any school year or who are older than 6 years of age but who have not attained the age of 16 years, except as otherwise provided, are required to attend school regularly during the entire school term.
2. Children who will have attained the age of 5 years on or before September 1 of the school year are eligible for admission to public kindergartens during that school year under rules adopted by the district school board.
(b) Any child who has attained the age of 6 years on or before September 1 of the school year and who has been enrolled in a public school or who has attained the age of 6 years on or before September 1 and has satisfactorily completed the requirements for kindergarten in a private school from which the district school board accepts transfer of academic credit, or who otherwise meets the criteria for admission or transfer in a manner similar to that applicable to other grades, shall progress according to the district’s student progression plan. However, nothing in this section shall authorize the state or any school district to oversee or exercise control over the curricula or academic programs of private schools or home education programs.
(c) A student who attains the age of 16 years during the school year is not subject to compulsory school attendance beyond the date upon which he or she attains that age if the student files a formal declaration of intent to terminate school enrollment with the district school board. Public school students who have attained the age of 16 years and who have not graduated are subject to compulsory school attendance until the formal declaration of intent is filed with the district school board. The declaration must acknowledge that terminating school enrollment is likely to reduce the student’s earning potential and must be signed by the student and the student’s parent. The school district shall notify the student’s parent of receipt of the student’s declaration of intent to terminate school enrollment. The student’s certified school counselor or other school personnel shall conduct an exit interview with the student to determine the reasons for the student’s decision to terminate school enrollment and actions that could be taken to keep the student in school. The student’s certified school counselor or other school personnel shall inform the student of opportunities to continue his or her education in a different environment, including, but not limited to, adult education and high school equivalency examination preparation. Additionally, the student shall complete a survey in a format prescribed by the Department of Education to provide data on student reasons for terminating enrollment and actions taken by schools to keep students enrolled.
(d) Students who become or have become married and students who are pregnant shall not be prohibited from attending school. These students and students who are parents shall receive the same educational instruction or its equivalent as other students, but may voluntarily be assigned to a class or program suited to their special needs. Consistent with s. 1003.54, pregnant or parenting teens may participate in a teenage parent program. Pregnant students may attend alternative education programs or adult education programs, provided that the curriculum allows the student to continue to work toward a high school diploma.
(e) Consistent with rules adopted by the State Board of Education, children with disabilities who have attained the age of 3 years shall be eligible for admission to public special education programs and for related services. Children with disabilities younger than 3 years of age who are deaf or hard of hearing; visually impaired; dual sensory impaired; orthopedically impaired; other health impaired; who have experienced traumatic brain injury; who have autism spectrum disorder; established conditions, or who exhibit developmental delays or intellectual disabilities may be eligible for special programs and may receive services in accordance with rules of the State Board of Education. Rules for the identification of established conditions for children birth through 2 years of age and developmental delays for children birth through 5 years of age must be adopted by the State Board of Education.
(f) Children and youths who are experiencing homelessness and children who are known to the department, as defined in s. 39.0016, must have access to a free public education and must be admitted to school in the school district in which they or their families live. School districts shall assist such children in meeting the requirements of subsection (4) and s. 1003.22, as well as local requirements for documentation.
(2)(a) The State Board of Education may adopt rules under which students not meeting the entrance age may be transferred from another state if their parents have been legal residents of that state.
(b) Each district school board, in accordance with rules of the State Board of Education, shall adopt a policy that authorizes a parent to request and be granted permission for absence of a student from school for religious instruction or religious holidays.
(3) The district school superintendent may authorize certificates of exemptions from school attendance requirements in certain situations. Students within the compulsory attendance age limits who hold valid certificates of exemption that have been issued by the superintendent shall be exempt from attending school. A certificate of exemption shall cease to be valid at the end of the school year in which it is issued.
(4) Before admitting a child to kindergarten, the principal shall require evidence that the child has attained the age at which he or she should be admitted in accordance with the provisions of subparagraph (1)(a)2. The district school superintendent may require evidence of the age of any child whom he or she believes to be within the limits of compulsory attendance as provided for by law. If the first prescribed evidence is not available, the next evidence obtainable in the order set forth below shall be accepted:
(a) A duly attested transcript of the child’s birth record filed according to law with a public officer charged with the duty of recording births;
(b) A duly attested transcript of a certificate of baptism showing the date of birth and place of baptism of the child, accompanied by an affidavit sworn to by the parent;
(c) An insurance policy on the child’s life that has been in force for at least 2 years;
(d) A bona fide contemporary religious record of the child’s birth accompanied by an affidavit sworn to by the parent;
(e) A passport or certificate of arrival in the United States showing the age of the child;
(f) A transcript of record of age shown in the child’s school record of at least 4 years prior to application, stating date of birth; or
(g) If none of these evidences can be produced, an affidavit of age sworn to by the parent, accompanied by a certificate of age signed by a public health officer or by a public school physician, or, if these are not available in the county, by a licensed practicing physician designated by the district school board, which states that the health officer or physician has examined the child and believes that the age as stated in the affidavit is substantially correct. Children and youths who are experiencing homelessness and children who are known to the department, as defined in s. 39.0016, shall be given temporary exemption from this section for 30 school days.
History.s. 116, ch. 2002-387; s. 18, ch. 2006-74; s. 4, ch. 2006-301; s. 4, ch. 2008-204; s. 5, ch. 2009-35; s. 7, ch. 2009-164; s. 4, ch. 2013-89; s. 16, ch. 2014-20.
1003.22 School-entry health examinations; immunization against communicable diseases; exemptions; duties of Department of Health.
(1) Each district school board and the governing authority of each private school shall require that each child who is entitled to admittance to kindergarten, or is entitled to any other initial entrance into a public or private school in this state, present a certification of a school-entry health examination performed within 1 year before enrollment in school. Each district school board, and the governing authority of each private school, may establish a policy that permits a student up to 30 school days to present a certification of a school-entry health examination. Children and youths who are experiencing homelessness and children who are known to the department, as defined in s. 39.0016, shall be given a temporary exemption for 30 school days. Any district school board that establishes such a policy shall include provisions in its local school health services plan to assist students in obtaining the health examinations. However, a child shall be exempted from the requirement of a health examination upon written request of the parent of the child stating objections to the examination on religious grounds.
(2) The State Board of Education, subject to the concurrence of the Department of Health, shall adopt rules to govern medical examinations and immunizations performed under this section.
(3) The Department of Health may adopt rules necessary to administer and enforce this section. The Department of Health, after consultation with the Department of Education, shall adopt rules governing the immunization of children against, the testing for, and the control of preventable communicable diseases. The rules must include procedures for exempting a child from immunization requirements. Immunizations shall be required for poliomyelitis, diphtheria, rubeola, rubella, pertussis, mumps, tetanus, and other communicable diseases as determined by rules of the Department of Health. The manner and frequency of administration of the immunization or testing shall conform to recognized standards of medical practice. The Department of Health shall supervise and secure the enforcement of the required immunization. Immunizations required by this section shall be available at no cost from the county health departments.
(4) Each district school board and the governing authority of each private school shall establish and enforce as policy that, prior to admittance to or attendance in a public or private school, grades kindergarten through 12, or any other initial entrance into a Florida public or private school, each child present or have on file with the school a certification of immunization for the prevention of those communicable diseases for which immunization is required by the Department of Health and further shall provide for appropriate screening of its students for scoliosis at the proper age. Such certification shall be made on forms approved and provided by the Department of Health and shall become a part of each student’s permanent record, to be transferred when the student transfers, is promoted, or changes schools. The transfer of such immunization certification by Florida public schools shall be accomplished using the Florida Automated System for Transferring Education Records and shall be deemed to meet the requirements of this section.
(5) The provisions of this section shall not apply if:
(a) The parent of the child objects in writing that the administration of immunizing agents conflicts with his or her religious tenets or practices;
(b) A physician licensed under the provisions of chapter 458 or chapter 459 certifies in writing, on a form approved and provided by the Department of Health, that the child should be permanently exempt from the required immunization for medical reasons stated in writing, based upon valid clinical reasoning or evidence, demonstrating the need for the permanent exemption;
(c) A physician licensed under the provisions of chapter 458, chapter 459, or chapter 460 certifies in writing, on a form approved and provided by the Department of Health, that the child has received as many immunizations as are medically indicated at the time and is in the process of completing necessary immunizations;
(d) The Department of Health determines that, according to recognized standards of medical practice, any required immunization is unnecessary or hazardous; or
(e) An authorized school official issues a temporary exemption, for up to 30 school days, to permit a student who transfers into a new county to attend class until his or her records can be obtained. Children and youths who are experiencing homelessness and children who are known to the department, as defined in s. 39.0016, shall be given a temporary exemption for 30 school days. The public school health nurse or authorized private school official is responsible for followup of each such student until proper documentation or immunizations are obtained. An exemption for 30 days may be issued for a student who enters a juvenile justice program to permit the student to attend class until his or her records can be obtained or until the immunizations can be obtained. An authorized juvenile justice official is responsible for followup of each student who enters a juvenile justice program until proper documentation or immunizations are obtained.
(6)(a) No person licensed by this state as a physician or nurse shall be liable for any injury caused by his or her action or failure to act in the administration of a vaccine or other immunizing agent pursuant to the provisions of this section if the person acts as a reasonably prudent person with similar professional training would have acted under the same or similar circumstances.
(b) No member of a district school board, or any of its employees, or member of a governing board of a private school, or any of its employees, shall be liable for any injury caused by the administration of a vaccine to any student who is required to be so immunized or for a failure to diagnose scoliosis pursuant to the provisions of this section.
(7) The parents of any child admitted to or in attendance at a Florida public or private school, grades prekindergarten through 12, are responsible for assuring that the child is in compliance with the provisions of this section.
(8) Each public school, including public kindergarten, and each private school, including private kindergarten, shall be required to provide to the county health department director or administrator annual reports of compliance with the provisions of this section. Reports shall be completed on forms provided by the Department of Health for each kindergarten, and other grade as specified; and the reports shall include the status of children who were admitted at the beginning of the school year. After consultation with the Department of Education, the Department of Health shall establish by administrative rule the dates for submission of these reports, the grades for which the reports shall be required, and the forms to be used.
(9) The presence of any of the communicable diseases for which immunization is required by the Department of Health in a Florida public or private school shall permit the county health department director or administrator or the State Health Officer to declare a communicable disease emergency. The declaration of such emergency shall mandate that all students in attendance in the school who are not in compliance with the provisions of this section be identified by the district school board or by the governing authority of the private school; and the school health and immunization records of such children shall be made available to the county health department director or administrator. Those children identified as not being immunized against the disease for which the emergency has been declared shall be temporarily excluded from school by the district school board, or the governing authority of the private school, until such time as is specified by the county health department director or administrator.
(10) Each district school board and the governing authority of each private school shall:
(a) Refuse admittance to any child otherwise entitled to admittance to kindergarten, or any other initial entrance into a Florida public or private school, who is not in compliance with the provisions of subsection (4).
(b) Temporarily exclude from attendance any student who is not in compliance with the provisions of subsection (4).
(11) The provisions of this section do not apply to those persons admitted to or attending adult education classes unless the adult students are under 21 years of age.
History.s. 117, ch. 2002-387; s. 38, ch. 2004-41; s. 6, ch. 2009-35; s. 8, ch. 2009-164.
1003.23 Attendance records and reports.
(1) The attendance of all public K-12 school students shall be checked each school day in the manner prescribed by rules of the State Board of Education and recorded in the teacher’s register or by some approved system of recording attendance. Students may be counted in attendance only if they are actually present at school or are away from school on a school day and are engaged in an educational activity which constitutes a part of the school-approved instructional program for the student.
(2) All officials, teachers, and other employees in public, parochial, religious, denominational, and private K-12 schools, including private tutors, shall keep all records and shall prepare and submit promptly all reports that may be required by law and by rules of the State Board of Education and district school boards. Such records shall include a register of enrollment and attendance and all persons described above shall make these reports therefrom as may be required by the State Board of Education. The enrollment register shall show the absence or attendance of each student enrolled for each school day of the year in a manner prescribed by the State Board of Education. The register shall be open for the inspection by the designated school representative or the district school superintendent of the district in which the school is located. Violation of the provisions of this section shall be a misdemeanor of the second degree, punishable as provided by law. This section shall not apply to home education programs provided in s. 1002.41.
History.s. 118, ch. 2002-387.
1003.24 Parents responsible for attendance of children; attendance policy.Each parent of a child within the compulsory attendance age is responsible for the child’s school attendance as required by law. The absence of a student from school is prima facie evidence of a violation of this section; however, criminal prosecution under this chapter may not be brought against a parent until the provisions of s. 1003.26 have been complied with. A parent of a student is not responsible for the student’s nonattendance at school under any of the following conditions:
(1) WITH PERMISSION.The absence was with permission of the head of the school;
(2) WITHOUT KNOWLEDGE.The absence was without the parent’s knowledge, consent, or connivance, in which case the student shall be dealt with as a dependent child;
(3) FINANCIAL INABILITY.The parent was unable financially to provide necessary clothes for the student, which inability was reported in writing to the superintendent prior to the opening of school or immediately after the beginning of such inability, provided that the validity of any claim for exemption under this subsection shall be determined by the district school superintendent subject to appeal to the district school board; or
(4) SICKNESS, INJURY, OR OTHER INSURMOUNTABLE CONDITION.Attendance was impracticable or inadvisable on account of sickness or injury, attested to by a written statement of a licensed practicing physician, or was impracticable because of some other stated insurmountable condition as defined by rules of the State Board of Education. If a student is continually sick and repeatedly absent from school, he or she must be under the supervision of a physician in order to receive an excuse from attendance. Such excuse provides that a student’s condition justifies absence for more than the number of days permitted by the district school board.

Each district school board shall establish an attendance policy that includes, but is not limited to, the required number of days each school year that a student must be in attendance and the number of absences and tardinesses after which a statement explaining such absences and tardinesses must be on file at the school. Each school in the district must determine if an absence or tardiness is excused or unexcused according to criteria established by the district school board.

History.s. 119, ch. 2002-387.
1003.25 Procedures for maintenance and transfer of student records.
(1) Each principal shall maintain a permanent cumulative record for each student enrolled in a public K-12 school. Such record shall be maintained in the form, and contain all data, prescribed by rule by the State Board of Education. The cumulative record is confidential and exempt from the provisions of s. 119.07(1) and is open to inspection only as provided in chapter 1002.
(2) The procedure for transferring and maintaining records of students who transfer from school to school shall be prescribed by rules of the State Board of Education.
(3) Procedures relating to the acceptance of transfer work and credit for students shall be prescribed by rule by the State Board of Education.
History.s. 120, ch. 2002-387.
1003.26 Enforcement of school attendance.The Legislature finds that poor academic performance is associated with nonattendance and that school districts must take an active role in promoting and enforcing attendance as a means of improving student performance. It is the policy of the state that each district school superintendent be responsible for enforcing school attendance of all students subject to the compulsory school age in the school district and supporting enforcement of school attendance by local law enforcement agencies. The responsibility includes recommending policies and procedures to the district school board that require public schools to respond in a timely manner to every unexcused absence, and every absence for which the reason is unknown, of students enrolled in the schools. District school board policies shall require the parent of a student to justify each absence of the student, and that justification will be evaluated based on adopted district school board policies that define excused and unexcused absences. The policies must provide that public schools track excused and unexcused absences and contact the home in the case of an unexcused absence from school, or an absence from school for which the reason is unknown, to prevent the development of patterns of nonattendance. The Legislature finds that early intervention in school attendance is the most effective way of producing good attendance habits that will lead to improved student learning and achievement. Each public school shall implement the following steps to promote and enforce regular school attendance:
(1) CONTACT, REFER, AND ENFORCE.
(a) Upon each unexcused absence, or absence for which the reason is unknown, the school principal or his or her designee shall contact the student’s parent to determine the reason for the absence. If the absence is an excused absence, as defined by district school board policy, the school shall provide opportunities for the student to make up assigned work and not receive an academic penalty unless the work is not made up within a reasonable time.
(b) If a student has had at least five unexcused absences, or absences for which the reasons are unknown, within a calendar month or 10 unexcused absences, or absences for which the reasons are unknown, within a 90-calendar-day period, the student’s primary teacher shall report to the school principal or his or her designee that the student may be exhibiting a pattern of nonattendance. The principal shall, unless there is clear evidence that the absences are not a pattern of nonattendance, refer the case to the school’s child study team to determine if early patterns of truancy are developing. If the child study team finds that a pattern of nonattendance is developing, whether the absences are excused or not, a meeting with the parent must be scheduled to identify potential remedies, and the principal shall notify the district school superintendent and the school district contact for home education programs that the referred student is exhibiting a pattern of nonattendance.
(c) If an initial meeting does not resolve the problem, the child study team shall implement the following:
1. Frequent attempts at communication between the teacher and the family.
2. Evaluation for alternative education programs.
3. Attendance contracts.

The child study team may, but is not required to, implement other interventions, including referral to other agencies for family services or recommendation for filing a truancy petition pursuant to s. 984.151.

(d) The child study team shall be diligent in facilitating intervention services and shall report the case to the district school superintendent only when all reasonable efforts to resolve the nonattendance behavior are exhausted.
(e) If the parent refuses to participate in the remedial strategies because he or she believes that those strategies are unnecessary or inappropriate, the parent may appeal to the district school board. The district school board may provide a hearing officer, and the hearing officer shall make a recommendation for final action to the district school board. If the district school board’s final determination is that the strategies of the child study team are appropriate, and the parent still refuses to participate or cooperate, the district school superintendent may seek criminal prosecution for noncompliance with compulsory school attendance.
(f)1. If the parent of a child who has been identified as exhibiting a pattern of nonattendance enrolls the child in a home education program pursuant to chapter 1002, the district school superintendent shall provide the parent a copy of s. 1002.41 and the accountability requirements of this paragraph. The district school superintendent shall also refer the parent to a home education review committee composed of the district contact for home education programs and at least two home educators selected by the parent from a district list of all home educators who have conducted a home education program for at least 3 years and who have indicated a willingness to serve on the committee. The home education review committee shall review the portfolio of the student, as defined by s. 1002.41, every 30 days during the district’s regular school terms until the committee is satisfied that the home education program is in compliance with s. 1002.41(1)(b). The first portfolio review must occur within the first 30 calendar days of the establishment of the program. The provisions of subparagraph 2. do not apply once the committee determines the home education program is in compliance with s. 1002.41(1)(b).
2. If the parent fails to provide a portfolio to the committee, the committee shall notify the district school superintendent. The district school superintendent shall then terminate the home education program and require the parent to enroll the child in an attendance option that meets the definition of “regular school attendance” under s. 1003.01(13)(a), (b), (c), or (e), within 3 days. Upon termination of a home education program pursuant to this subparagraph, the parent shall not be eligible to reenroll the child in a home education program for 180 calendar days. Failure of a parent to enroll the child in an attendance option as required by this subparagraph after termination of the home education program pursuant to this subparagraph shall constitute noncompliance with the compulsory attendance requirements of s. 1003.21 and may result in criminal prosecution under s. 1003.27(2). Nothing contained herein shall restrict the ability of the district school superintendent, or the ability of his or her designee, to review the portfolio pursuant to s. 1002.41(1)(b).
(g) If a student subject to compulsory school attendance will not comply with attempts to enforce school attendance, the parent or the district school superintendent or his or her designee shall refer the case to the case staffing committee pursuant to s. 984.12, and the district school superintendent or his or her designee may file a truancy petition pursuant to the procedures in s. 984.151.
(2) GIVE WRITTEN NOTICE.
(a) Under the direction of the district school superintendent, a designated school representative shall give written notice that requires enrollment or attendance within 3 days after the date of notice, in person or by return-receipt mail, to the parent when no valid reason is found for a student’s nonenrollment in school. If the notice and requirement are ignored, the designated school representative shall report the case to the district school superintendent, and may refer the case to the case staffing committee, established pursuant to s. 984.12. The district school superintendent shall take such steps as are necessary to bring criminal prosecution against the parent.
(b) Subsequent to the activities required under subsection (1), the district school superintendent or his or her designee shall give written notice in person or by return-receipt mail to the parent that criminal prosecution is being sought for nonattendance. The district school superintendent may file a truancy petition, as defined in s. 984.03, following the procedures outlined in s. 984.151.
(3) RETURN STUDENT TO PARENT.A designated school representative may visit the home or place of residence of a student and any other place in which he or she is likely to find any student who is required to attend school when the student is not enrolled or is absent from school during school hours without an excuse, and, when the student is found, shall return the student to his or her parent or to the principal or teacher in charge of the school, or to the private tutor from whom absent, or to the juvenile assessment center or other location established by the district school board to receive students who are absent from school. Upon receipt of the student, the parent shall be immediately notified.
(4) REPORT TO APPROPRIATE AUTHORITY.A designated school representative shall report to the appropriate authority designated by law to receive such notices, all violations of the Child Labor Law that may come to his or her knowledge.
(5) RIGHT TO INSPECT.A designated school representative shall have the right of access to, and inspection of, establishments where minors may be employed or detained only for the purpose of ascertaining whether students of compulsory school age are actually employed there and are actually working there regularly. The designated school representative shall, if he or she finds unsatisfactory working conditions or violations of the Child Labor Law, report his or her findings to the appropriate authority.
History.s. 121, ch. 2002-387; s. 5, ch. 2006-301.
1003.27 Court procedure and penalties.The court procedure and penalties for the enforcement of the provisions of this part, relating to compulsory school attendance, shall be as follows:
(1) COURT JURISDICTION.The circuit court has original and exclusive jurisdiction of all proceedings against, or prosecutions of, students under the provisions of this part. Proceedings against, or prosecutions of, parents or employers as provided by this section shall be in the court of each county having jurisdiction of misdemeanors wherein trial by jury is afforded the defendant.
(2) NONENROLLMENT AND NONATTENDANCE CASES.
(a) In each case of nonenrollment or of nonattendance upon the part of a student who is required to attend some school, when no valid reason for such nonenrollment or nonattendance is found, the district school superintendent shall institute a criminal prosecution against the student’s parent.
(b) Each public school principal or the principal’s designee shall notify the district school board of each minor student under its jurisdiction who accumulates 15 unexcused absences in a period of 90 calendar days. Each designee of the governing body of each private school, and each parent whose child is enrolled in a home education program, may provide the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles with the legal name, sex, date of birth, and social security number of each minor student under his or her jurisdiction who fails to satisfy relevant attendance requirements and who fails to otherwise satisfy the requirements of s. 322.091. The district school superintendent must provide the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles the legal name, sex, date of birth, and social security number of each minor student who has been reported under this paragraph and who fails to otherwise satisfy the requirements of s. 322.091. The Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles may not issue a driver license or learner’s driver license to, and shall suspend any previously issued driver license or learner’s driver license of, any such minor student, pursuant to the provisions of s. 322.091.
(3) HABITUAL TRUANCY CASES.The district school superintendent is authorized to file a truancy petition, as defined in s. 984.03, following the procedures outlined in s. 984.151. If the district school superintendent chooses not to file a truancy petition, procedures for filing a child-in-need-of-services petition shall be commenced pursuant to this subsection and chapter 984. In accordance with procedures established by the district school board, the designated school representative shall refer a student who is habitually truant and the student’s family to the children-in-need-of-services and families-in-need-of-services provider or the case staffing committee, established pursuant to s. 984.12, as determined by the cooperative agreement required in this section. The case staffing committee may request the Department of Juvenile Justice or its designee to file a child-in-need-of-services petition based upon the report and efforts of the district school board or other community agency or may seek to resolve the truant behavior through the school or community-based organizations or agencies. Prior to and subsequent to the filing of a child-in-need-of-services petition due to habitual truancy, the appropriate governmental agencies must allow a reasonable time to complete actions required by this section and s. 1003.26 to remedy the conditions leading to the truant behavior. Prior to the filing of a petition, the district school board must have complied with the requirements of s. 1003.26, and those efforts must have been unsuccessful.
(4) COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS.The circuit manager of the Department of Juvenile Justice or the circuit manager’s designee, the district administrator of the Department of Children and Families or the district administrator’s designee, and the district school superintendent or the superintendent’s designee must develop a cooperative interagency agreement that:
(a) Clearly defines each department’s role, responsibility, and function in working with habitual truants and their families.
(b) Identifies and implements measures to resolve and reduce truant behavior.
(c) Addresses issues of streamlining service delivery, the appropriateness of legal intervention, case management, the role and responsibility of the case staffing committee, student and parental intervention and involvement, and community action plans.
(d) Delineates timeframes for implementation and identifies a mechanism for reporting results by the circuit juvenile justice manager or the circuit manager’s designee and the district school superintendent or the superintendent’s designee to the Department of Juvenile Justice and the Department of Education and other governmental entities as needed.
(e) Designates which agency is responsible for each of the intervention steps in this section, to yield more effective and efficient intervention services.
(5) ATTENDANCE REGISTER AS EVIDENCE.The register of attendance of students at a public, parochial, religious, denominational, or private school, or of students taught by a private tutor, kept in compliance with rules of the State Board of Education is prima facie evidence of the facts which it is required to show. A certified copy of any rule and a statement of the date of its adoption by the State Board of Education is admissible as prima facie evidence of the provisions of the rule and of the date of its adoption.
(6) PROCEEDINGS AND PROSECUTIONS; WHO MAY BEGIN.Proceedings or prosecutions under this chapter may be commenced by the district school superintendent, by a designated school representative, by the probation officer of the county, by the executive officer of any court of competent jurisdiction, by an officer of any court of competent jurisdiction, or by a duly authorized agent of the Department of Education or the Department of Juvenile Justice. If a proceeding has been commenced against both a parent and a child pursuant to this chapter, the presiding courts shall make every effort to coordinate sanctions against the child and parent, including ordering the child and parent to perform community service hours or attend counseling together.
(7) PENALTIES.The penalties for refusing or failing to comply with this chapter shall be as follows:
(a) The parent.
1. A parent who refuses or fails to have a minor student who is under his or her control attend school regularly, or who refuses or fails to comply with the requirements in subsection (3), commits a misdemeanor of the second degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083.
2. The continued or habitual absence of a minor student without the consent of the principal or teacher in charge of the school he or she attends or should attend, or of the tutor who instructs or should instruct him or her, is prima facie evidence of a violation of this chapter; however, a showing that the parent has made a bona fide and diligent effort to control and keep the student in school shall be an affirmative defense to any criminal or other liability under this subsection and the court shall refer the parent and child for counseling, guidance, or other needed services.
3. In addition to any other punishment, the court shall order a parent who has violated this section to send the minor student to school, and may also order the parent to participate in an approved parent training class, attend school with the student unless this would cause undue hardship, perform community service hours at the school, or participate in counseling or other services, as appropriate. If a parent is ordered to attend school with a student, the school shall provide for programming to educate the parent and student on the importance of school attendance. It shall be unlawful to terminate any employee solely because he or she is attending school with his or her child pursuant to a court order.
(b) The principal or teacher.A principal or teacher in any public, parochial, religious, denominational, or private school, or a private tutor who willfully violates any provision of this chapter may, upon satisfactory proof of such violation, have his or her certificate revoked by the Department of Education.
(c) The employer.
1. An employer who fails to notify the district school superintendent when he or she ceases to employ a student commits a misdemeanor of the second degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083.
2. An employer who terminates any employee solely because he or she is attending school with a student pursuant to court order commits a misdemeanor of the second degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083.
(d) The student.
1. In addition to any other authorized sanctions, the court shall order a student found to be a habitual truant to make up all school work missed and may order the student to pay a civil penalty of up to $2, based on the student’s ability to pay, for each day of school missed, perform up to 25 community service hours at the school, or participate in counseling or other services, as appropriate.
2. Upon a second or subsequent finding that a student is a habitual truant, the court, in addition to any other authorized sanctions, shall order the student to make up all school work missed and may order the student to pay a civil penalty of up to $5, based on the student’s ability to pay, for each day of school missed, perform up to 50 community service hours at the school, or participate in counseling or other services, as appropriate.
History.s. 122, ch. 2002-387; s. 366, ch. 2014-19.
1003.28 Continuation of truancy remedial activities upon transfer of student; retention of legal jurisdiction.
(1) If, during the activities designed to remedy truant behavior as described in s. 1003.27, the parent of the student who is the subject of such activities transfers the student to another school district in this state in an attempt to circumvent the remedial procedures which have already begun, the administration of the school from which the student transferred shall provide to the administration of the new school, at no charge, copies of all available records and documents relevant to such remedial activities, and the administration of the new school shall begin remedial activities in the program that most closely meets the transfer student’s needs.
(2) In the event that a legal proceeding has commenced, as provided in s. 1003.27, against a student who has been determined to be a habitual truant, the movement of the student who is the subject of such proceeding to another circuit court district in this state will not affect the jurisdiction of the court to proceed with the case under the law.
History.s. 123, ch. 2002-387.
1003.29 Notice to schools of court action.If a court takes action that directly involves a student’s school, including, but not limited to, an order that a student attend school, attend school with his or her parent, perform at grade level, or perform community service hours at the school, the office of the clerk of the court shall provide notice to the school of the court’s action.
History.s. 124, ch. 2002-387.
PART III
CONTROL OF STUDENTS
1003.31 Students subject to control of school.
1003.32 Authority of teacher; responsibility for control of students; district school board and principal duties.
1003.33 Report cards; end-of-the-year status.
1003.31 Students subject to control of school.
(1) Subject to law and rules of the State Board of Education and of the district school board, each student enrolled in a school shall:
(a) During the time she or he is being transported to or from school at public expense;
(b) During the time she or he is attending school;
(c) During the time she or he is on the school premises participating with authorization in a school-sponsored activity; and
(d) During a reasonable time before and after the student is on the premises for attendance at school or for authorized participation in a school-sponsored activity, and only when on the premises,

be under the control and direction of the principal or teacher in charge of the school, and under the immediate control and direction of the teacher or other member of the instructional staff or of the bus driver to whom such responsibility may be assigned by the principal. However, the State Board of Education or the district school board may, by rules, subject each student to the control and direction of the principal or teacher in charge of the school during the time she or he is otherwise en route to or from school or is presumed by law to be attending school. Each district school board, each district school superintendent, and each school principal shall fully support the authority of teachers, according to s. 1003.32, and school bus drivers to remove disobedient, disrespectful, violent, abusive, uncontrollable, or disruptive students from the classroom and the school bus and, when appropriate and available, place such students in an alternative educational setting.

(2) There is a rebuttable presumption that the term “reasonable time” means 30 minutes before or after the activity is scheduled or actually begins or ends, whichever period is longer. A school or district school board may, by policy or other formal action, assume a longer period of supervision. Casual or incidental contact between school district personnel and students on school property shall not result in a legal duty to supervise outside of the reasonable times set forth in this section, provided that parents shall be advised in writing twice per year or by posted signs of the school’s formal supervisory responsibility and that parents should not rely on additional supervision. The duty of supervision shall not extend to anyone other than students attending school and students authorized to participate in school-sponsored activities.
(3) Nothing shall prohibit a district school board from having the right to expel, or to take disciplinary action against, a student who is found to have committed an offense on school property at any time if:
(a) The student is found to have committed a delinquent act which would be a felony if committed by an adult;
(b) The student has had adjudication withheld for a delinquent act which, if committed by an adult, would be a felony; or
(c) The student has been found guilty of a felony.

However, if the student is a student with a disability, the disciplinary action must comply with the procedures set forth in State Board of Education rule.

(4) Each student enrolled in a school may be required to take the following school child’s daily conduct pledge:
(a) I will be respectful at all times and obedient unless asked to do wrong.
(b) I will not hurt another person with my words or my acts, because it is wrong to hurt others.
(c) I will tell the truth, because it is wrong to tell a lie.
(d) I will not steal, because it is wrong to take someone else’s property.
(e) I will respect my body, and not take drugs.
(f) I will show strength and courage, and not do something wrong, just because others are doing it.
(g) I pledge to be nonviolent and to respect my teachers and fellow classmates.
History.s. 126, ch. 2002-387; s. 35, ch. 2003-391.
1003.32 Authority of teacher; responsibility for control of students; district school board and principal duties.Subject to law and to the rules of the district school board, each teacher or other member of the staff of any school shall have such authority for the control and discipline of students as may be assigned to him or her by the principal or the principal’s designated representative and shall keep good order in the classroom and in other places in which he or she is assigned to be in charge of students.
(1) In accordance with this section and within the framework of the district school board’s code of student conduct, teachers and other instructional personnel shall have the authority to undertake any of the following actions in managing student behavior and ensuring the safety of all students in their classes and school and their opportunity to learn in an orderly and disciplined classroom:
(a) Establish classroom rules of conduct.
(b) Establish and implement consequences, designed to change behavior, for infractions of classroom rules.
(c) Have disobedient, disrespectful, violent, abusive, uncontrollable, or disruptive students removed from the classroom for behavior management intervention.
(d) Have violent, abusive, uncontrollable, or disruptive students directed for information or assistance from appropriate school or district school board personnel.
(e) Assist in enforcing school rules on school property, during school-sponsored transportation, and during school-sponsored activities.
(f) Request and receive information as to the disposition of any referrals to the administration for violation of classroom or school rules.
(g) Request and receive immediate assistance in classroom management if a student becomes uncontrollable or in case of emergency.
(h) Request and receive training and other assistance to improve skills in classroom management, violence prevention, conflict resolution, and related areas.
(i) Press charges if there is a reason to believe that a crime has been committed on school property, during school-sponsored transportation, or during school-sponsored activities.
(j) Use reasonable force, according to standards adopted by the State Board of Education, to protect himself or herself or others from injury.
(k) Use corporal punishment according to school board policy and at least the following procedures, if a teacher feels that corporal punishment is necessary:
1. The use of corporal punishment shall be approved in principle by the principal before it is used, but approval is not necessary for each specific instance in which it is used. The principal shall prepare guidelines for administering such punishment which identify the types of punishable offenses, the conditions under which the punishment shall be administered, and the specific personnel on the school staff authorized to administer the punishment.
2. A teacher or principal may administer corporal punishment only in the presence of another adult who is informed beforehand, and in the student’s presence, of the reason for the punishment.
3. A teacher or principal who has administered punishment shall, upon request, provide the student’s parent with a written explanation of the reason for the punishment and the name of the other adult who was present.
(2) Teachers and other instructional personnel shall:
(a) Set and enforce reasonable classroom rules that treat all students equitably.
(b) Seek professional development to improve classroom management skills when data show that they are not effective in handling minor classroom disruptions.
(c) Maintain an orderly and disciplined classroom with a positive and effective learning environment that maximizes learning and minimizes disruption.
(d) Work with parents and other school personnel to solve discipline problems in their classrooms.
(3) A teacher may send a student to the principal’s office to maintain effective discipline in the classroom and may recommend an appropriate consequence consistent with the student code of conduct under s. 1006.07. The principal shall respond by employing the teacher’s recommended consequence or a more serious disciplinary action if the student’s history of disruptive behavior warrants it. If the principal determines that a lesser disciplinary action is appropriate, the principal should consult with the teacher prior to taking disciplinary action.
(4) A teacher may remove from class a student whose behavior the teacher determines interferes with the teacher’s ability to communicate effectively with the students in the class or with the ability of the student’s classmates to learn. Each district school board, each district school superintendent, and each school principal shall support the authority of teachers to remove disobedient, violent, abusive, uncontrollable, or disruptive students from the classroom.
(5) If a teacher removes a student from class under subsection (4), the principal may place the student in another appropriate classroom, in in-school suspension, or in a dropout prevention and academic intervention program as provided by s. 1003.53; or the principal may recommend the student for out-of-school suspension or expulsion, as appropriate. The student may be prohibited from attending or participating in school-sponsored or school-related activities. The principal may not return the student to that teacher’s class without the teacher’s consent unless the committee established under subsection (6) determines that such placement is the best or only available alternative. The teacher and the placement review committee must render decisions within 5 days of the removal of the student from the classroom.
(6)(a) Each school shall establish a placement review committee to determine placement of a student when a teacher withholds consent to the return of a student to the teacher’s class. A school principal must notify each teacher in that school about the availability, the procedures, and the criteria for the placement review committee as outlined in this section.
(b) The principal must report on a quarterly basis to the district school superintendent and district school board each incidence of a teacher’s withholding consent for a removed student to return to the teacher’s class and the disposition of the incident, and the superintendent must annually report these data to the department.
(c) The Commissioner of Education shall annually review each school district’s compliance with this section, and success in achieving orderly classrooms, and shall use all appropriate enforcement actions up to and including the withholding of disbursements from the Educational Enhancement Trust Fund until full compliance is verified.
(d) Placement review committee membership must include at least the following:
1. Two teachers, one selected by the school’s faculty and one selected by the teacher who has removed the student.
2. One member from the school’s staff who is selected by the principal.

The teacher who withheld consent to readmitting the student may not serve on the committee. The teacher and the placement review committee must render decisions within 5 days after the removal of the student from the classroom. If the placement review committee’s decision is contrary to the decision of the teacher to withhold consent to the return of the removed student to the teacher’s class, the teacher may appeal the committee’s decision to the district school superintendent.

(7) Any teacher who removes 25 percent of his or her total class enrollment shall be required to complete professional development to improve classroom management skills.
(8) Each teacher or other member of the staff of any school who knows or has reason to suspect that any person has committed, or has made a credible threat to commit, a crime of violence on school property shall report such knowledge or suspicion in accordance with the provisions of s. 1006.13. Each district school superintendent and each school principal shall fully support good faith reporting in accordance with the provisions of this subsection and s. 1006.13. Any person who makes a report required by this subsection in good faith shall be immune from civil or criminal liability for making the report.
(9) When knowledgeable of the likely risk of physical violence in the schools, the district school board shall take reasonable steps to ensure that teachers, other school staff, and students are not at undue risk of violence or harm.
History.s. 127, ch. 2002-387; s. 36, ch. 2003-391.
1003.33 Report cards; end-of-the-year status.
(1) Each district school board shall establish and publish policies requiring the content and regular issuance of student report cards for all elementary school, middle school, and high school students. These report cards must clearly depict and grade:
(a) The student’s academic performance in each class or course, which in grades 1 through 12 must be based upon examinations as well as written papers, class participation, and other academic performance criteria, and must include the student’s performance or nonperformance at his or her grade level.
(b) The student’s conduct and behavior.
(c) The student’s attendance, including absences and tardiness.
(2) A student’s final report card for a school year shall contain a statement indicating end-of-the-year status regarding performance or nonperformance at grade level, acceptable or unacceptable behavior and attendance, and promotion or nonpromotion.

District school boards shall not allow schools to exempt students from academic performance requirements based on practices or policies designed to encourage student attendance. A student’s attendance record may not be used in whole or in part to provide an exemption from any academic performance requirement.

History.s. 128, ch. 2002-387; s. 7, ch. 2003-118.
PART IV
PUBLIC K-12 EDUCATIONAL INSTRUCTION
1003.41 Next Generation Sunshine State Standards.
1003.4156 General requirements for middle grades promotion.
1003.42 Required instruction.
1003.4203 Digital materials, CAPE Digital Tool certificates, and technical assistance.
1003.4205 Disability history and awareness instruction.
1003.421 Recitation of the Declaration of Independence.
1003.4281 Early high school graduation.
1003.4282 Requirements for a standard high school diploma.
1003.4285 Standard high school diploma designations.
1003.4286 Award of standard high school diplomas to honorably discharged veterans.
1003.4295 Acceleration options.
1003.433 Learning opportunities for out-of-state and out-of-country transfer students and students needing additional instruction to meet high school graduation requirements.
1003.435 High school equivalency diploma program.
1003.436 Definition of “credit.”
1003.437 Middle and high school grading system.
1003.438 Special high school graduation requirements for certain exceptional students.
1003.44 Patriotic programs; rules.
1003.45 Permitting study of the Bible and religion; permitting brief meditation period.
1003.4505 Protection of school speech.
1003.451 Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps; military recruiters; access to public school campuses.
1003.453 School wellness and physical education policies; nutrition guidelines.
1003.455 Physical education; assessment.
1003.46 Health education; instruction in acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
1003.47 Biological experiments on living subjects.
1003.48 Instruction in operation of motor vehicles.
1003.49 Graduation and promotion requirements for publicly operated schools.
1003.491 Florida Career and Professional Education Act.
1003.492 Industry-certified career education programs.
1003.493 Career and professional academies and career-themed courses.
1003.4935 Middle grades career and professional academy courses and career-themed courses.
1003.497 Service learning.
1003.498 School district virtual course offerings.
1003.499 Florida Approved Courses and Tests (FACT) Initiative.
1003.4995 Fine arts report.
11003.41 Next Generation Sunshine State Standards.
(1) Next Generation Sunshine State Standards establish the core content of the curricula to be taught in the state and specify the core content knowledge and skills that K-12 public school students are expected to acquire. Standards must be rigorous and relevant and provide for the logical, sequential progression of core curricular content that incrementally increases a student’s core content knowledge and skills over time. Curricular content for all subjects must integrate critical-thinking, problem-solving, and workforce-literacy skills; communication, reading, and writing skills; mathematics skills; collaboration skills; contextual and applied-learning skills; technology-literacy skills; information and media-literacy skills; and civic-engagement skills. The standards must include distinct grade-level expectations for the core content knowledge and skills that a student is expected to have acquired by each individual grade level from kindergarten through grade 8. The standards for grades 9 through 12 may be organized by grade clusters of more than one grade level except as otherwise provided for visual and performing arts, physical education, health, and foreign language standards.
(2) Next Generation Sunshine State Standards must meet the following requirements:
(a) English Language Arts standards must establish specific curricular content for, at a minimum, reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language.
(b) Science standards must establish specific curricular content for, at a minimum, the nature of science, earth and space science, physical science, and life science.
(c) Mathematics standards must establish specific curricular content for, at a minimum, algebra, geometry, statistics and probability, number and quantity, functions, and modeling.
(d) Social Studies standards must establish specific curricular content for, at a minimum, geography, United States and world history, government, civics, humanities, and economics, including financial literacy. Financial literacy includes the knowledge, understanding, skills, behaviors, attitudes, and values that will enable a student to make responsible and effective financial decisions on a daily basis. Financial literacy instruction shall be an integral part of instruction throughout the entire economics course and include information regarding earning income; buying goods and services; saving and financial investing; taxes; the use of credit and credit cards; budgeting and debt management, including student loans and secured loans; banking and financial services; planning for one’s financial future, including higher education and career planning; credit reports and scores; and fraud and identity theft prevention.
(e) Visual and performing arts, physical education, health, and foreign language standards must establish specific curricular content and include distinct grade level expectations for the core content knowledge and skills that a student is expected to have acquired by each individual grade level from kindergarten through grade 5. The standards for grades 6 through 12 may be organized by grade clusters of more than one grade level.
(3) The Commissioner of Education, as needed, shall develop and submit proposed revisions to the standards for review and comment by Florida educators, school administrators, representatives of the Florida College System institutions and state universities who have expertise in the content knowledge and skills necessary to prepare a student for postsecondary education and careers, business and industry leaders, and the public. The commissioner, after considering reviews and comments, shall submit the proposed revisions to the State Board of Education for adoption.
(4) The State Board of Education shall adopt rules to administer this section.
History.s. 130, ch. 2002-387; s. 1, ch. 2008-235; s. 2, ch. 2010-48; s. 32, ch. 2011-5; s. 11, ch. 2013-27; s. 36, ch. 2014-39.
1Note.Section 6, ch. 2013-250, provides that “[f]ull implementation of online assessments for Next Generation Sunshine State Standards in English/language arts and mathematics adopted under s. 1003.41, Florida Statutes, for all kindergarten through grade 12 public school students shall occur only after the technology infrastructure, connectivity, and capacity of all public schools and school districts have been load tested and independently verified as ready for successful deployment and implementation.”
1003.4156 General requirements for middle grades promotion.
(1) In order for a student to be promoted to high school from a school that includes middle grades 6, 7, and 8, the student must successfully complete the following courses:
(a) Three middle grades or higher courses in English Language Arts (ELA).
(b) Three middle grades or higher courses in mathematics. Each school that includes middle grades must offer at least one high school level mathematics course for which students may earn high school credit. Successful completion of a high school level Algebra I or Geometry course is not contingent upon the student’s performance on the statewide, standardized end-of-course (EOC) assessment. To earn high school credit for Algebra I, a middle grades student must take the statewide, standardized Algebra I EOC assessment and pass the course, and in addition, beginning with the 2013-2014 school year and thereafter, a student’s performance on the Algebra I EOC assessment constitutes 30 percent of the student’s final course grade. To earn high school credit for a Geometry course, a middle grades student must take the statewide, standardized Geometry EOC assessment, which constitutes 30 percent of the student’s final course grade, and earn a passing grade in the course.
(c) Three middle grades or higher courses in social studies. Beginning with students entering grade 6 in the 2012-2013 school year, one of these courses must be at least a one-semester civics education course that includes the roles and responsibilities of federal, state, and local governments; the structures and functions of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government; and the meaning and significance of historic documents, such as the Articles of Confederation, the Declaration of Independence, and the Constitution of the United States. Beginning with the 2013-2014 school year, each student’s performance on the statewide, standardized EOC assessment in civics education required under s. 1008.22 constitutes 30 percent of the student’s final course grade. A middle grades student who transfers into the state’s public school system from out of country, out of state, a private school, or a home education program after the beginning of the second term of grade 8 is not required to meet the civics education requirement for promotion from the middle grades if the student’s transcript documents passage of three courses in social studies or two year-long courses in social studies that include coverage of civics education.
(d) Three middle grades or higher courses in science. Successful completion of a high school level Biology I course is not contingent upon the student’s performance on the statewide, standardized EOC assessment required under s. 1008.22. However, beginning with the 2012-2013 school year, to earn high school credit for a Biology I course, a middle grades student must take the statewide, standardized Biology I EOC assessment, which constitutes 30 percent of the student’s final course grade, and earn a passing grade in the course.
(e) One course in career and education planning to be completed in 6th, 7th, or 8th grade. The course may be taught by any member of the instructional staff. At a minimum, the course must be Internet-based, easy to use, and customizable to each student and include research-based assessments to assist students in determining educational and career options and goals. In addition, the course must result in a completed personalized academic and career plan for the student; must emphasize the importance of entrepreneurship skills; must emphasize technology or the application of technology in career fields; and, beginning in the 2014-2015 academic year, must include information from the Department of Economic Opportunity’s economic security report as described in s. 445.07. The required personalized academic and career plan must inform students of high school graduation requirements, including a detailed explanation of the diploma designation options provided under s. 1003.4285; high school assessment and college entrance test requirements; Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Program requirements; state university and Florida College System institution admission requirements; available opportunities to earn college credit in high school, including Advanced Placement courses; the International Baccalaureate Program; the Advanced International Certificate of Education Program; dual enrollment, including career dual enrollment; and career education courses, including career-themed courses and courses that lead to industry certification pursuant to s. 1003.492 or s. 1008.44.

Each school must inform parents about the course curriculum and activities. Each student shall complete a personal education plan that must be signed by the student and the student’s parent. The Department of Education shall develop course frameworks and professional development materials for the career and education planning course. The course may be implemented as a stand-alone course or integrated into another course or courses. The Commissioner of Education shall collect longitudinal high school course enrollment data by student ethnicity in order to analyze course-taking patterns.

(2) If a middle grades student scores Level l or Level 2 on the statewide, standardized Reading assessment or, when implemented, the English Language Arts (ELA) assessment, the following year the student must enroll in and complete a remedial course or a content area course in which remediation strategies are incorporated into course content delivery. The department shall provide guidance on appropriate strategies for diagnosing and meeting the varying instructional needs of students performing below grade level.
(3) If a middle grades student scores Level 1 or Level 2 on the statewide, standardized Mathematics assessment, the following year the student must receive remediation, which may be integrated into the student’s required mathematics courses.
(4) The State Board of Education shall adopt rules pursuant to ss. 120.536(1) and 120.54 to implement this section and may enforce this section pursuant to s. 1008.32.
History.s. 21, ch. 2006-74; s. 179, ch. 2008-4; s. 2, ch. 2010-22; s. 3, ch. 2010-48; s. 33, ch. 2011-5; s. 16, ch. 2011-175; s. 7, ch. 2012-134; s. 7, ch. 2012-191; s. 13, ch. 2013-27; s. 37, ch. 2014-39.
1003.42 Required instruction.
(1) Each district school board shall provide all courses required for middle grades promotion, high school graduation, and appropriate instruction designed to ensure that students meet State Board of Education adopted standards in the following subject areas: reading and other language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, foreign languages, health and physical education, and the arts. The state board must remove a middle grades course in the Course Code Directory that does not fully integrate all appropriate curricular content required by s. 1003.41 and may approve a new course only if it meets the required curricular content.
(2) Members of the instructional staff of the public schools, subject to the rules of the State Board of Education and the district school board, shall teach efficiently and faithfully, using the books and materials required that meet the highest standards for professionalism and historic accuracy, following the prescribed courses of study, and employing approved methods of instruction, the following:
(a) The history and content of the Declaration of Independence, including national sovereignty, natural law, self-evident truth, equality of all persons, limited government, popular sovereignty, and inalienable rights of life, liberty, and property, and how they form the philosophical foundation of our government.
(b) The history, meaning, significance, and effect of the provisions of the Constitution of the United States and amendments thereto, with emphasis on each of the 10 amendments that make up the Bill of Rights and how the constitution provides the structure of our government.
(c) The arguments in support of adopting our republican form of government, as they are embodied in the most important of the Federalist Papers.
(d) Flag education, including proper flag display and flag salute.
(e) The elements of civil government, including the primary functions of and interrelationships between the Federal Government, the state, and its counties, municipalities, school districts, and special districts.
(f) The history of the United States, including the period of discovery, early colonies, the War for Independence, the Civil War, the expansion of the United States to its present boundaries, the world wars, and the civil rights movement to the present. American history shall be viewed as factual, not as constructed, shall be viewed as knowable, teachable, and testable, and shall be defined as the creation of a new nation based largely on the universal principles stated in the Declaration of Independence.
(g) The history of the Holocaust (1933-1945), the systematic, planned annihilation of European Jews and other groups by Nazi Germany, a watershed event in the history of humanity, to be taught in a manner that leads to an investigation of human behavior, an understanding of the ramifications of prejudice, racism, and stereotyping, and an examination of what it means to be a responsible and respectful person, for the purposes of encouraging tolerance of diversity in a pluralistic society and for nurturing and protecting democratic values and institutions.
(h) The history of African Americans, including the history of African peoples before the political conflicts that led to the development of slavery, the passage to America, the enslavement experience, abolition, and the contributions of African Americans to society. Instructional materials shall include the contributions of African Americans to American society.
(i) The elementary principles of agriculture.
(j) The true effects of all alcoholic and intoxicating liquors and beverages and narcotics upon the human body and mind.
(k) Kindness to animals.
(l) The history of the state.
(m) The conservation of natural resources.
(n) Comprehensive health education that addresses concepts of community health; consumer health; environmental health; family life, including an awareness of the benefits of sexual abstinence as the expected standard and the consequences of teenage pregnancy; mental and emotional health; injury prevention and safety; Internet safety; nutrition; personal health; prevention and control of disease; and substance use and abuse. The health education curriculum for students in grades 7 through 12 shall include a teen dating violence and abuse component that includes, but is not limited to, the definition of dating violence and abuse, the warning signs of dating violence and abusive behavior, the characteristics of healthy relationships, measures to prevent and stop dating violence and abuse, and community resources available to victims of dating violence and abuse.
(o) Such additional materials, subjects, courses, or fields in such grades as are prescribed by law or by rules of the State Board of Education and the district school board in fulfilling the requirements of law.
(p) The study of Hispanic contributions to the United States.
(q) The study of women’s contributions to the United States.
(r) The nature and importance of free enterprise to the United States economy.
(s) A character-development program in the elementary schools, similar to Character First or Character Counts, which is secular in nature. Beginning in school year 2004-2005, the character-development program shall be required in kindergarten through grade 12. Each district school board shall develop or adopt a curriculum for the character-development program that shall be submitted to the department for approval. The character-development curriculum shall stress the qualities of patriotism; responsibility; citizenship; kindness; respect for authority, life, liberty, and personal property; honesty; charity; self-control; racial, ethnic, and religious tolerance; and cooperation.
(t) In order to encourage patriotism, the sacrifices that veterans have made in serving our country and protecting democratic values worldwide. Such instruction must occur on or before Veterans’ Day and Memorial Day. Members of the instructional staff are encouraged to use the assistance of local veterans when practicable.

The State Board of Education is encouraged to adopt standards and pursue assessment of the requirements of this subsection.

(3) Any student whose parent makes written request to the school principal shall be exempted from the teaching of reproductive health or any disease, including HIV/AIDS, its symptoms, development, and treatment. A student so exempted may not be penalized by reason of that exemption. Course descriptions for comprehensive health education shall not interfere with the local determination of appropriate curriculum which reflects local values and concerns.
History.s. 131, ch. 2002-387; s. 22, ch. 2006-74; s. 13, ch. 2010-154; s. 1, ch. 2010-217; s. 14, ch. 2011-220; s. 3, ch. 2014-184.
1003.4203 Digital materials, CAPE Digital Tool certificates, and technical assistance.
(1) DIGITAL MATERIALS.Each district school board, in consultation with the district school superintendent, shall make available digital materials, CAPE Digital Tool certificates, and CAPE industry certifications for students in prekindergarten through grade 12 in order to enable students to attain digital skills. The digital materials, CAPE Digital Tool certificates, and CAPE industry certifications may be integrated into subject area curricula, offered as a separate course, made available through open-access options, or deployed through online or digital computer applications.
(2) CAPE ESE DIGITAL TOOLS. Each district school board, in consultation with the district school superintendent, shall make available digital and instructional materials, including software applications, to students with disabilities who are in prekindergarten through grade 12. Beginning with the 2015-2016 school year:
(a) Digital materials may include CAPE Digital Tool certificates, workplace industry certifications, and OSHA industry certifications identified pursuant to s. 1008.44 for students with disabilities; and
(b) Each student’s individual educational plan for students with disabilities developed pursuant to this chapter must identify the CAPE Digital Tool certificates and CAPE industry certifications the student seeks to attain before high school graduation.
(3) CAPE DIGITAL TOOL CERTIFICATES. The department shall identify, by June 15 of each year, CAPE Digital Tool certificates that indicate a student’s digital skills. The department shall notify each school district when the certificates are available. The certificates shall be made available to all public elementary and middle grades students.
(a) Targeted skills to be mastered for the certificate include digital skills that are necessary to the student’s academic work and skills the student may need in future employment. The skills must include, but are not limited to, word processing; spreadsheets; presentations, including sound, motion, and color presentations; digital arts; cybersecurity; and coding consistent with CAPE industry certifications that are listed on the CAPE Industry Certification Funding List, pursuant to ss. 1003.492 and 1008.44. CAPE Digital Tool certificates earned by students are eligible for additional full-time equivalent membership pursuant to s. 1011.62(1)(o)1.a.
(b) The school district shall notify each middle school advisory council of the methods of delivery of the open-access content and assessments for the certificates. If there is no middle school advisory council, notification must be provided to the district advisory council.
(c) The Legislature intends that by July 1, 2018, on an annual basis, at least 75 percent of public middle grades students earn at least one CAPE Digital Tool certificate.
(4) CAPE INDUSTRY CERTIFICATIONS.
(a) CAPE industry certifications, issued to middle school and high school students, which do not articulate for college credit, are eligible for additional full-time equivalent membership pursuant to s. 1011.62(1)(o)1.b.
(b) CAPE industry certifications, issued to high school students, which articulate for college credit, are eligible for additional full-time equivalent membership pursuant to s. 1011.62(1)(o)1.b.
(5) CAPE INNOVATION AND CAPE ACCELERATION.
(a) CAPE Innovation.Up to five courses annually approved by the commissioner that combine academic and career content, and performance outcome expectations that, if achieved by a student, shall articulate for college credit and be eligible for additional full-time equivalent membership pursuant to s. 1011.62(1)(o)1.c. Such approved courses must incorporate at least two third-party assessments that, if successfully completed by a student, shall articulate for college credit. At least one of the two third-party assessments must be associated with an industry certification that is identified on the CAPE Industry Certification Funding List. Each course that is approved by the commissioner must be specifically identified in the Course Code Directory as a CAPE Innovation Course.
(b) CAPE Acceleration.Industry certifications, annually approved by the commissioner, that articulate for 15 or more college credit hours and, if successfully completed, shall be eligible for additional full-time equivalent membership pursuant to s. 1011.62(1)(o)1.d. Each approved industry certification must be specifically identified in the CAPE Industry Certification Funding List as a CAPE Acceleration Industry Certification.
(6) GRADE POINT AVERAGE CALCULATION.For purposes of calculating grade point average, a grade in a course that is level 3 or above and leads to an industry certification must be weighted the same as a grade in an honors course.
(7) TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE.
(a) The Department of Education shall collaborate with Florida educators and school leaders to provide technical assistance to district school boards in the implementation of this section. Technical assistance to districts shall include, but is not limited to, identification of digital resources, primarily open-access resources, including digital curriculum, instructional materials, media assets, and other digital tools and applications; training mechanisms for teachers and others to facilitate integration of digital resources and technologies into instructional strategies; and model policies and procedures that support sustainable implementation practices.
(b) Public schools may provide students with access to third-party assessment centers and career and professional academy curricula in a digital format in support of CAPE Digital Tool certificates and CAPE industry certifications, pursuant to this section and s. 1008.44, to assist public schools and school districts to establish Florida Digital Classrooms.
(8) PARTNERSHIPS.
(a) A district school board may seek partnerships with other school districts, private businesses, postsecondary institutions, or consultants to offer classes and instruction to teachers and students to assist the school district in providing digital materials, CAPE Digital Tool certificates, and CAPE industry certifications established pursuant to this section.
(b) Third-party assessment providers and career and professional academy curricula providers are encouraged to provide annual training to staff of the Department of Education, staff of school district offices, instructional staff of public schools, including charter schools, and other appropriate administrative staff through face-to-face training models; 1through online, video conferencing training models; and through state, regional, or conference presentations.
(9) RULES.The State Board of Education shall adopt rules to administer this section.
History.s. 17, ch. 2011-175; s. 14, ch. 2013-27; s. 4, ch. 2014-184.
1Note.The word “through” was inserted by the editors to improve clarity.
1003.4205 Disability history and awareness instruction.
(1) Each district school board may provide disability history and awareness instruction in all K-12 public schools in the district during the first 2 weeks in October each year. The district school board shall designate these 2 weeks as “Disability History and Awareness Weeks.”
(2)(a) During this 2-week period, students may be provided intensive instruction to expand their knowledge, understanding, and awareness of individuals with disabilities, the history of disability, and the disability rights movement. Disability history may include the events and timelines of the development and evolution of services to, and the civil rights of, individuals with disabilities. Disability history may also include the contributions of specific individuals with disabilities, including the contributions of acknowledged national leaders.
(b) The instruction may be integrated into the existing school curriculum in ways including, but not limited to, supplementing lesson plans, holding school assemblies, or providing other school-related activities. The instruction may be delivered by qualified school personnel or by knowledgeable guest speakers, with a particular focus on including individuals with disabilities.
(3) The goals of disability history and awareness instruction include:
(a) Better treatment for individuals with disabilities, especially for youth in school, and increased attention to preventing the bullying or harassment of students with disabilities.
(b) Encouragement to individuals with disabilities to develop increased self-esteem, resulting in more individuals with disabilities gaining pride in being an individual with a disability, obtaining postsecondary education, entering the workforce, and contributing to their communities.
(c) Reaffirmation of the local, state, and federal commitment to the full inclusion in society of, and the equal opportunity for, all individuals with disabilities.
History.s. 1, ch. 2008-156.
1003.421 Recitation of the Declaration of Independence.
(1) To educate students about the sacrifices made for freedom in the founding of this country and the values on which this country was founded, the last full week of classes in September shall be recognized in public schools as Celebrate Freedom Week. Celebrate Freedom Week must include at least 3 hours of appropriate instruction in each social studies class, as determined by each school district, which instruction shall include an in-depth study of the intent, meaning, and importance of the Declaration of Independence.
(2) To emphasize the importance of this week, at the beginning of each school day or in homeroom, during the last full week of September, public school principals and teachers shall conduct an oral recitation by students of the following words of the Declaration of Independence: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. That to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.”
(3) Student recitation of this statement shall serve to reaffirm the American ideals of individual liberty.
(4) Upon written request by a student’s parent, the student must be excused from the recitation of the Declaration of Independence.
History.s. 1, ch. 2002-213.
11003.4281 Early high school graduation.
(1) The purpose of this section is to provide a student the option of early graduation and receipt of a standard high school diploma if the student earns 24 credits and meets the graduation requirements set forth in s. 1003.4282. For purposes of this section, the term “early graduation” means graduation from high school in less than 8 semesters or the equivalent.
(2) Each district school board shall adopt a policy that provides a high school student the option of early graduation. Each school district shall notify the parent of a student who is eligible to graduate early. A school district may not prohibit a student who meets the requirements of this section from graduating early.
(3) A student who graduates early may continue to participate in school activities and social events and attend and participate in graduation events with the student’s cohort, as if the student were still enrolled in high school. A student who graduates early will be included in class ranking, honors, and award determinations for the student’s cohort. A student who graduates early must comply with district school board rules and policies regarding access to the school facilities and grounds during normal operating hours.
(4) If eligible for a Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Program award under ss. 1009.53-1009.538, a student who graduates from high school midyear may receive an initial award in the spring term following the student’s graduation.
History.s. 9, ch. 2012-191; s. 16, ch. 2013-27; s. 39, ch. 2014-39; s. 5, ch. 2014-184.
1Note.Section 43, ch. 2013-27, provides that “[a]ny student who selected and is participating in an accelerated high school graduation option under s. 1003.429, Florida Statutes, before July 1, 2013, may continue that option, and all statutory program requirements of the accelerated high school option shall remain applicable to the student as long as the student continues participation in the option.”
1003.4282 Requirements for a standard high school diploma.
(1) TWENTY-FOUR CREDITS REQUIRED.
(a) Beginning with students entering grade 9 in the 2013-2014 school year, receipt of a standard high school diploma requires successful completion of 24 credits, an International Baccalaureate curriculum, or an Advanced International Certificate of Education curriculum.
(b) The required credits may be earned through equivalent, applied, or integrated courses or career education courses as defined in s. 1003.01(4), including work-related internships approved by the State Board of Education and identified in the course code directory. However, any must-pass assessment requirements must be met. An equivalent course is one or more courses identified by content-area experts as being a match to the core curricular content of another course, based upon review of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards for that subject. An applied course aligns with Next Generation Sunshine State Standards and includes real-world applications of a career and technical education standard used in business or industry. An integrated course includes content from several courses within a content area or across content areas.
(2) NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS.The school district must notify students and parents, in writing, of the requirements for a standard high school diploma, available designations, and the eligibility requirements for state scholarship programs and postsecondary admissions. The Department of Education shall directly and through the school districts notify registered private schools of public high school course credit and assessment requirements. Each private school must make this information available to students and their parents so they are aware of public high school graduation requirements.
(3) STANDARD HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA; COURSE AND ASSESSMENT REQUIREMENTS.
(a) Four credits in English Language Arts (ELA).The four credits must be in ELA I, II, III, and IV. A student must pass the statewide, standardized grade 10 Reading assessment or, when implemented, the grade 10 ELA assessment, or earn a concordant score, in order to earn a standard high school diploma.
(b) Four credits in mathematics.A student must earn one credit in Algebra I and one credit in Geometry. A student’s performance on the statewide, standardized Algebra I end-of-course (EOC) assessment constitutes 30 percent of the student’s final course grade. A student must pass the statewide, standardized Algebra I EOC assessment, or earn a comparative score, in order to earn a standard high school diploma. A student’s performance on the statewide, standardized Geometry EOC assessment constitutes 30 percent of the student’s final course grade. If the state administers a statewide, standardized Algebra II assessment, a student selecting Algebra II must take the assessment, and the student’s performance on the assessment constitutes 30 percent of the student’s final course grade. A student who earns an industry certification for which there is a statewide college credit articulation agreement approved by the State Board of Education may substitute the certification for one mathematics credit. Substitution may occur for up to two mathematics credits, except for Algebra I and Geometry.
(c) Three credits in science.Two of the three required credits must have a laboratory component. A student must earn one credit in Biology I and two credits in equally rigorous courses. The statewide, standardized Biology I EOC assessment constitutes 30 percent of the student’s final course grade. A student who earns an industry certification for which there is a statewide college credit articulation agreement approved by the State Board of Education may substitute the certification for one science credit, except for Biology I.
(d) Three credits in social studies.A student must earn one credit in United States History; one credit in World History; one-half credit in economics, which must include financial literacy; and one-half credit in United States Government. The United States History EOC assessment constitutes 30 percent of the student’s final course grade.
(e) One credit in fine or performing arts, speech and debate, or practical arts.The practical arts course must incorporate artistic content and techniques of creativity, interpretation, and imagination. Eligible practical arts courses are identified in the Course Code Directory.
(f) One credit in physical education.Physical education must include the integration of health. Participation in an interscholastic sport at the junior varsity or varsity level for two full seasons shall satisfy the one-credit requirement in physical education if the student passes a competency test on personal fitness with a score of “C” or better. The competency test on personal fitness developed by the Department of Education must be used. A district school board may not require that the one credit in physical education be taken during the 9th grade year. Completion of one semester with a grade of “C” or better in a marching band class, in a physical activity class that requires participation in marching band activities as an extracurricular activity, or in a dance class shall satisfy one-half credit in physical education or one-half credit in performing arts. This credit may not be used to satisfy the personal fitness requirement or the requirement for adaptive physical education under an individual education plan (IEP) or 504 plan. Completion of 2 years in a Reserve Officer Training Corps (R.O.T.C.) class, a significant component of which is drills, shall satisfy the one-credit requirement in physical education and the one-credit requirement in performing arts. This credit may not be used to satisfy the personal fitness requirement or the requirement for adaptive physical education under an IEP or 504 plan.
(g) Eight credits in electives.School districts must develop and offer coordinated electives so that a student may develop knowledge and skills in his or her area of interest, such as electives with a STEM or liberal arts focus. Such electives must include opportunities for students to earn college credit, including industry-certified career education programs or series of career-themed courses that result in industry certification or articulate into the award of college credit, or career education courses for which there is a statewide or local articulation agreement and which lead to college credit.
(4) ONLINE COURSE REQUIREMENT. At least one course within the 24 credits required under this section must be completed through online learning. A school district may not require a student to take the online course outside the school day or in addition to a student’s courses for a given semester. An online course taken in grade 6, grade 7, or grade 8 fulfills this requirement. This requirement is met through an online course offered by the Florida Virtual School, a virtual education provider approved by the State Board of Education, a high school, or an online dual enrollment course. A student who is enrolled in a full-time or part-time virtual instruction program under s. 1002.45 meets this requirement. This requirement does not apply to a student who has an individual education plan under s. 1003.57 which indicates that an online course would be inappropriate or to an out-of-state transfer student who is enrolled in a Florida high school and has 1 academic year or less remaining in high school.
(5) REMEDIATION FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS.
(a) Each year a student scores Level 1 or Level 2 on the statewide, standardized grade 9 or grade 10 Reading assessment or, when implemented, the grade 9, grade 10, or grade 11 ELA assessment, the student must be enrolled in and complete an intensive remedial course the following year or be placed in a content area course that includes remediation of skills not acquired by the student.
(b) Each year a student scores Level 1 or Level 2 on the statewide, standardized Algebra I EOC assessment, the student must be enrolled in and complete an intensive remedial course the following year or be placed in a content area course that includes remediation of skills not acquired by the student.
(6) GRADE FORGIVENESS POLICY.Each district school board shall adopt policies designed to assist students in meeting graduation requirements including grade forgiveness policies. Forgiveness policies for required courses shall be limited to replacing a grade of “D” or “F” with a grade of “C” or higher earned subsequently in the same or comparable course. Forgiveness policies for elective courses shall be limited to replacing a grade of “D” or “F” with a grade of “C” or higher earned subsequently in another course. The only exception to these forgiveness policies shall be made for a student in the middle grades who takes any high school course for high school credit and earns a grade of “C,” “D,” or “F”. In such case, the district forgiveness policy must allow the replacement of the grade with a grade of “C” or higher earned subsequently in the same or comparable course. In all cases of grade forgiveness, only the new grade shall be used in the calculation of the student’s grade point average. Any course grade not replaced according to a district school board forgiveness policy shall be included in the calculation of the cumulative grade point average required for graduation.
(7) AWARD OF A STANDARD HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA.
(a) A student who earns a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale and meets the requirements of this section or s. 1002.3105(5) shall be awarded a standard high school diploma in a form prescribed by the State Board of Education.
(b) An adult student in an adult general education program as provided under s. 1004.93 shall be awarded a standard high school diploma if the student meets the requirements of this section or s. 1002.3105(5), except that:
1. One elective credit may be substituted for the one-credit requirement in fine or performing arts, speech and debate, or practical arts.
2. The requirement that two of the science credits include a laboratory component may be waived by the district school board.
3. The one credit in physical education may be substituted with an elective credit.
(c) A student who earns the required 24 credits, or the required 18 credits under s. 1002.3105(5), but fails to pass the assessments required under s. 1008.22(3) or achieve a 2.0 GPA shall be awarded a certificate of completion in a form prescribed by the State Board of Education. However, a student who is otherwise entitled to a certificate of completion may elect to remain in high school either as a full-time student or a part-time student for up to 1 additional year and receive special instruction designed to remedy his or her identified deficiencies.
(8) UNIFORM TRANSFER OF HIGH SCHOOL CREDITS.Beginning with the 2012-2013 school year, if a student transfers to a Florida public high school from out of country, out of state, a private school, or a home education program and the student’s transcript shows a credit in Algebra I, the student must pass the statewide, standardized Algebra I EOC assessment in order to earn a standard high school diploma unless the student earned a comparative score, passed a statewide assessment in Algebra I administered by the transferring entity, or passed the statewide mathematics assessment the transferring entity uses to satisfy the requirements of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, 20 U.S.C. s. 6301. If a student’s transcript shows a credit in high school reading or English Language Arts II or III, in order to earn a standard high school diploma, the student must take and pass the statewide, standardized grade 10 Reading assessment or, when implemented, the grade 10 ELA assessment, or earn a concordant score. If a transfer student’s transcript shows a final course grade and course credit in Algebra I, Geometry, Biology I, or United States History, the transferring course final grade and credit shall be honored without the student taking the requisite statewide, standardized EOC assessment and without the assessment results constituting 30 percent of the student’s final course grade.
(9) CAREER EDUCATION COURSES THAT SATISFY HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT REQUIREMENTS.
(a) Participation in career education courses engages students in their high school education, increases academic achievement, enhances employability, and increases postsecondary success. By July 1, 2014, the department shall develop, for approval by the State Board of Education, multiple, additional career education courses or a series of courses that meet the requirements set forth in s. 1003.493(2), (4), and (5) and this subsection and allow students to earn credit in both the career education course and courses required for high school graduation under this section and s. 1003.4281.
1. The state board must determine if sufficient academic standards are covered to warrant the award of academic credit.
2. Career education courses must include workforce and digital literacy skills and the integration of required course content with practical applications and designated rigorous coursework that results in one or more industry certifications or clearly articulated credit or advanced standing in a 2-year or 4-year certificate or degree program, which may include high school junior and senior year work-related internships or apprenticeships. The department shall negotiate state licenses for material and testing for industry certifications. The instructional methodology used in these courses must be comprised of authentic projects, problems, and activities for contextually learning the academics.
(b) Each school district should take the initiative to work with local workforce boards, local business and industry leaders, and postsecondary institutions to establish partnerships for the purpose of creating career education courses or a series of courses that meet the requirements set forth in s. 1003.493(2), (4), and (5) that students can take to earn required high school course credits. Emphasis should be placed on online coursework and digital literacy. School districts must submit their recommended career education courses to the department for state board approval. School district-recommended career education courses must meet the same rigorous standards as department-developed career education courses in order to be approved by the state board. School districts participating in the development of rigorous career education courses will be able to better address local workforce needs and allow students the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills that are needed not only for academic advancement but also for employability purposes.
(c) Regional consortium service organizations established pursuant to s. 1001.451 shall work with school districts, local workforce boards, postsecondary institutions, and local business and industry leaders to create career education courses that meet the requirements set forth in s. 1003.493(2), (4), and (5) and this subsection that students can take to earn required high school course credits. The regional consortium shall submit course recommendations to the department, on behalf of the consortium member districts, for state board approval. A strong emphasis should be placed on online coursework, digital literacy, and workforce literacy as defined in s. 1004.02(26). For purposes of providing students the opportunity to earn industry certifications, consortiums must secure the necessary site licenses and testing contracts for use by member districts.
(10) COHORT TRANSITION TO NEW GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS.The requirements of this section, in addition to applying to students entering grade 9 in the 2013-2014 school year and thereafter, shall also apply to students entering grade 9 before the 2013-2014 school year, except as otherwise provided in this subsection.
(a) A student entering grade 9 before the 2010-2011 school year must earn:
1. Four credits in English/ELA. A student must pass the statewide, standardized grade 10 Reading assessment, or earn a concordant score, in order to graduate with a standard high school diploma.
2. Four credits in mathematics, which must include Algebra I. A student must pass grade 10 FCAT Mathematics, or earn a concordant score, in order to graduate with a standard high school diploma. A student who takes Algebra I or Geometry after the 2010-2011 school year must take the statewide, standardized EOC assessment for the course but is not required to pass the assessment in order to earn course credit. A student’s performance on the Algebra I or Geometry EOC assessment is not required to constitute 30 percent of the student’s final course grade. A student who earns an industry certification for which there is a statewide college credit articulation agreement approved by the State Board of Education may substitute the certification for one mathematics credit. Substitution may occur for up to two mathematics credits, except for Algebra I.
3. Three credits in science, two of which must have a laboratory component. A student who takes Biology I after the 2010-2011 school year must take the statewide, standardized Biology I EOC assessment but is not required to pass the assessment in order to earn course credit. A student’s performance on the assessment is not required to constitute 30 percent of the student’s final course grade. A student who earns an industry certification for which there is a statewide college credit articulation agreement approved by the State Board of Education may substitute the certification for one science credit.
4. Three credits in social studies of which one credit in World History, one credit in United States History, one-half credit in United States Government, and one-half credit in economics are required. A student who takes United States History after the 2011-2012 school year must take the statewide, standardized United States History EOC assessment, but the student’s performance on the assessment is not required to constitute 30 percent of the student’s final course grade.
5. One credit in fine or performing arts, speech and debate, or practical arts as provided in paragraph (3)(e).
6. One credit in physical education as provided in paragraph (3)(f).
7. Eight credits in electives.
(b) A student entering grade 9 in the 2010-2011 school year must earn:
1. Four credits in English/ELA. A student must pass the statewide, standardized grade 10 Reading assessment, or earn a concordant score, in order to graduate with a standard high school diploma.
2. Four credits in mathematics, which must include Algebra I and Geometry. The statewide, standardized Algebra I EOC assessment constitutes 30 percent of the student’s final course grade. A student who takes Algebra I or Geometry after the 2010-2011 school year must take the statewide, standardized EOC assessment for the course but is not required to pass the assessment in order to earn course credit. A student’s performance on the Geometry EOC assessment is not required to constitute 30 percent of the student’s final course grade. A student who earns an industry certification for which there is a statewide college credit articulation agreement approved by the State Board of Education may substitute the certification for one mathematics credit. Substitution may occur for up to two mathematics credits, except for Algebra I and Geometry.
3. Three credits in science, two of which must have a laboratory component. A student who takes Biology I after the 2010-2011 school year must take the statewide, standardized Biology I EOC assessment but is not required to pass the assessment in order to earn course credit. A student’s performance on the assessment is not required to constitute 30 percent of the student’s final course grade. A student who earns an industry certification for which there is a statewide college credit articulation agreement approved by the State Board of Education may substitute the certification for one science credit, except for Biology I.
4. Three credits in social studies of which one credit in World History, one credit in United States History, one-half credit in United States Government, and one-half credit in economics are required. A student who takes United States History after the 2011-2012 school year must take the statewide, standardized United States History EOC assessment, but the student’s performance on the assessment is not required to constitute 30 percent of the student’s final course grade.
5. One credit in fine or performing arts, speech and debate, or practical arts as provided in paragraph (3)(e).
6. One credit in physical education as provided in paragraph (3)(f).
7. Eight credits in electives.
(c) A student entering grade 9 in the 2011-2012 school year must earn:
1. Four credits in English/ELA. A student must pass the statewide, standardized grade 10 Reading assessment, or earn a concordant score, in order to graduate with a standard high school diploma.
2. Four credits in mathematics, which must include Algebra I and Geometry. A student who takes Algebra I after the 2010-2011 school year must pass the statewide, standardized Algebra I EOC assessment, or earn a comparative score, in order to earn a standard high school diploma. A student who takes Algebra I or Geometry after the 2010-2011 school year must take the statewide, standardized EOC assessment but is not required to pass the Algebra I or Geometry EOC assessment in order to earn course credit. A student’s performance on the Algebra I or Geometry EOC assessment is not required to constitute 30 percent of the student’s final course grade. A student who earns an industry certification for which there is a statewide college credit articulation agreement approved by the State Board of Education may substitute the certification for one mathematics credit. Substitution may occur for up to two mathematics credits, except for Algebra I and Geometry.
3. Three credits in science, two of which must have a laboratory component. One of the science credits must be Biology I. A student who takes Biology I after the 2010-2011 school year must take the statewide, standardized Biology I EOC assessment but is not required to pass the assessment in order to earn course credit. A student’s performance on the assessment is not required to constitute 30 percent of the student’s final course grade. A student who earns an industry certification for which there is a statewide college credit articulation agreement approved by the State Board of Education may substitute the certification for one science credit, except for Biology I.
4. Three credits in social studies of which one credit in World History, one credit in United States History, one-half credit in United States Government, and one-half credit in economics are required. A student who takes United States History after the 2011-2012 school 1year must take the statewide, standardized United States History EOC assessment, but the student’s performance on the assessment is not required to constitute 30 percent of the student’s final course grade.
5. One credit in fine or performing arts, speech and debate, or practical arts as provided in paragraph (3)(e).
6. One credit in physical education as provided in paragraph (3)(f).
7. Eight credits in electives.
8. One online course as provided in subsection (4).
(d) A student entering grade 9 in the 2012-2013 school year must earn:
1. Four credits in English/ELA. A student must pass the statewide, standardized grade 10 Reading assessment, or earn a concordant score, in order to graduate with a standard high school diploma.
2. Four credits in mathematics, which must include Algebra I and Geometry. A student who takes Algebra I after the 2010-2011 school year must pass the statewide, standardized Algebra I EOC assessment, or earn a comparative score, in order to earn a standard high school diploma. A student who takes Geometry after the 2010-2011 school year must take the statewide, standardized Geometry EOC assessment. A student is not required to pass the statewide, standardized EOC assessment in Algebra I or Geometry in order to earn course credit. A student’s performance on the Algebra I or Geometry EOC assessment is not required to constitute 30 percent of the student’s final course grade. A student who earns an industry certification for which there is a statewide college credit articulation agreement approved by the State Board of Education may substitute the certification for one mathematics credit. Substitution may occur for up to two mathematics credits, except for Algebra I and Geometry.
3. Three credits in science, two of which must have a laboratory component. One of the science credits must be Biology I. A student who takes Biology I after the 2010-2011 school year must take the statewide, standardized Biology I EOC assessment but is not required to pass the assessment to earn course credit. A student’s performance on the assessment is not required to constitute 30 percent of the student’s final course grade. A student who earns an industry certification for which there is a statewide college credit articulation agreement approved by the State Board of Education may substitute the certification for one science credit, except for Biology I.
4. Three credits in social studies of which one credit in World History, one credit in United States History, one-half credit in United States Government, and one-half credit in economics are required. The statewide, standardized United States History EOC assessment constitutes 30 percent of the student’s final course grade.
5. One credit in fine or performing arts, speech and debate, or practical arts as provided in paragraph (3)(e).
6. One credit in physical education as provided in paragraph (3)(f).
7. Eight credits in electives.
8. One online course as provided in subsection (4).
(e) Policy adopted in rule by the district school board may require for any cohort of students that performance on a statewide, standardized EOC assessment constitute 30 percent of a student’s final course grade.
(f) This subsection is repealed July 1, 2020.
(11) STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES.Beginning with students entering grade 9 in the 2014-2015 school year, this subsection applies to a student with a disability.
(a) A parent of the student with a disability shall, in collaboration with the individual education plan (IEP) team during the transition planning process pursuant to s. 1003.5716, declare an intent for the student to graduate from high school with either a standard high school diploma or a certificate of completion. A student with a disability who does not satisfy the standard high school diploma requirements pursuant to this section shall be awarded a certificate of completion.
(b) The following options, in addition to the other options specified in this section, may be used to satisfy the standard high school diploma requirements, as specified in the student’s individual education plan:
1. For a student with a disability for whom the IEP team has determined that the Florida Alternate Assessment is the most appropriate measure of the student’s skills:
a. A combination of course substitutions, assessments, industry certifications, other acceleration options, or occupational completion points appropriate to the student’s unique skills and abilities that meet the criteria established by State Board of Education rule.
b. A portfolio of quantifiable evidence that documents a student’s mastery of academic standards through rigorous metrics established by State Board of Education rule. A portfolio may include, but is not limited to, documentation of work experience, internships, community service, and postsecondary credit.
2. For a student with a disability for whom the IEP team has determined that mastery of academic and employment competencies is the most appropriate way for a student to demonstrate his or her skills:
a. Documented completion of the minimum high school graduation requirements, including the number of course credits prescribed by rules of the State Board of Education.
b. Documented achievement of all annual goals and short-term objectives for academic and employment competencies, industry certifications, and occupational completion points specified in the student’s transition plan. The documentation must be verified by the IEP team.
c. Documented successful employment for the number of hours per week specified in the student’s transition plan, for the equivalent of 1 semester, and payment of a minimum wage in compliance with the requirements of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act.
d. Documented mastery of the academic and employment competencies, industry certifications, and occupational completion points specified in the student’s transition plan. The documentation must be verified by the IEP team, the employer, and the teacher. The transition plan must be developed and signed by the student, parent, teacher, and employer before placement in employment and must identify the following:
(I) The expected academic and employment competencies, industry certifications, and occupational completion points;
(II) The criteria for determining and certifying mastery of the competencies;
(III) The work schedule and the minimum number of hours to be worked per week; and
(IV) A description of the supervision to be provided by the school district.
3. Any change to the high school graduation option specified in the student’s IEP must be approved by the parent and is subject to verification for appropriateness by an independent reviewer selected by the parent as provided in s. 1003.572.
(c) A student with a disability who meets the standard high school diploma requirements in this section may defer the receipt of a standard high school diploma if the student:
1. Has an individual education plan that prescribes special education, transition planning, transition services, or related services through age 21; and
2. Is enrolled in accelerated college credit instruction pursuant to s. 1007.27, industry certification courses that lead to college credit, a collegiate high school program, courses necessary to satisfy the Scholar designation requirements, or a structured work-study, internship, or preapprenticeship program.
(d) A student with a disability who receives a certificate of completion and has an individual education plan that prescribes special education, transition planning, transition services, or related services through 21 years of age may continue to receive the specified instruction and services.
(e) Any waiver of the statewide, standardized assessment requirements by the individual education plan team, pursuant to s. 1008.22(3)(c), must be approved by the parent and is subject to verification for appropriateness by an independent reviewer selected by the parent as provided for in s. 1003.572.

2The State Board of Education shall adopt rules under ss. 120.536(1) and 120.54 to implement this paragraph, including rules that establish the minimum requirements for students described in this paragraph to earn a standard high school diploma. The State Board of Education shall adopt emergency rules pursuant to ss. 120.536(1) and 120.54.

(12) RULES.The State Board of Education shall adopt rules to implement this section.
History.s. 17, ch. 2013-27; s. 40, ch. 2014-39; ss. 33, 34, ch. 2014-184.
1Note.The word “student” following the word “year” was deleted by the editors.
2Note.Similar language to what became subsection (11) appears in s. 5, C.S. for C.S. for S.B. 1512, which did not pass; in that text, the flush left language appeared after paragraph (b) of the subsection. The language was inserted after paragraph (e) in C.S. for C.S. for S.B. 850, which became ch. 2014-184.
1003.4285 Standard high school diploma designations.
(1) Each standard high school diploma shall include, as applicable, the following designations if the student meets the criteria set forth for the designation:
(a) Scholar designation.In addition to the requirements of s. 1003.4282, in order to earn the Scholar designation, a student must satisfy the following requirements:
1. English Language Arts (ELA).Beginning with students entering grade 9 in the 2014-2015 school year, pass the statewide, standardized grade 11 ELA assessment.
2. Mathematics.Earn one credit in Algebra II and one credit in statistics or an equally rigorous course. Beginning with students entering grade 9 in the 2014-2015 school year, pass the Algebra II and Geometry statewide, standardized assessments.
3. Science.Pass the statewide, standardized Biology I EOC assessment and earn one credit in chemistry or physics and one credit in a course equally rigorous to chemistry or physics. However, a student enrolled in an Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), or Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE) Biology course who takes the respective AP, IB, or AICE Biology assessment and earns the minimum score necessary to earn college credit as identified pursuant to s. 1007.27(2) meets the requirement of this subparagraph without having to take the statewide, standardized Biology I EOC assessment.
4. Social studies.Pass the statewide, standardized United States History EOC assessment. However, a student enrolled in an AP, IB, or AICE course that includes United States History topics who takes the respective AP, IB, or AICE assessment and earns the minimum score necessary to earn college credit as identified pursuant to s. 1007.27(2) meets the requirement of this subparagraph without having to take the statewide, standardized United States History EOC assessment.
5. Foreign language.Earn two credits in the same foreign language.
6. Electives.Earn at least one credit in an Advanced Placement, an International Baccalaureate, an Advanced International Certificate of Education, or a dual enrollment course.
(b) Merit designation.In addition to the requirements of s. 1003.4282, in order to earn the Merit designation, a student must attain one or more industry certifications from the list established under s. 1003.492.
(2) Students and parents shall be provided information about diploma designations through an online education and career planning tool, which allows students to monitor their progress toward the attainment of each designation.
(3) The State Board of Education may make recommendations to the Legislature regarding the establishment of additional designations.
History.s. 8, ch. 2008-235; s. 4, ch. 2009-40; s. 464, ch. 2011-142; s. 18, ch. 2013-27; s. 8, ch. 2013-35; s. 41, ch. 2014-39.
1003.4286 Award of standard high school diplomas to honorably discharged veterans.Pursuant to rules adopted by the State Board of Education in consultation with the Department of Military Affairs, the Commissioner of Education may award a standard high school diploma to an honorably discharged veteran who has not completed high school graduation requirements.
History.s. 19, ch. 2013-27.
1003.4295 Acceleration options.
(1) Each high school shall advise each student of courses through which a high school student can earn college credit, including Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, Advanced International Certificate of Education, dual enrollment, early admission, and career academy courses and courses that lead to industry certification, as well as the availability of course offerings through virtual instruction. Students shall also be advised of the early graduation options under s. 1003.4281.
(2) Beginning with the 2011-2012 school year, each high school shall offer an International Baccalaureate Program, an Advanced International Certificate of Education Program, or a combination of at least four courses in dual enrollment or Advanced Placement, including one course each in English, mathematics, science, and social studies. To meet this requirement, school districts may provide courses through virtual instruction, if the virtual course significantly integrates postsecondary level content for which a student may earn college credit, as determined by the Department of Education, and for which a standardized end-of-course assessment, as approved by the department, is administered.
(3) The Credit Acceleration Program (CAP) is created for the purpose of allowing a student to earn high school credit in Algebra I, Algebra II, geometry, United States history, or biology if the student passes the statewide, standardized assessment administered under s. 1008.22. Notwithstanding s. 1003.436, a school district shall award course credit to a student who is not enrolled in the course, or who has not completed the course, if the student attains a passing score on the corresponding statewide, standardized assessment. The school district shall permit a student who is not enrolled in the course, or who has not completed the course, to take the assessment during the regular administration of the assessment.
History.s. 5, ch. 2010-22; s. 10, ch. 2012-191; s. 21, ch. 2013-27.
1003.433 Learning opportunities for out-of-state and out-of-country transfer students and students needing additional instruction to meet high school graduation requirements.
(1) Students who enter a Florida public school at the 11th or 12th grade from out of state or out of country shall not be required to spend additional time in a Florida public school in order to meet the high school course requirements if the student has met all requirements of the school district, state, or country from which he or she is transferring. Such students who are not proficient in English should receive immediate and intensive instruction in English language acquisition. However, to receive a standard high school diploma, a transfer student must earn a 2.0 grade point average and meet the requirements under s. 1008.22.
(2) Students who earn the required 24 credits for the standard high school diploma except for passage of any must-pass assessment under s. 1003.4282 or s. 1008.22 or an alternate assessment by the end of grade 12 must be provided the following learning opportunities:
(a) Participation in an accelerated high school equivalency diploma preparation program during the summer.
(b) Upon receipt of a certificate of completion, be allowed to take the College Placement Test and be admitted to developmental education or credit courses at a Florida College System institution, as appropriate.
(c) Participation in an adult general education program as provided in s. 1004.93 for such time as the student requires to master English, reading, mathematics, or any other subject required for high school graduation. A student attending an adult general education program shall have the opportunity to take any must-pass assessment under s. 1003.4282 or s. 1008.22 an unlimited number of times in order to receive a standard high school diploma.
(3) Students who have been enrolled in an ESOL program for less than 2 school years and have met all requirements for the standard high school diploma except for passage of any must-pass assessment under s. 1003.4282 or s. 1008.22 or alternate assessment may receive immersion English language instruction during the summer following their senior year. Students receiving such instruction are eligible to take the required assessment or alternate assessment and receive a standard high school diploma upon passage of the required assessment or alternate assessment. This subsection shall be implemented to the extent funding is provided in the General Appropriations Act.
History.s. 1, ch. 2003-413; s. 11, ch. 2008-235; s. 34, ch. 2011-5; s. 23, ch. 2013-27; s. 10, ch. 2013-35; s. 7, ch. 2013-51.
1003.435 High school equivalency diploma program.
(1) The State Board of Education shall adopt rules that prescribe performance standards and provide for comprehensive examinations to be administered to candidates for high school equivalency diplomas. Such rules shall include, but are not limited to, provisions for fees, frequency of examinations, and procedures for retaking an examination upon unsatisfactory performance.
(2) The department may award high school equivalency diplomas to candidates who meet the performance standards prescribed by the State Board of Education.
(3) Each district school board shall offer and administer the high school equivalency diploma examinations and the subject area examinations to all candidates pursuant to rules of the State Board of Education.
(4) A candidate for a high school equivalency diploma shall be at least 18 years of age on the date of the examination, except that in extraordinary circumstances, as provided for in rules of the district school board of the district in which the candidate resides or attends school, a candidate may take the examination after reaching the age of 16.
(5) Each district school board shall develop, in cooperation with the area Florida College System institution board of trustees, a plan for the provision of advanced instruction for those students who attain satisfactory performance on the high school equivalency examination or the subject area examinations or who demonstrate through other means a readiness to engage in postsecondary-level academic work. The plan shall include provisions for the equitable distribution of generated funds to cover personnel, maintenance, and other costs of offering the advanced instruction. Priority shall be given to programs of advanced instruction offered in high school facilities.
(6) All high school equivalency diplomas issued under the provisions of this section shall have equal status with other high school diplomas for all state purposes, including admission to any state university or Florida College System institution.
History.s. 133, ch. 2002-387; s. 35, ch. 2011-5; s. 24, ch. 2013-27.
1003.436 Definition of “credit.”
(1)(a) For the purposes of requirements for high school graduation, one full credit means a minimum of 135 hours of bona fide instruction in a designated course of study that contains student performance standards, except as otherwise provided through the Credit Acceleration Program (CAP) under s. 1003.4295(3). One full credit means a minimum of 120 hours of bona fide instruction in a designated course of study that contains student performance standards for purposes of meeting high school graduation requirements in a district school that has been authorized to implement block scheduling by the district school board. The State Board of Education shall determine the number of postsecondary credit hours earned through dual enrollment pursuant to s. 1007.271 that satisfy the requirements of a dual enrollment articulation agreement according to s. 1007.271(21) and that equal one full credit of the equivalent high school course identified pursuant to s. 1007.271(9).
(b) The hourly requirements for one-half credit are one-half the requirements specified in paragraph (a).
(2) In awarding credit for high school graduation, each district school board shall maintain a one-half credit earned system that shall include courses provided on a full-year basis. A student enrolled in a full-year course shall receive one-half credit if the student successfully completes either the first half or the second half of a full-year course but fails to successfully complete the other half of the course and the averaging of the grades obtained in each half would not result in a passing grade. A student enrolled in a full-year course shall receive a full credit if the student successfully completes either the first half or the second half of a full-year course but fails to successfully complete the other half of the course and the averaging of the grades obtained in each half would result in a passing grade, provided that such additional requirements specified in district school board policies, such as class attendance, homework, participation, and other indicators of performance, shall be successfully completed by the student.
History.s. 134, ch. 2002-387; s. 14, ch. 2003-391; s. 11, ch. 2012-191; s. 25, ch. 2013-27.
1003.437 Middle and high school grading system.The grading system and interpretation of letter grades used to measure student success in grade 6 through grade 12 courses for students in public schools shall be as follows:
(1) Grade “A” equals 90 percent through 100 percent, has a grade point average value of 4, and is defined as “outstanding progress.”
(2) Grade “B” equals 80 percent through 89 percent, has a grade point average value of 3, and is defined as “above average progress.”
(3) Grade “C” equals 70 percent through 79 percent, has a grade point average value of 2, and is defined as “average progress.”
(4) Grade “D” equals 60 percent through 69 percent, has a grade point average value of 1, and is defined as “lowest acceptable progress.”
(5) Grade “F” equals zero percent through 59 percent, has a grade point average value of zero, and is defined as “failure.”
(6) Grade “I” equals zero percent, has a grade point average value of zero, and is defined as “incomplete.”

For the purposes of class ranking, district school boards may exercise a weighted grading system pursuant to s. 1007.271.

History.s. 135, ch. 2002-387; s. 25, ch. 2006-74; s. 12, ch. 2012-191.
11003.438 Special high school graduation requirements for certain exceptional students.A student who has been identified, in accordance with rules established by the State Board of Education, as a student with disabilities who has an intellectual disability; an autism spectrum disorder; a language impairment; an orthopedic impairment; an other health impairment; a traumatic brain injury; an emotional or behavioral disability; a specific learning disability, including, but not limited to, dyslexia, dyscalculia, or developmental aphasia; or students who are deaf or hard of hearing or dual sensory impaired shall not be required to meet all requirements of s. 1002.3105(5), s. 1003.4281, or s. 1003.4282 and shall, upon meeting all applicable requirements prescribed by the district school board pursuant to s. 1008.25, be awarded a special diploma in a form prescribed by the commissioner; however, such special graduation requirements prescribed by the district school board must include minimum graduation requirements as prescribed by the commissioner. Any such student who meets all special requirements of the district school board, but is unable to meet the appropriate special state minimum requirements, shall be awarded a special certificate of completion in a form prescribed by the commissioner. However, this section does not limit or restrict the right of an exceptional student solely to a special diploma or special certificate of completion. Any such student shall, upon proper request, be afforded the opportunity to fully meet all requirements of s. 1002.3105(5), s. 1003.4281, or s. 1003.4282 through the standard procedures established therein and thereby to qualify for a standard diploma upon graduation.
History.s. 136, ch. 2002-387; s. 5, ch. 2008-204; s. 26, ch. 2013-27; s. 47, ch. 2013-35; s. 42, ch. 2014-39; s. 19, ch. 2014-184.
1Note.

A. Repealed July 1, 2015, by s. 19, ch. 2014-184.

B. Section 27, ch. 2014-184, provides that “[t]he amendments made by this act to ss. 1003.438 and 409.1451, Florida Statutes, do not apply to a student with disabilities, as defined in s. 1003.438, Florida Statutes, who is eligible for and currently participating in the Road to Independence Program, as of the effective date of this act. Such student shall continue to participate in the program as long as he or she meets the eligibility criteria in effect as of the effective date of this act.”

C. Section 28, ch. 2014-184, provides that “[t]he amendment made by this act to s. 1003.438, Florida Statutes, does not apply to a student with disabilities, as defined in s. 1003.438, Florida Statutes, whose individual education plan, as of the effective date of this act, contains a statement of intent to receive a special diploma. Such student shall be awarded a special diploma in a form prescribed by the Commissioner of Education if the student meets the requirements specified in s. 1003.438, Florida Statutes, and in effect as of the effective date of this act. Any such student who meets all special requirements of the district school board in effect as of the effective date of this act, but who is unable to meet the appropriate special state minimum requirements in effect as of the effective date of this act, shall be awarded a special certificate of completion in a form prescribed by the Commissioner of Education.”

1003.44 Patriotic programs; rules.
(1) Each district school board may adopt rules to require, in all of the schools of the district, programs of a patriotic nature to encourage greater respect for the government of the United States and its national anthem and flag, subject always to other existing pertinent laws of the United States or of the state. When the national anthem is played, students and all civilians shall stand at attention, men removing the headdress, except when such headdress is worn for religious purposes. The pledge of allegiance to the flag, “I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all,” shall be rendered by students standing with the right hand over the heart. The pledge of allegiance to the flag shall be recited at the beginning of the day in each public elementary, middle, and high school in the state. Each student shall be informed by posting a notice in a conspicuous place that the student has the right not to participate in reciting the pledge. Upon written request by his or her parent, the student must be excused from reciting the pledge. When the pledge is given, civilians must show full respect to the flag by standing at attention, men removing the headdress, except when such headdress is worn for religious purposes, as provided by Pub. L. ch. 77-435, s. 7, approved June 22, 1942, 56 Stat. 377, as amended by Pub. L. ch. 77-806, 56 Stat. 1074, approved December 22, 1942.
(2) Each district school board may allow any teacher or administrator to read, or to post in a public school building or classroom or at any school-related event, any excerpt or portion of the following historic material: the national motto; the national anthem; the pledge of allegiance; the Constitution of the State of Florida, including the Preamble; the Constitution of the United States, including the Preamble; the Bill of Rights; the Declaration of Independence; the Mayflower Compact; the Emancipation Proclamation; the writings, speeches, documents, and proclamations of the presidents of the United States, the signers of the Constitution of the United States and the Declaration of Independence, and civil rights leaders; and decisions of the United States Supreme Court. However, any material that is read, posted, or taught pursuant to this provision may be presented only from a historical perspective and in a nonproselytizing manner. When less than an entire document is used, the excerpt or portion must include as much material as is reasonably necessary to reflect the sentiment of the entire document and avoid expressing statements out of the context in which they were originally made. If the material refers to laws or judicial decisions that have been superseded, the material must be accompanied by a statement indicating that such law or decision is no longer the law of the land. No material shall be selected to advance a particular religious, political, or sectarian purpose. The department shall distribute a copy of this section to each district school board, whereupon each district school superintendent shall distribute a copy to all teachers and administrators.
History.s. 137, ch. 2002-387.
1003.45 Permitting study of the Bible and religion; permitting brief meditation period.
(1) The district school board may install in the public schools in the district a secular program of education including, but not limited to, an objective study of the Bible and of religion.
(2) The district school board may provide that a brief period, not to exceed 2 minutes, for the purpose of silent prayer or meditation be set aside at the start of each school day or each school week in the public schools in the district.
History.s. 138, ch. 2002-387.
1003.4505 Protection of school speech.District school boards, administrative personnel, and instructional personnel are prohibited from taking affirmative action, including, but not limited to, the entry into any agreement, that infringes or waives the rights or freedoms afforded to instructional personnel, school staff, or students by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, in the absence of the express written consent of any individual whose constitutional rights would be impacted by such infringement or waiver.
History.s. 1, ch. 2010-214.
1003.451 Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps; military recruiters; access to public school campuses.
(1) A school district may not ban any branch of the United States Armed Forces or the United States Department of Homeland Security from establishing, maintaining, or operating a unit of the Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps at a public high school in the district.
(2)(a) A school district shall allow a student attending a public high school in the district to enroll in the Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps at another public high school in the district unless:
1. The student’s school offers the Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps for any branch of the United States Armed Forces or United States Department of Homeland Security;
2. The student does not meet the Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps’ minimum enrollment qualifications; or
3. Scheduling of the student’s courses of study does not allow the student to attend the Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps at another public high school in the district.
(b) This subsection does not require a school district to provide transportation for a student to attend the Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps at another public high school in the district.
(3)(a) A school district shall grant military recruiters of the United States Armed Forces and United States Department of Homeland Security the same access to secondary school students, and to school facilities and grounds, which the district grants to postsecondary educational institutions or prospective employers of students.
(b) A school district shall, as required in 20 U.S.C. s. 7908(a)(1), grant military recruiters access to the names, addresses, and telephone listings of secondary school students, except, the district shall comply with a student’s or parent’s request under 20 U.S.C. s. 7908(a)(2) or s. 1002.22 not to release the student’s information without prior written parental consent.
(4) The State Board of Education shall enforce this section under s. 1008.32.
History.s. 1, ch. 2008-73; s. 6, ch. 2009-239; s. 5, ch. 2014-21; s. 43, ch. 2014-39.
1003.453 School wellness and physical education policies; nutrition guidelines.
(1) Each school district shall electronically submit its local school wellness policy to the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and its physical education policy required under s. 1003.455 to the Department of Education. Each school district shall annually review its local school wellness policy and physical education policy and provide a procedure for public input and revisions. In addition, each school district shall provide its revised local school wellness policy and revised physical education policy to the applicable department when a change or revision is made.
(2) The department must provide on its website links to resources that include information regarding:
(a) Classroom instruction on the benefits of exercise and healthful eating.
(b) Classroom instruction on the health hazards of using tobacco and being exposed to tobacco smoke.
(c) The eight components of a coordinated school health program, including health education, physical education, health services, and nutrition services.
(d) The core measures for school health and wellness, such as the School Health Index.
(e) Access for each student to the nutritional content of foods and beverages and to healthful food choices in accordance with the dietary guidelines of the United States Department of Agriculture. This information shall also be accessible from the website of the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
(f) Multiple examples of school wellness policies for school districts.
(g) Examples of wellness classes that provide nutrition education for teachers and school support staff, including encouragement to provide classes that are taught by a licensed nutrition professional from the school nutrition department.
(3) School districts are encouraged to provide basic training in first aid, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, for all students, beginning in grade 6 and every 2 years thereafter. Private and public partnerships for providing training or necessary funding are encouraged.
History.s. 18, ch. 2006-301; s. 8, ch. 2011-217; s. 11, ch. 2013-35; s. 40, ch. 2013-226.
1003.455 Physical education; assessment.
(1) It is the responsibility of each district school board to develop a physical education program that stresses physical fitness and encourages healthful, active lifestyles and to encourage all students in prekindergarten through grade 12 to participate in physical education. Physical education shall consist of physical activities of at least a moderate intensity level and for a duration sufficient to provide a significant health benefit to students, subject to the differing capabilities of students. All physical education programs and curricula must be reviewed by a certified physical education instructor.
(2) Each district school board shall adopt a written physical education policy that details the school district’s physical education program, the expected program outcomes, the benefits of physical education, and the availability of one-on-one counseling concerning the benefits of physical education.
(3) Each district school board shall provide 150 minutes of physical education each week for students in kindergarten through grade 5 and for students in grade 6 who are enrolled in a school that contains one or more elementary grades so that on any day during which physical education instruction is conducted there are at least 30 consecutive minutes per day. Beginning with the 2009-2010 school year, the equivalent of one class period per day of physical education for one semester of each year is required for students enrolled in grades 6 through 8. Students enrolled in such instruction shall be reported through the periodic student membership surveys, and records of such enrollment shall be audited pursuant to s. 1010.305. Such instruction may be provided by any instructional personnel as defined in s. 1012.01(2), regardless of certification, who are designated by the school principal.
(4) The requirement in subsection (3) shall be waived for a student who meets one of the following criteria:
(a) The student is enrolled or required to enroll in a remedial course.
(b) The student’s parent indicates in writing to the school that:
1. The parent requests that the student enroll in another course from among those courses offered as options by the school district; or
2. The student is participating in physical activities outside the school day which are equal to or in excess of the mandated requirement.
(5) Each school district shall notify the student’s parent of the options available under subsection (4) before scheduling the student to participate in physical education.
History.s. 4, ch. 2004-255; s. 19, ch. 2006-301; s. 3, ch. 2007-28; s. 2, ch. 2008-94.
1003.46 Health education; instruction in acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
(1) Each district school board may provide instruction in acquired immune deficiency syndrome education as a specific area of health education. Such instruction may include, but is not limited to, the known modes of transmission, signs and symptoms, risk factors associated with acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and means used to control the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The instruction shall be appropriate for the grade and age of the student and shall reflect current theory, knowledge, and practice regarding acquired immune deficiency syndrome and its prevention.
(2) Throughout instruction in acquired immune deficiency syndrome, sexually transmitted diseases, or health education, when such instruction and course material contains instruction in human sexuality, a school shall:
(a) Teach abstinence from sexual activity outside of marriage as the expected standard for all school-age students while teaching the benefits of monogamous heterosexual marriage.
(b) Emphasize that abstinence from sexual activity is a certain way to avoid out-of-wedlock pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, including acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and other associated health problems.
(c) Teach that each student has the power to control personal behavior and encourage students to base actions on reasoning, self-esteem, and respect for others.
(d) Provide instruction and material that is appropriate for the grade and age of the student.
History.s. 139, ch. 2002-387.
1003.47 Biological experiments on living subjects.
(1) It is the intent of the Legislature with respect to biological experiments involving living subjects by students in grades K through 12 that:
(a) No surgery or dissection shall be performed on any living mammalian vertebrate or bird. Dissection may be performed on nonliving mammals or birds secured from a recognized source of such specimens and under supervision of qualified instructors. Students may be excused upon written request of a parent.
(b) Lower orders of life and invertebrates may be used in such experiments.
(c) Nonmammalian vertebrates, excluding birds, may be used in biological experiments, provided that physiological harm does not result from such experiments. Anatomical studies shall only be conducted on models that are anatomically correct for the animal being studied or on nonliving nonmammalian vertebrates secured and from a recognized source of such specimens and under the supervision of qualified instructors. Students may be excused from such experiments upon written request of the parent.
(d) Observational studies of animals in the wild or in zoological parks, gardens, or aquaria, or of pets, fish, domestic animals, or livestock may be conducted.
(e) Studies of vertebrate animal cells, such as red blood cells or other tissue cells, plasma or serum, or anatomical specimens, such as organs, tissues, or skeletons, purchased or acquired from biological supply houses or research facilities or from wholesale or retail establishments that supply carcasses or parts of food animals may be conducted.
(f) Normal physiological and behavioral studies of the human animal may be conducted, provided that such projects are carefully selected so that neither physiological nor psychological harm to the subject can result from such studies.
(g) All experiments shall be carried out under the supervision of a competent science teacher who shall be responsible for ensuring that the student has the necessary comprehension for the study to be undertaken. Whenever feasible, specifically qualified experts in the field should be consulted.
(h) Live animals on the premises of public and private elementary, middle, and high schools shall be housed and cared for in a humane and safe manner. Animals shall not remain on the premises of any school during periods when such school is not in session, unless adequate care is provided for such animals.
(2) The provisions of this section shall not be construed to prohibit or constrain conventional instruction in the normal practices of animal husbandry or exhibition of any livestock in connection with any agricultural program or instruction of advanced students participating in advanced research, scientific studies, or projects.
(3) If any instructional employee of a public high school or career center knowingly or intentionally fails or refuses to comply with any of the provisions of this section, the district school board may suspend, dismiss, return to annual contract, or otherwise discipline such employee as provided in s. 1012.22(1)(f) in accordance with procedures established in chapter 1012. If any instructional employee of any private school knowingly or intentionally fails or refuses to comply with the provisions of this section, the governing authority of the private school may suspend, dismiss, or otherwise discipline such employee in accordance with its standard personnel procedures.
History.s. 140, ch. 2002-387; s. 84, ch. 2004-357.
1003.48 Instruction in operation of motor vehicles.
(1) A course of study and instruction in the safe and lawful operation of a motor vehicle shall be made available by each district school board to students in the secondary schools in the state. The secondary school shall provide preferential enrollment to a student who is in the custody of the Department of Children and Families if the student maintains appropriate progress as required by the school. As used in this section, the term “motor vehicle” has the same meaning as in s. 320.01(1)(a) and includes motorcycles and mopeds. Instruction in motorcycle or moped operation may be limited to classroom instruction. The course may not be made a part of, or a substitute for, any of the minimum requirements for graduation.
(2) In order to make such a course available to any secondary school student, the district school board may use any one of the following procedures or any combination thereof:
(a) Use instructional personnel employed by the district school board.
(b) Contract with a commercial driving school licensed under chapter 488.
(c) Contract with an instructor certified under chapter 488.
(3) District school boards shall earn funds on full-time equivalent students at the appropriate basic program cost factor, regardless of the method by which such courses are offered.
(4) For the purpose of financing the Driver Education Program in the secondary schools, there shall be levied an additional 50 cents per year to the driver license fee required by s. 322.21. The additional fee shall be promptly remitted to the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, which shall transmit the fee to the Chief Financial Officer to be deposited in the General Revenue Fund.
(5) The district school board shall prescribe standards for the course required by this section and for instructional personnel directly employed by the district school board. A certified instructor or licensed commercial driving school is sufficiently qualified and is not required to meet any standards in lieu of or in addition to those prescribed under chapter 488.
History.s. 141, ch. 2002-387; s. 1947, ch. 2003-261; s. 4, ch. 2014-166.
1003.49 Graduation and promotion requirements for publicly operated schools.
(1) Each state or local public agency, including the Department of Children and Families, the Department of Corrections, the boards of trustees of universities and Florida College System institutions, and the Board of Trustees of the Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind, which agency is authorized to operate educational programs for students at any level of grades kindergarten through 12, shall be subject to all applicable requirements of ss. 1002.3105(5), 1003.4281, 1003.4282, 1008.23, and 1008.25. Within the content of these cited statutes each such state or local public agency or entity shall be considered a “district school board.”
(2) The Commissioner of Education shall establish procedures to extend the state-administered assessment program to school programs operated by such state or local public agencies or entities in the same manner and to the same extent as such program is administered in each district school system.
History.s. 142, ch. 2002-387; s. 36, ch. 2011-5; s. 48, ch. 2013-35; s. 180, ch. 2014-17; s. 367, ch. 2014-19; s. 44, ch. 2014-39.
1003.491 Florida Career and Professional Education Act.The Florida Career and Professional Education Act is created to provide a statewide planning partnership between the business and education communities in order to attract, expand, and retain targeted, high-value industry and to sustain a strong, knowledge-based economy.
(1) The primary purpose of the Florida Career and Professional Education Act is to:
(a) Improve middle and high school academic performance by providing rigorous and relevant curriculum opportunities;
(b) Provide rigorous and relevant career-themed courses that articulate to postsecondary-level coursework and lead to industry certification;
(c) Support local and regional economic development;
(d) Respond to Florida’s critical workforce needs; and
(e) Provide state residents with access to high-wage and high-demand careers.
(2) Each district school board shall develop, in collaboration with regional workforce boards, economic development agencies, and postsecondary institutions approved to operate in the state, a strategic 3-year plan to address and meet local and regional workforce demands. If involvement of a regional workforce board or an economic development agency in the strategic plan development is not feasible, the local school board, with the approval of the Department of Economic Opportunity, shall collaborate with the most appropriate regional business leadership board. Two or more school districts may collaborate in the development of the strategic plan and offer career-themed courses, as defined in s. 1003.493(1)(b), or a career and professional academy as a joint venture. The strategic plan must describe in detail provisions for the efficient transportation of students, the maximum use of shared resources, access to courses aligned to state curriculum standards through virtual education providers legislatively authorized to provide part-time instruction to middle school students, and an objective review of proposed career and professional academy courses and other career-themed courses to determine if the courses will lead to the attainment of industry certifications included on the Industry Certified Funding List pursuant to rules adopted by the State Board of Education. Each strategic plan shall be reviewed, updated, and jointly approved every 3 years by the local school district, regional workforce boards, economic development agencies, and state-approved postsecondary institutions.
(3) The strategic 3-year plan developed jointly by the local school district, regional workforce boards, economic development agencies, and state-approved postsecondary institutions shall be constructed and based on:
(a) Research conducted to objectively determine local and regional workforce needs for the ensuing 3 years, using labor projections of the United States Department of Labor and the Department of Economic Opportunity;
(b) Strategies to develop and implement career academies or career-themed courses based on those careers determined to be high-wage, high-skill, and high-demand;
(c) Strategies to provide shared, maximum use of private sector facilities and personnel;
(d) Strategies that ensure instruction by industry-certified faculty and standards and strategies to maintain current industry credentials and for recruiting and retaining faculty to meet those standards;
(e) Strategies to provide personalized student advisement, including a parent-participation component, and coordination with middle grades to promote and support career-themed courses and education planning as required under s. 1003.4156;
(f) Alignment of requirements for middle school career planning under s. 1003.4156(1)(e), middle and high school career and professional academies or career-themed courses leading to industry certification or postsecondary credit, and high school graduation requirements;
(g) Provisions to ensure that career-themed courses and courses offered through career and professional academies are academically rigorous, meet or exceed appropriate state-adopted subject area standards, result in attainment of industry certification, and, when appropriate, result in postsecondary credit;
(h) Plans to sustain and improve career-themed courses and career and professional academies;
(i) Strategies to improve the passage rate for industry certification examinations if the rate falls below 50 percent;
(j) Strategies to recruit students into career-themed courses and career and professional academies which include opportunities for students who have been unsuccessful in traditional classrooms but who are interested in enrolling in career-themed courses or a career and professional academy. School boards shall provide opportunities for students who may be deemed as potential dropouts to enroll in career-themed courses or participate in career and professional academies;
(k) Strategies to provide sufficient space within academies to meet workforce needs and to provide access to all interested and qualified students;
(l) Strategies to implement career-themed courses or career and professional academy training that lead to industry certification in juvenile justice education programs;
(m) Opportunities for high school students to earn weighted or dual enrollment credit for higher-level career and technical courses;
(n) Promotion of the benefits of the Gold Seal Bright Futures Scholarship;
(o) Strategies to ensure the review of district pupil-progression plans and to amend such plans to include career-themed courses and career and professional academy courses and to include courses that may qualify as substitute courses for core graduation requirements and those that may be counted as elective courses;
(p) Strategies to provide professional development for secondary certified school counselors on the benefits of career and professional academies and career-themed courses that lead to industry certification; and
(q) Strategies to redirect appropriated career funding in secondary and postsecondary institutions to support career academies and career-themed courses that lead to industry certification.
(4) The State Board of Education shall establish a process for the continual and uninterrupted review of newly proposed core secondary courses and existing courses requested to be considered as core courses to ensure that sufficient rigor and relevance is provided for workforce skills and postsecondary education and aligned to state curriculum standards.
(a) The review of newly proposed core secondary courses shall be the responsibility of a curriculum review committee whose membership is approved by Workforce Florida, Inc., and shall include:
1. Three certified high school counselors recommended by the Florida Association of Student Services Administrators.
2. Three assistant superintendents for curriculum and instruction, recommended by the Florida Association of District School Superintendents and who serve in districts that operate successful career and professional academies pursuant to s. 1003.492 or a successful series of courses that lead to industry certification. Committee members in this category shall employ the expertise of appropriate subject area specialists in the review of proposed courses.
3. Three workforce representatives recommended by the Department of Economic Opportunity.
4. Three admissions directors of postsecondary institutions accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, representing both public and private institutions.
5. The Commissioner of Education, or his or her designee, responsible for K-12 curriculum and instruction. The commissioner shall employ the expertise of appropriate subject area specialists in the review of proposed courses.
(b) The curriculum review committee shall review newly proposed core courses electronically. Each proposed core course shall be approved or denied within 30 days after submission by a district school board or regional workforce board. All courses approved as core courses for purposes of middle school promotion and high school graduation shall be immediately added to the Course Code Directory. Approved core courses shall also be reviewed and considered for approval for dual enrollment credit. The Board of Governors and the Commissioner of Education shall jointly recommend an annual deadline for approval of new core courses to be included for purposes of postsecondary admissions and dual enrollment credit the following academic year. The State Board of Education shall establish an appeals process in the event that a proposed course is denied which shall require a consensus ruling by the Department of Economic Opportunity and the Commissioner of Education within 15 days.
History.s. 143, ch. 2002-387; s. 3, ch. 2004-357; s. 26, ch. 2006-74; s. 1, ch. 2007-216; s. 460, ch. 2011-142; s. 20, ch. 2011-175; s. 13, ch. 2012-191; s. 27, ch. 2013-27; s. 6, ch. 2013-89.
1003.492 Industry-certified career education programs.
(1) Secondary schools offering career-themed courses, as defined in s. 1003.493(1)(b), and career and professional academies shall be coordinated with the relevant and appropriate industry to prepare a student for further education or for employment in that industry.
(2) Industry certification as used in this section is a voluntary process through which students are assessed by an independent, third-party certifying entity using predetermined standards for knowledge, skills, and competencies, resulting in the award of a credential that is nationally recognized and must be at least one of the following:
(a) Within an industry that addresses a critical local or statewide economic need;
(b) Linked to an occupation that is included in the workforce system’s targeted occupation list; or
(c) Linked to an occupation that is identified as emerging.
(3) The State Board of Education shall use the expertise of Workforce Florida, Inc., and the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services to develop and adopt rules pursuant to ss. 120.536(1) and 120.54 for implementing an industry certification process.
(a) For nonfarm occupations, industry certification shall be based upon the highest available national standards for specific industry certification to ensure student skill proficiency and to address emerging labor market and industry trends. A regional workforce board or a school principal may apply to Workforce Florida, Inc., to request additions to the approved list of industry certifications based on high-skill, high-wage, and high-demand job requirements in the regional economy.
(b) For farm occupations submitted pursuant to s. 570.07, industry certification shall demonstrate student skill proficiency and be based upon the best available data to address critical local or statewide economic needs.
(4) The list of industry certifications approved by Workforce Florida, Inc., the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Department of Education shall be published and updated annually by a date certain, to be included in the adopted rule.
(5) The Department of Education shall collect student achievement and performance data in industry-certified career education programs and career-themed courses and shall work with Workforce Florida, Inc., and the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services in the analysis of collected data. The data collection and analyses shall examine the performance of participating students over time. Performance factors shall include, but not be limited to, graduation rates, retention rates, Florida Bright Futures Scholarship awards, additional educational attainment, employment records, earnings, industry certification, return on investment, and employer satisfaction. The results of this study shall be submitted to the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives annually by December 31.
History.s. 4, ch. 2004-357; s. 2, ch. 2007-216; s. 14, ch. 2010-154; s. 461, ch. 2011-142; s. 14, ch. 2012-191; s. 2, ch. 2014-33; s. 6, ch. 2014-184.
1003.493 Career and professional academies and career-themed courses.
(1)(a) A “career and professional academy” is a research-based program that integrates a rigorous academic curriculum with an industry-specific curriculum aligned directly to priority workforce needs established by the regional workforce board or the Department of Economic Opportunity. Career and professional academies shall be offered by public schools and school districts. The Florida Virtual School is encouraged to develop and offer rigorous career and professional courses as appropriate. Students completing career and professional academy programs must receive a standard high school diploma, the highest available industry certification, and opportunities to earn postsecondary credit if the academy partners with a postsecondary institution approved to operate in the state.
(b) A “career-themed course” is a course, or a course in a series of courses, that leads to an industry certification identified in the Industry Certification Funding List pursuant to rules adopted by the State Board of Education. Career-themed courses have industry-specific curriculum aligned directly to priority workforce needs established by the regional workforce board or the Department of Economic Opportunity. School districts shall offer at least two career-themed courses, and each secondary school is encouraged to offer at least one career-themed course. The Florida Virtual School is encouraged to develop and offer rigorous career-themed courses as appropriate. Students completing a career-themed course must be provided opportunities to earn postsecondary credit if the credit for the career-themed course can be articulated to a postsecondary institution approved to operate in the state.
(2) The goals of a career and professional academy and career-themed courses are to:
(a) Increase student academic achievement and graduation rates through integrated academic and career curricula.
(b) Prepare graduating high school students to make appropriate choices relative to employment and future educational experiences.
(c) Focus on career preparation through rigorous academics and industry certification.
(d) Raise student aspiration and commitment to academic achievement and work ethics through relevant coursework.
(e) Promote acceleration mechanisms, such as dual enrollment or articulated credit, so that students may earn postsecondary credit while in high school.
(f) Support the state’s economy by meeting industry needs for skilled employees in high-skill, high-wage, and high-demand occupations.
(3)(a) Career-themed courses may be offered in any public secondary school.
(b) Existing career education courses may serve as a foundation for the creation of a career and professional academy. A career and professional academy may be offered as one of the following small learning communities:
1. A school-within-a-school career academy, as part of an existing high school, that provides courses in one or more occupational clusters. Students who attend the school are not required to attend the academy.
2. A total school configuration that provides courses in one or more occupational clusters. Every student who attends the school also attends the academy.
(4) Each career and professional academy and secondary school providing a career-themed course must:
(a) Provide a rigorous standards-based academic curriculum integrated with a career curriculum; consider multiple styles of student learning; promote learning by doing through application and adaptation; maximize relevance of the subject matter; enhance each student’s capacity to excel; and include an emphasis on work habits and work ethics.
(b) Include one or more partnerships with postsecondary institutions, businesses, industry, employers, economic development organizations, or other appropriate partners from the local community. Such partnerships with postsecondary institutions shall be delineated in articulation agreements and include any career and professional academy courses or career-themed courses that earn postsecondary credit. Such agreements may include articulation between the secondary school and public or private 2-year and 4-year postsecondary institutions and technical centers. The Department of Education, in consultation with the Board of Governors, shall establish a mechanism to ensure articulation and transfer of credits to postsecondary institutions in this state. Such partnerships must provide opportunities for:
1. Instruction from highly skilled professionals who possess industry-certification credentials for courses they are teaching.
2. Internships, externships, and on-the-job training.
3. A postsecondary degree, diploma, or certificate.
4. The highest available level of industry certification.
5. Maximum articulation of credits pursuant to s. 1007.23 upon program completion.
(c) Promote and provide opportunities for students enrolled in a career and professional academy or a career-themed course to attain, at minimum, the Florida Gold Seal Vocational Scholars award pursuant to s. 1009.536.
(d) Provide instruction in careers designated as high-skill, high-wage, and high-demand by the regional workforce development board, the chamber of commerce, economic development agencies, or the Department of Economic Opportunity.
(e) Deliver academic content through instruction relevant to the career, including intensive reading and mathematics intervention required by s. 1003.4282, with an emphasis on strengthening reading for information skills.
(f) Offer applied courses that combine academic content with technical skills.
(g) Provide instruction resulting in competency, certification, or credentials in workplace skills, including, but not limited to, communication skills, interpersonal skills, decisionmaking skills, the importance of attendance and timeliness in the work environment, and work ethics.
(5) All career courses offered in a career and professional academy and each career-themed course offered by a secondary school must lead to industry certification or college credit. If the passage rate on an industry certification examination that is associated with the career and professional academy or a career-themed course falls below 50 percent, the 3-year strategic plan must be amended to include specific strategies to improve the passage rate of the academy or career-themed course.
(6) Workforce Florida, Inc., shall serve in an advisory role and offer technical assistance in the development and deployment of newly established career and professional academies and career-themed courses.
History.s. 27, ch. 2006-74; s. 9, ch. 2006-301; s. 3, ch. 2007-216; s. 6, ch. 2010-22; s. 462, ch. 2011-142; s. 21, ch. 2011-175; s. 15, ch. 2012-191; s. 45, ch. 2014-39.
1003.4935 Middle grades career and professional academy courses and career-themed courses.
(1) Beginning with the 2011-2012 school year, each district school board, in collaboration with regional workforce boards, economic development agencies, and state-approved postsecondary institutions, shall include plans to implement a career and professional academy or a career-themed course, as defined in s. 1003.493(1)(b), in at least one middle school in the district as part of the strategic 3-year plan pursuant to s. 1003.491(2). The strategic plan must provide students the opportunity to transfer from a middle school career and professional academy or a career-themed course to a high school career and professional academy or a career-themed course currently operating within the school district. Students who complete a middle school career and professional academy or a career-themed course must have the opportunity to earn an industry certificate and high school credit and participate in career planning, job shadowing, and business leadership development activities.
(2) Each middle grades career and professional academy or career-themed course must be aligned with at least one high school career and professional academy or career-themed course offered in the district and maintain partnerships with local business and industry and economic development boards. Middle grades career and professional academies and career-themed courses must:
(a) Lead to careers in occupations designated as high-skill, high-wage, and high-demand in the Industry Certification Funding List approved under rules adopted by the State Board of Education;
(b) Integrate content from core subject areas;
(c) Integrate career and professional academy or career-themed course content with intensive reading, English Language Arts, and mathematics pursuant to s. 1003.4282;
(d) Coordinate with high schools to maximize opportunities for middle grades students to earn high school credit;
(e) Provide access to virtual instruction courses provided by virtual education providers legislatively authorized to provide part-time instruction to middle grades students. The virtual instruction courses must be aligned to state curriculum standards for middle grades career and professional academy courses or career-themed courses, with priority given to students who have required course deficits;
(f) Provide instruction from highly skilled professionals who hold industry certificates in the career area in which they teach;
(g) Offer externships; and
(h) Provide personalized student advisement that includes a parent-participation component.
(3) Beginning with the 2012-2013 school year, if a school district implements a middle school career and professional academy or a career-themed course, the Department of Education shall collect and report student achievement data pursuant to performance factors identified under s. 1003.492(5) for students enrolled in an academy or a career-themed course.
(4) CAPE Digital Tool certificates and CAPE industry certifications offered in the middle grades that are included on the CAPE Industry Certification Funding List, if earned by students, are eligible for additional full-time equivalent membership pursuant to s. 1011.62(1)(o)1.a. and b.
History.s. 16, ch. 2011-55; s. 22, ch. 2011-175; s. 16, ch. 2012-191; s. 28, ch. 2013-27; s. 3, ch. 2014-33; s. 46, ch. 2014-39; s. 7, ch. 2014-184.
1003.497 Service learning.
(1) The Department of Education shall encourage school districts to initiate, adopt, expand, and institutionalize service-learning programs, activities, and policies in kindergarten through grade 12. Service learning refers to a student-centered, research-based teaching and learning strategy that engages students in meaningful service activities in their schools or communities. Service-learning activities are directly tied to academic curricula, standards, and course, district, or state assessments. Service-learning activities foster academic achievement, character development, civic engagement, and career exploration and enable students to apply curriculum content, skills, and behaviors taught in the classroom.
(2) Upon request of any school district that chooses to implement service-learning programs, activities, or policies, the department shall provide assistance in locating, leveraging, and utilizing available or alternative financial resources that will assist school districts or teachers desiring to receive training and other resources to develop and administer service-learning programs or activities. School districts are encouraged to include kindergarten through grade 12 service-learning programs and activities in proposals they submit to the department under federal entitlement grants and competitive state and federal grants administered through the department.
(3)(a) The department shall develop and adopt elective service-learning courses for inclusion in middle and high school course code directories, which will allow additional opportunities for students to engage in service learning. School districts are encouraged to provide support for the use of service learning at any grade level as an instructional strategy to address appropriate areas of state education standards for student knowledge and performance.
(b) The hours that high school students devote to course-based service-learning activities may be counted toward meeting community service requirements for high school graduation and community service requirements for participation in the Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Program. School districts are encouraged to include service learning as part of any course or activity required for high school graduation and to include and accept service-learning activities and hours in requirements for academic awards, especially those awards that currently include community service as a criterion or selection factor.
History.s. 2, ch. 2009-222.
1003.498 School district virtual course offerings.
(1) School districts may deliver courses in the traditional school setting by personnel certified pursuant to s. 1012.55 who provide direct instruction through virtual instruction or through blended learning courses consisting of both traditional classroom and online instructional techniques. Students in a blended learning course must be full-time students of the school and receive the online instruction in a classroom setting at the school. The funding, performance, and accountability requirements for blended learning courses are the same as those for traditional courses. To facilitate the delivery and coding of blended learning courses, the department shall provide identifiers for 1existing courses to designate that they are being used for blended learning courses for the purpose of ensuring the efficient reporting of such courses. A district may report full-time equivalent student membership for credit earned by a student who is enrolled in a virtual education course provided by the district which is completed after the end of the regular school year if the FTE is reported no later than the deadline for amending the final student membership report for that year.
(2) School districts may offer virtual courses for students enrolled in the school district. These courses must be identified in the course code directory. Students who meet the eligibility requirements of s. 1002.455 may participate in these virtual course offerings.
(a) Any eligible student who is enrolled in a school district may register and enroll in an online course offered by his or her school district.
(b)1. Any eligible student who is enrolled in a school district may register and enroll in an online course offered by any other school district in the state. The school district in which the student completes the course shall report the student’s completion of that course for funding pursuant to s. 1011.61(1)(c)1.b.(VI), and the home school district shall not report the student for funding for that course.
2. The full-time equivalent student membership calculated under this subsection is subject to the requirements in s. 1011.61(4). The Department of Education shall establish procedures to enable interdistrict coordination for the delivery and funding of this online option.
(3) Access to courses shall be available to students during the normal school day. A school district may not require a public school student to take a course outside the school day which is in addition to the student’s courses for a given term or on school grounds.
History.s. 7, ch. 2011-137; s. 94, ch. 2012-5; s. 7, ch. 2012-192; s. 10, ch. 2013-45; s. 4, ch. 2013-225.
1Note.As amended by s. 10, ch. 2013-45. The amendment by s. 4, ch. 2013-225, did not include the word “existing.”
1003.499 Florida Approved Courses and Tests (FACT) Initiative.
(1) PURPOSE.
(a) The purpose of the initiative shall be to make available multiple options to suit unique student interests, satisfy educational requirements, and accelerate student accomplishment of goals in a productive and effective manner. The Legislature intends that state and local rules, policies, and administrative decisions are flexible in interpreting and implementing the requirements in this section in order to encourage creative, innovative, resourceful, and forward-thinking practices that can be modeled throughout this state and the country.
(b) Beginning in the 2015-2016 school year, the Florida Approved Courses and Tests (FACT) Initiative shall be implemented to expand student choices in selecting high-quality online courses, including, but not limited to, massive open online courses and instruction included under subsection (2) for promotion or graduation. Such courses and instruction may be provided using a blended learning model that shall include components such as differentiated instruction, flexible scheduling, differentiated teaching, and self-paced learning. Instruction through the blended learning model may be provided using online instructional videos, online class forums, and online homework assignments and projects, coupled with one-on-one direct instructional support to students.
(2) FLORIDA APPROVED COURSES.The Department of Education shall annually publish online a list of providers approved to offer Florida approved courses which shall be listed in the online catalog pursuant to s. 1002.321(6).
(a) As used in this section, the term “Florida approved courses” means online courses provided by individuals which include, but are not limited to, massive open online courses or remedial education associated with the courses that are measured pursuant to s. 1008.22. Massive open online courses may be authorized in the following subject areas: Algebra I, biology, geometry, and civics. Courses may be applied toward requirements for promotion or graduation in whole, in subparts, or in a combination of whole and subparts. A student may not be required to repeat subparts that are satisfactorily completed.
(b) A Florida approved course must be annually identified, approved, published, and shared for consideration by interested students and school districts. The Commissioner of Education shall approve each Florida approved course for application in K-12 public schools in accordance with rules of the State Board of Education.
(3) PROVIDER REQUIREMENTS.
(a) To be approved by the Department of Education, an individual provider must provide all the following documentation that demonstrates that he or she:
1. Is nonsectarian regarding courses, enrollment policies, employment practices, and operations.
2. Complies with the antidiscrimination provisions of s. 1000.05.
3. Requires all instructional staff to be Florida-certified teachers under chapter 1012 or certified as adjunct educators under s. 1012.57 and conducts background screenings for all employees or contracted personnel, as required by s. 1012.32, using state and national criminal history records.
4. Provides to parents and students specific information posted and accessible online which includes, but is not limited to, the following teacher-parent and teacher-student contact information for each course:
a. How to contact the instructor via telephone, e-mail, or online messaging tools.
b. How to contact technical support via telephone, e-mail, or online messaging tools.
c. How to contact the administration office or an individual offering online courses, including, but not limited to, massive open online courses, via telephone, e-mail, or online messaging tools.
d. Any requirement for regular contact with the instructor for the course and clear expectations for meeting the requirement.
5. Possesses prior, successful experience offering online courses to elementary, middle, or high school students as demonstrated by quantified student learning gains or student growth in each subject area and grade level provided for consideration as an instructional program option. However, for a provider without sufficient prior, successful experience offering online courses, the department may conditionally approve the provider to offer courses measured by the statewide assessment program pursuant to s. 1008.22. Conditional approval is valid for 1 year. Renewal of provider approval is contingent on sufficient performance data available demonstrating success in accordance with this section and State Board of Education rule.
6. Ensures instructional and curricular quality through a detailed curriculum and student performance accountability plan that addresses every subject and grade level that the provider intends to provide through contract with the school district, including all of the following:
a. Courses and programs that meet the standards of the International Association for K-12 Online Learning and the Southern Regional Education Board.
b. Instructional content and services that align with, and measure student attainment of, student proficiency in the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards.
c. Mechanisms that determine and ensure that a student has satisfied requirements for grade level promotion and high school graduation with a standard diploma, as appropriate.
7. Publishes for the general public, in accordance with disclosure requirements adopted in rule by the State Board of Education, as part of the application as a provider and in all contracts negotiated pursuant to this section all of the following information:
a. Certification status and physical location of all administrative and instructional personnel.
b. Hours and times of availability of instructional personnel.
c. Student-teacher ratios.
d. Student completion and promotion rates.
e. Student, educator, and school performance accountability outcomes.
(b) Each approved provider contracted under this section must participate in the statewide assessment program under s. 1008.22 and in the state’s education performance accountability system under s. 1008.31.
History.s. 5, ch. 2013-225.
1003.4995 Fine arts report.The Commissioner of Education shall prepare an annual report that includes a description, based on annual reporting by schools, of student access to and participation in fine arts courses, which are visual arts, music, dance, and theatre courses; the number and certification status of educators providing instruction in the courses; educational facilities designed and classroom space equipped for fine arts instruction; and the manner in which schools are providing the core curricular content for fine arts established in the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards. The report shall be posted on the Department of Education’s website and updated annually.
History.s. 35, ch. 2014-184.
PART V
SPECIALIZED INSTRUCTION FOR
CERTAIN PUBLIC K-12 STUDENTS
1003.51 Other public educational services.
1003.52 Educational services in Department of Juvenile Justice programs.
1003.53 Dropout prevention and academic intervention.
1003.54 Teenage parent programs.
1003.55 Instructional programs for blind or visually impaired students and deaf or hard-of-hearing students.
1003.56 English language instruction for limited English proficient students.
1003.57 Exceptional students instruction.
1003.571 Instruction for exceptional students who have a disability.
1003.5715 Parental consent; individual education plan.
1003.5716 Transition to postsecondary education and career opportunities.
1003.572 Collaboration of public and private instructional personnel.
1003.573 Use of restraint and seclusion on students with disabilities.
1003.575 Assistive technology devices; findings; interagency agreements.
1003.576 Individual education plans for exceptional students.
1003.58 Students in residential care facilities.
1003.51 Other public educational services.
(1) The general control of other public educational services shall be vested in the State Board of Education except as provided in this section. The State Board of Education shall, at the request of the Department of Children and Families and the Department of Juvenile Justice, advise as to standards and requirements relating to education to be met in all state schools or institutions under their control which provide educational programs. The Department of Education shall provide supervisory services for the educational programs of all such schools or institutions. The direct control of any of these services provided as part of the district program of education shall rest with the district school board. These services shall be supported out of state, district, federal, or other funds, depending on the requirements of the services being supported.
(2) The State Board of Education shall adopt rules articulating expectations for effective education programs for students in Department of Juvenile Justice programs, including, but not limited to, education programs in juvenile justice prevention, day treatment, residential, and detention programs. The rule shall establish policies and standards for education programs for students in Department of Juvenile Justice programs and shall include the following:
(a) The interagency collaborative process needed to ensure effective programs with measurable results.
(b) The responsibilities of the Department of Education, the Department of Juvenile Justice, Workforce Florida, Inc., district school boards, and providers of education services to students in Department of Juvenile Justice programs.
(c) Academic expectations.
(d) Career expectations.
(e) Education transition planning and services.
(f) Service delivery options available to district school boards, including direct service and contracting.
(g) Assessment procedures, which:
1. For prevention, day treatment, and residential programs, include appropriate academic and career assessments administered at program entry and exit that are selected by the Department of Education in partnership with representatives from the Department of Juvenile Justice, district school boards, and education providers. Assessments must be completed within the first 10 school days after a student’s entry into the program.
2. Provide for determination of the areas of academic need and strategies for appropriate intervention and instruction for each student in a detention facility within 5 school days after the student’s entry into the program and administer a research-based assessment that will assist the student in determining his or her educational and career options and goals within 22 school days after the student’s entry into the program.

The results of these assessments, together with a portfolio depicting the student’s academic and career accomplishments, shall be included in the discharge packet assembled for each student.

(h) Recommended instructional programs, including, but not limited to:
1. Secondary education.
2. High school equivalency examination preparation.
3. Postsecondary education.
4. Career and professional education (CAPE).
5. Job preparation.
6. Virtual education that:
a. Provides competency-based instruction that addresses the unique academic needs of the student through delivery by an entity accredited by AdvanceED or the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.
b. Confers certifications and diplomas.
c. Issues credit that articulates with and transcripts that are recognized by secondary schools.
d. Allows the student to continue to access and progress through the program once the student leaves the juvenile justice system.
(i) Funding requirements, which shall include the requirement that at least 90 percent of the FEFP funds generated by students in Department of Juvenile Justice programs or in an education program for juveniles under s. 985.19 be spent on instructional costs for those students. One hundred percent of the formula-based categorical funds generated by students in Department of Juvenile Justice programs must be spent on appropriate categoricals such as instructional materials and public school technology for those students.
(j) Qualifications of instructional staff, procedures for the selection of instructional staff, and procedures for consistent instruction and qualified staff year round. Qualifications shall include those for instructors of CAPE courses, standardized across the state, and shall be based on state certification, local school district approval, and industry-recognized certifications as identified on the Industry Certification Funding List. Procedures for the use of noncertified instructional personnel who possess expert knowledge or experience in their fields of instruction shall be established.
(k) Transition services, including the roles and responsibilities of appropriate personnel in the juvenile justice education program, the school district where the student will reenter, provider organizations, and the Department of Juvenile Justice.
(l) Procedures and timeframe for transfer of education records when a student enters and leaves a Department of Juvenile Justice education program.
(m) The requirement that each district school board maintain an academic transcript for each student enrolled in a juvenile justice education program that delineates each course completed by the student as provided by the State Course Code Directory.
(n) The requirement that each district school board make available and transmit a copy of a student’s transcript in the discharge packet when the student exits a juvenile justice education program.
(o) Contract requirements.
(p) Performance expectations for providers and district school boards, including student performance measures by type of program, education program performance ratings, school improvement, and corrective action plans for low-performing programs.
(q) The role and responsibility of the district school board in securing workforce development funds.
(r) A series of graduated sanctions for district school boards whose educational programs in Department of Juvenile Justice programs are considered to be unsatisfactory and for instances in which district school boards fail to meet standards prescribed by law, rule, or State Board of Education policy. These sanctions shall include the option of requiring a district school board to contract with a provider or another district school board if the educational program at the Department of Juvenile Justice program is performing below minimum standards and, after 6 months, is still performing below minimum standards.
(s) Curriculum, guidance counseling, transition, and education services expectations, including curriculum flexibility for detention centers operated by the Department of Juvenile Justice.
(t) Other aspects of program operations.
(3) The Department of Education in partnership with the Department of Juvenile Justice, the district school boards, and providers shall:
(a) Develop and implement requirements for contracts and cooperative agreements regarding the delivery of appropriate education services to students in Department of Juvenile Justice education programs. The minimum contract requirements shall include, but are not limited to, payment structure and amounts; access to district services; contract management provisions; data reporting requirements, including reporting of full-time equivalent student membership; administration of federal programs such as Title I, exceptional student education, and the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006; and the policy and standards included in subsection (2).
(b) Develop and implement procedures for transitioning students into and out of Department of Juvenile Justice education programs. These procedures shall reflect the policy and standards adopted pursuant to subsection (2).
(c) Maintain standardized required content of education records to be included as part of a student’s commitment record and procedures for securing the student’s records. The education records shall include, but not be limited to, the following:
1. A copy of the student’s individual educational plan.
2. A copy of the student’s individualized progress monitoring plan.
3. A copy of the student’s individualized transition plan.
4. Data on student performance on assessments taken according to s. 1008.22.
5. A copy of the student’s permanent cumulative record.
6. A copy of the student’s academic transcript.
7. A portfolio reflecting the student’s academic accomplishments and industry certification earned, when age appropriate, while in the Department of Juvenile Justice program.
(d) Establish the roles and responsibilities of the juvenile probation officer and others involved in the withdrawal of the student from school and assignment to a juvenile justice education program.
(4) Each district school board shall:
(a) Notify students in juvenile justice education programs who attain the age of 16 years of the law regarding compulsory school attendance and make available the option of enrolling in an education program to attain a Florida high school diploma by taking the high school equivalency examination before release from the program. The Department of Education shall assist juvenile justice education programs with becoming high school equivalency examination centers.
(b) Respond to requests for student education records received from another district school board or a juvenile justice education program within 5 working days after receiving the request.
(c) Provide access to courses offered pursuant to ss. 1002.37, 1002.45, and 1003.498. School districts and providers may enter into cooperative agreements for the provision of curriculum associated with courses offered pursuant to s. 1003.498 to enable providers to offer such courses.
(d) Complete the assessment process required by subsection (2).
(e) Monitor compliance with contracts for education programs for students in juvenile justice prevention, day treatment, residential, and detention programs.
(5) The Department of Education shall establish and operate, either directly or indirectly through a contract, a mechanism to provide accountability measures that annually assesses and evaluates all juvenile justice education programs using student performance data and program performance ratings by type of program and shall provide technical assistance and related research to district school boards and juvenile justice education providers. The Department of Education, with input from the Department of Juvenile Justice, school districts, and education providers, shall develop annual recommendations for system and school improvement.
History.s. 145, ch. 2002-387; s. 3, ch. 2004-333; s. 85, ch. 2004-357; s. 28, ch. 2006-74; s. 172, ch. 2007-5; s. 7, ch. 2007-234; s. 37, ch. 2011-5; s. 29, ch. 2013-27; s. 368, ch. 2014-19; s. 17, ch. 2014-20; s. 31, ch. 2014-184.
1003.52 Educational services in Department of Juvenile Justice programs.
(1) The Department of Education shall serve as the lead agency for juvenile justice education programs, curriculum, support services, and resources. To this end, the Department of Education and the Department of Juvenile Justice shall each designate a Coordinator for Juvenile Justice Education Programs to serve as the point of contact for resolving issues not addressed by district school boards and to provide each department’s participation in the following activities:
(a) Training, collaborating, and coordinating with district school boards, regional workforce boards, and local youth councils, educational contract providers, and juvenile justice providers, whether state operated or contracted.
(b) Collecting information on the academic, career and professional education (CAPE), and transition performance of students in juvenile justice programs and reporting on the results.
(c) Developing academic and CAPE protocols that provide guidance to district school boards and juvenile justice education providers in all aspects of education programming, including records transfer and transition.
(d) Implementing a joint accountability, program performance, and program improvement process.

Annually, a cooperative agreement and plan for juvenile justice education service enhancement shall be developed between the Department of Juvenile Justice and the Department of Education and submitted to the Secretary of Juvenile Justice and the Commissioner of Education by June 30. The plan shall include, at a minimum, each agency’s role regarding educational program accountability, technical assistance, training, and coordination of services.

(2) Students participating in Department of Juvenile Justice education programs pursuant to chapter 985 which are sponsored by a community-based agency or are operated or contracted for by the Department of Juvenile Justice shall receive education programs according to rules of the State Board of Education. These students shall be eligible for services afforded to students enrolled in programs pursuant to s. 1003.53 and all corresponding State Board of Education rules.
(3) The district school board of the county in which the juvenile justice education prevention, day treatment, residential, or detention program is located shall provide or contract for appropriate educational assessments and an appropriate program of instruction and special education services.
(a) The district school board shall make provisions for each student to participate in basic, CAPE, and exceptional student programs as appropriate. Students served in Department of Juvenile Justice education programs shall have access to the appropriate courses and instruction to prepare them for the high school equivalency examination. Students participating in high school equivalency examination preparation programs shall be funded at the basic program cost factor for Department of Juvenile Justice programs in the Florida Education Finance Program. Each program shall be conducted according to applicable law providing for the operation of public schools and rules of the State Board of Education. School districts shall provide the high school equivalency examination exit option for all juvenile justice education programs.
(b) The Department of Education, with the assistance of the school districts and juvenile justice education providers, shall select a common student assessment instrument and protocol for measuring student learning gains and student progression while a student is in a juvenile justice education program. The Department of Education and the Department of Juvenile Justice shall jointly review the effectiveness of this assessment and implement changes as necessary.
(4) Educational services shall be provided at times of the day most appropriate for the juvenile justice program. School programming in juvenile justice detention, prevention, day treatment, and residential programs shall be made available by the local school district during the juvenile justice school year, as provided in s. 1003.01(11). In addition, students in juvenile justice education programs shall have access to courses offered pursuant to ss. 1002.37, 1002.45, and 1003.498. The Department of Education and the school districts shall adopt policies necessary to provide such access.
(5) The educational program shall provide instruction based on each student’s individualized transition plan, assessed educational needs, and the education programs available in the school district in which the student will return. Depending on the student’s needs, educational programming may consist of remedial courses, academic courses required for grade advancement, CAPE courses, high school equivalency examination preparation, or exceptional student education curricula and related services which support the transition goals and reentry and which may lead to completion of the requirements for receipt of a high school diploma or its equivalent. Prevention and day treatment juvenile justice education programs, at a minimum, shall provide career readiness and exploration opportunities as well as truancy and dropout prevention intervention services. Residential juvenile justice education programs with a contracted minimum length of stay of 9 months shall provide CAPE courses that lead to preapprentice certifications and industry certifications. Programs with contracted lengths of stay of less than 9 months may provide career education courses that lead to preapprentice certifications and CAPE industry certifications. If the duration of a program is less than 40 days, the educational component may be limited to tutorial remediation activities, career employability skills instruction, education counseling, and transition services that prepare students for a return to school, the community, and their home settings based on the students’ needs.
(6) Participation in the program by students of compulsory school-attendance age as provided for in s. 1003.21 shall be mandatory. All students of noncompulsory school-attendance age who have not received a high school diploma or its equivalent shall participate in the educational program, unless the student files a formal declaration of his or her intent to terminate school enrollment as described in s. 1003.21 and is afforded the opportunity to take the high school equivalency examination and attain a Florida high school diploma before release from a juvenile justice education program. A student who has received a high school diploma or its equivalent and is not employed shall participate in workforce development or other CAPE education or Florida College System institution or university courses while in the program, subject to available funding.
(7) An individualized progress monitoring plan shall be developed for all students not classified as exceptional education students upon entry in a juvenile justice education program and upon reentry in the school district. These plans shall address academic, literacy, and career and technical skills and shall include provisions for intensive remedial instruction in the areas of weakness.
(8) Each district school board shall maintain an academic record for each student enrolled in a juvenile justice education program as prescribed by s. 1003.51. Such record shall delineate each course completed by the student according to procedures in the State Course Code Directory. The district school board shall include a copy of a student’s academic record in the discharge packet when the student exits the program.
(9) Each district school board shall make provisions for high school level students to earn credits toward high school graduation while in residential and nonresidential juvenile justice education programs. Provisions must be made for the transfer of credits and partial credits earned.
(10) School districts and juvenile justice education providers shall develop individualized transition plans during the course of a student’s stay in a juvenile justice education program to coordinate academic, career and technical, and secondary and postsecondary services that assist the student in successful community reintegration upon release. Development of the transition plan shall be a collaboration of the personnel in the juvenile justice education program, reentry personnel, personnel from the school district where the student will return, the student, the student’s family, and Department of Juvenile Justice personnel for committed students.
(a) Transition planning must begin upon a student’s placement in the program. The transition plan must include, at a minimum:
1. Services and interventions that address the student’s assessed educational needs and postrelease education plans.
2. Services to be provided during the program stay and services to be implemented upon release, including, but not limited to, continuing education in secondary school, CAPE programs, postsecondary education, or employment, based on the student’s needs.
3. Specific monitoring responsibilities to determine whether the individualized transition plan is being implemented and the student is provided access to support services that will sustain the student’s success by individuals who are responsible for the reintegration and coordination of these activities.
(b) For the purpose of transition planning and reentry services, representatives from the school district and the one-stop center where the student will return shall participate as members of the local Department of Juvenile Justice reentry teams. The school district, upon return of a student from a juvenile justice education program, must consider the individual needs and circumstances of the student and the transition plan recommendations when reenrolling a student in a public school. A local school district may not maintain a standardized policy for all students returning from a juvenile justice program but place students based on their needs and their performance in the juvenile justice education program, including any virtual education options.
(c) The Department of Education and the Department of Juvenile Justice shall provide oversight and guidance to school districts, education providers, and reentry personnel on how to implement effective educational transition planning and services.
(11) The district school board shall recruit and train teachers who are interested, qualified, or experienced in educating students in juvenile justice programs. Students in juvenile justice programs shall be provided a wide range of education programs and opportunities including textbooks, technology, instructional support, and resources commensurate with resources provided to students in public schools, including textbooks and access to technology. If the district school board operates a juvenile justice education program at a juvenile justice facility, the district school board, in consultation with the director of the juvenile justice facility, shall select the instructional personnel assigned to that program. The Secretary of Juvenile Justice or the director of a juvenile justice program may request that the performance of a teacher assigned by the district to a juvenile justice education program be reviewed by the district and that the teacher be reassigned based upon an evaluation conducted pursuant to s. 1012.34 or for inappropriate behavior. Juvenile justice education programs shall have access to the substitute teacher pool used by the district school board.
(12) District school boards may contract with a private provider for the provision of education programs to students placed with the Department of Juvenile Justice and shall generate local, state, and federal funding, including funding through the Florida Education Finance Program for such students. The district school board’s planning and budgeting process shall include the needs of Department of Juvenile Justice education programs in the district school board’s plan for expenditures for state categorical and federal funds.
(13)(a) Funding for eligible students enrolled in juvenile justice education programs shall be provided through the Florida Education Finance Program as provided in s. 1011.62 and the General Appropriations Act. Funding shall include, at a minimum:
1. Weighted program funding or the basic amount for current operation multiplied by the district cost differential as provided in s. 1011.62(2);
2. The supplemental allocation for juvenile justice education as provided in s. 1011.62(10);
3. A proportionate share of the district’s exceptional student education guaranteed allocation, the supplemental academic instruction allocation, and the instructional materials allocation;
4. An amount equivalent to the proportionate share of the state average potential discretionary local effort for operations, which shall be determined as follows:
a. If the district levies the maximum discretionary local effort and the district’s discretionary local effort per FTE is less than the state average potential discretionary local effort per FTE, the proportionate share shall include both the discretionary local effort and the compression supplement per FTE. If the district’s discretionary local effort per FTE is greater than the state average per FTE, the proportionate share shall be equal to the state average; or
b. If the district does not levy the maximum discretionary local effort and the district’s actual discretionary local effort per FTE is less than the state average potential discretionary local effort per FTE, the proportionate share shall be equal to the district’s actual discretionary local effort per FTE. If the district’s actual discretionary local effort per FTE is greater than the state average per FTE, the proportionate share shall be equal to the state average potential local effort per FTE; and
5. A proportionate share of the district’s proration to funds available, if necessary.
(b) Juvenile justice education programs to receive the appropriate FEFP funding for Department of Juvenile Justice education programs shall include those operated through a contract with the Department of Juvenile Justice.
(c) Consistent with the rules of the State Board of Education, district school boards shall request an alternative FTE survey for Department of Juvenile Justice education programs experiencing fluctuations in student enrollment.
(d) FTE count periods shall be prescribed in rules of the State Board of Education and shall be the same for programs of the Department of Juvenile Justice as for other public school programs. The summer school period for students in Department of Juvenile Justice education programs shall begin on the day immediately following the end of the regular school year and end on the day immediately preceding the subsequent regular school year. Students shall be funded for no more than 25 hours per week of direct instruction.
(e) Each juvenile justice education program must receive all federal funds for which the program is eligible.
(14) Each district school board shall negotiate a cooperative agreement with the Department of Juvenile Justice on the delivery of educational services to students under the jurisdiction of the Department of Juvenile Justice. Such agreement must include, but is not limited to:
(a) Roles and responsibilities of each agency, including the roles and responsibilities of contract providers.
(b) Administrative issues including procedures for sharing information.
(c) Allocation of resources including maximization of local, state, and federal funding.
(d) Procedures for educational evaluation for educational exceptionalities and special needs.
(e) Curriculum and delivery of instruction.
(f) Classroom management procedures and attendance policies.
(g) Procedures for provision of qualified instructional personnel, whether supplied by the district school board or provided under contract by the provider, and for performance of duties while in a juvenile justice setting.
(h) Provisions for improving skills in teaching and working with students referred to juvenile justice education programs.
(i) Transition plans for students moving into and out of juvenile justice education programs.
(j) Procedures and timelines for the timely documentation of credits earned and transfer of student records.
(k) Methods and procedures for dispute resolution.
(l) Provisions for ensuring the safety of education personnel and support for the agreed-upon education program.
(m) Strategies for correcting any deficiencies found through the accountability and evaluation system and student performance measures.
(15) Nothing in this section or in a cooperative agreement requires the district school board to provide more services than can be supported by the funds generated by students in the juvenile justice programs.
(16) The Department of Education, in consultation with the Department of Juvenile Justice, district school boards, and providers, shall adopt rules establishing:
(a) Objective and measurable student performance measures to evaluate a student’s educational progress while participating in a prevention, day treatment, or residential program. The student performance measures must be based on appropriate outcomes for all students in juvenile justice education programs, taking into consideration the student’s length of stay in the program. Performance measures shall include outcomes that relate to student achievement of career education goals, acquisition of employability skills, receipt of a high school diploma or its equivalent, grade advancement, and the number of CAPE industry certifications earned.
(b) A performance rating system to be used by the Department of Education to evaluate the delivery of educational services within each of the juvenile justice programs. The performance rating shall be primarily based on data regarding student performance as described in paragraph (a).
(c) The timeframes, procedures, and resources to be used to improve a low-rated educational program or to terminate or reassign the program.
(d) The Department of Education, in partnership with the Department of Juvenile Justice, shall develop a comprehensive accountability and program improvement process. The accountability and program improvement process shall be based on student performance measures by type of program and shall rate education program performance. The accountability system shall identify and recognize high-performing education programs. The Department of Education, in partnership with the Department of Juvenile Justice, shall identify low-performing programs. Low-performing education programs shall receive an onsite program evaluation from the Department of Juvenile Justice. School improvement, technical assistance, or the reassignment of the program shall be based, in part, on the results of the program evaluation. Through a corrective action process, low-performing programs must demonstrate improvement or reassign the program.
(17) The department, in collaboration with the Department of Juvenile Justice, shall collect data and report on commitment, day treatment, prevention, and detention programs. The report shall be submitted to the President of the Senate, the Speaker of the House of Representatives, and the Governor by February 1 of each year. The report must include, at a minimum:
(a) The number and percentage of students who:
1. Return to an alternative school, middle school, or high school upon release and the attendance rate of such students before and after participation in juvenile justice education programs.
2. Receive a standard high school diploma or a high school equivalency diploma.
3. Receive industry certification.
4. Enroll in a postsecondary educational institution.
5. Complete a juvenile justice education program without reoffending.
6. Reoffend within 1 year after completion of a day treatment or residential commitment program.
7. Remain employed 1 year after completion of a day treatment or residential commitment program.
8. Demonstrate learning gains pursuant to paragraph (3)(b).
(b) The following cost data for each juvenile justice education program:
1. The amount of funding provided by district school boards to juvenile justice programs and the amount retained for administration, including documenting the purposes of such expenses.
2. The status of the development of cooperative agreements.
3. Recommendations for system improvement.
4. Information on the identification of, and services provided to, exceptional students, to determine whether these students are properly reported for funding and are appropriately served.
(18) The district school board shall not be charged any rent, maintenance, utilities, or overhead on such facilities. Maintenance, repairs, and remodeling of existing facilities shall be provided by the Department of Juvenile Justice.
(19) When additional facilities are required, the district school board and the Department of Juvenile Justice shall agree on the appropriate site based on the instructional needs of the students. When the most appropriate site for instruction is on district school board property, a special capital outlay request shall be made by the commissioner in accordance with s. 1013.60. When the most appropriate site is on state property, state capital outlay funds shall be requested by the Department of Juvenile Justice provided by s. 216.043 and shall be submitted as specified by s. 216.023. Any instructional facility to be built on state property shall have educational specifications jointly developed by the district school board and the Department of Juvenile Justice and approved by the Department of Education. The size of space and occupant design capacity criteria as provided by State Board of Education rules shall be used for remodeling or new construction whether facilities are provided on state property or district school board property.
(20) The parent of an exceptional student shall have the due process rights provided for in this chapter.
(21) The education programs at the Florida School for Boys in Okeechobee shall be operated by the Department of Education, either directly or through grants or contractual agreements with other public or duly accredited education agencies approved by the Department of Education.
(22) The State Board of Education shall adopt rules necessary to implement this section. Such rules must require the minimum amount of paperwork and reporting.
(23) The Department of Juvenile Justice and the Department of Education, in consultation with Workforce Florida, Inc., the statewide Workforce Development Youth Council, district school boards, Florida College System institutions, providers, and others, shall jointly develop a multiagency plan for CAPE which describes the funding, curriculum, transfer of credits, goals, and outcome measures for career education programming in juvenile commitment facilities, pursuant to s. 985.622. The plan must be reviewed annually.
History.s. 146, ch. 2002-387; s. 166, ch. 2004-5; s. 40, ch. 2004-41; s. 4, ch. 2004-333; s. 86, ch. 2004-357; s. 29, ch. 2006-74; s. 127, ch. 2006-120; s. 15, ch. 2010-154; s. 38, ch. 2011-5; s. 14, ch. 2011-37; s. 12, ch. 2012-133; s. 119, ch. 2013-15; s. 181, ch. 2014-17; s. 18, ch. 2014-20; s. 32, ch. 2014-184.
1003.53 Dropout prevention and academic intervention.
(1)(a) Dropout prevention and academic intervention programs may differ from traditional educational programs and schools in scheduling, administrative structure, philosophy, curriculum, or setting and shall employ alternative teaching methodologies, curricula, learning activities, and diagnostic and assessment procedures in order to meet the needs, interests, abilities, and talents of eligible students. The educational program shall provide curricula, character development and law education, and related services that support the program goals and lead to improved performance in the areas of academic achievement, attendance, and discipline. Student participation in such programs shall be voluntary. District school boards may, however, assign students to a program for disruptive students. Notwithstanding any other provision of law to the contrary, no student shall be identified as being eligible to receive services funded through the dropout prevention and academic intervention program based solely on the student being from a single-parent family.
(b) Students in grades 1-12 shall be eligible for dropout prevention and academic intervention programs. Eligible students shall be reported in the appropriate basic cost factor in the Florida Education Finance Program. The strategies and supports provided to eligible students shall be funded through the General Appropriations Act and may include, but are not limited to, those services identified on the student’s academic intervention plan.
(c) A student shall be identified as being eligible to receive services funded through the dropout prevention and academic intervention program based upon one of the following criteria:
1. The student is academically unsuccessful as evidenced by low test scores, retention, failing grades, low grade point average, falling behind in earning credits, or not meeting the state or district proficiency levels in reading, mathematics, or writing.
2. The student has a pattern of excessive absenteeism or has been identified as a habitual truant.
3. The student has a history of disruptive behavior in school or has committed an offense that warrants out-of-school suspension or expulsion from school according to the district school board’s code of student conduct. For the purposes of this program, “disruptive behavior” is behavior that:
a. Interferes with the student’s own learning or the educational process of others and requires attention and assistance beyond that which the traditional program can provide or results in frequent conflicts of a disruptive nature while the student is under the jurisdiction of the school either in or out of the classroom; or
b. Severely threatens the general welfare of students or others with whom the student comes into contact.
4. The student is identified by a school’s early warning system pursuant to s. 1001.42(18)(b).
(d)1. “Second chance schools” means district school board programs provided through cooperative agreements between the Department of Juvenile Justice, private providers, state or local law enforcement agencies, or other state agencies for students who have been disruptive or violent or who have committed serious offenses. As partnership programs, second chance schools are eligible for waivers by the Commissioner of Education from State Board of Education rules that prevent the provision of appropriate educational services to violent, severely disruptive, or delinquent students in small nontraditional settings or in court-adjudicated settings.
2. District school boards seeking to enter into a partnership with a private entity or public entity to operate a second chance school for disruptive students may apply to the Department of Education for startup grants. These grants must be available for 1 year and must be used to offset the startup costs for implementing such programs off public school campuses. General operating funds must be generated through the appropriate programs of the Florida Education Finance Program. Grants approved under this program shall be for the full operation of the school by a private nonprofit or for-profit provider or the public entity. This program must operate under rules adopted by the State Board of Education and be implemented to the extent funded by the Legislature.
3. A student enrolled in a sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth, or tenth grade class may be assigned to a second chance school if the student meets the following criteria:
a. The student is a habitual truant as defined in s. 1003.01.
b. The student’s excessive absences have detrimentally affected the student’s academic progress and the student may have unique needs that a traditional school setting may not meet.
c. The student’s high incidences of truancy have been directly linked to a lack of motivation.
d. The student has been identified as at risk of dropping out of school.
4. A student who is habitually truant may be assigned to a second chance school only if the case staffing committee, established pursuant to s. 984.12, determines that such placement could be beneficial to the student and the criteria included in subparagraph 3. are met.
5. A student may be assigned to a second chance school if the district school board in which the student resides has a second chance school and if the student meets one of the following criteria:
a. The student habitually exhibits disruptive behavior in violation of the code of student conduct adopted by the district school board.
b. The student interferes with the student’s own learning or the educational process of others and requires attention and assistance beyond that which the traditional program can provide, or, while the student is under the jurisdiction of the school either in or out of the classroom, frequent conflicts of a disruptive nature occur.
c. The student has committed a serious offense which warrants suspension or expulsion from school according to the district school board’s code of student conduct. For the purposes of this program, “serious offense” is behavior which:
(I) Threatens the general welfare of students or others with whom the student comes into contact;
(II) Includes violence;
(III) Includes possession of weapons or drugs; or
(IV) Is harassment or verbal abuse of school personnel or other students.
6. Prior to assignment of students to second chance schools, district school boards are encouraged to use alternative programs, such as in-school suspension, which provide instruction and counseling leading to improved student behavior, a reduction in the incidence of truancy, and the development of more effective interpersonal skills.
7. Students assigned to second chance schools must be evaluated by the district school board’s child study team before placement in a second chance school. The study team shall ensure that students are not eligible for placement in a program for emotionally disturbed children.
8. Students who exhibit academic and social progress and who wish to return to a traditional school shall complete a character development and law education program and demonstrate preparedness to reenter the regular school setting prior to reentering a traditional school.
(2)(a) Each district school board may establish dropout prevention and academic intervention programs at the elementary, middle, junior high school, or high school level. Programs designed to eliminate patterns of excessive absenteeism or habitual truancy shall emphasize academic performance and may provide specific instruction in the areas of career education, preemployment training, and behavioral management. Such programs shall utilize instructional teaching methods appropriate to the specific needs of the student.
(b) Each school that establishes a dropout prevention and academic intervention program at that school site shall reflect that program in the school improvement plan as required under s. 1001.42(18).
(3) Each district school board receiving state funding for dropout prevention and academic intervention programs through the General Appropriations Act shall submit information through an annual report to the Department of Education’s database documenting the extent to which each of the district’s dropout prevention and academic intervention programs has been successful in the areas of graduation rate, dropout rate, attendance rate, and retention/promotion rate. The department shall compile this information into an annual report which shall be submitted to the presiding officers of the Legislature by February 15.
(4) Each district school board shall establish procedures for ensuring that teachers assigned to dropout prevention and academic intervention programs possess the affective, pedagogical, and content-related skills necessary to meet the needs of these students.
(5) Each district school board providing a dropout prevention and academic intervention program pursuant to this section shall maintain for each participating student records documenting the student’s eligibility, the length of participation, the type of program to which the student was assigned or the type of academic intervention services provided, and an evaluation of the student’s academic and behavioral performance while in the program. The school principal or his or her designee shall, prior to placement in a dropout prevention and academic intervention program or the provision of an academic service, provide written notice of placement or services by certified mail, return receipt requested, to the student’s parent. The parent of the student shall sign an acknowledgment of the notice of placement or service and return the signed acknowledgment to the principal within 3 days after receipt of the notice. The parents of a student assigned to such a dropout prevention and academic intervention program shall be notified in writing and entitled to an administrative review of any action by school personnel relating to such placement pursuant to the provisions of chapter 120.
(6) District school board dropout prevention and academic intervention programs shall be coordinated with social service, law enforcement, prosecutorial, and juvenile justice agencies and juvenile assessment centers in the school district. Notwithstanding the provisions of s. 1002.22, these agencies are authorized to exchange information contained in student records and juvenile justice records. Such information is confidential and exempt from the provisions of s. 119.07(1). District school boards and other agencies receiving such information shall use the information only for official purposes connected with the certification of students for admission to and for the administration of the dropout prevention and academic intervention program, and shall maintain the confidentiality of such information unless otherwise provided by law or rule.
(7) The State Board of Education shall have the authority pursuant to ss. 120.536(1) and 120.54 to adopt rules necessary to implement the provisions of this section; such rules shall require the minimum amount of necessary paperwork and reporting.
History.s. 147, ch. 2002-387; s. 18, ch. 2008-108; s. 8, ch. 2014-184.
1003.54 Teenage parent programs.
(1) Each district school board shall maintain a teenage parent program.
(2) “Teenage parent programs” means educational programs designed to provide a specialized curriculum to meet the needs of students who are pregnant or students who are mothers or fathers and the children of the students.
(3)(a) The program shall provide pregnant students or students who are parents and the children of these students with a comprehensive teenage parent program. The program shall provide pregnant students or students who are parents with the option of participating in regular classroom activities or enrolling in a special program designed to meet their needs pursuant to s. 1003.21. Students participating in teenage parent programs shall be exempt from minimum attendance requirements for absences related to pregnancy or parenting, but shall be required to make up work missed due to absence.
(b) The curriculum shall include instruction in such topics as prenatal and postnatal health care, parenting skills, benefits of sexual abstinence, and consequences of subsequent pregnancies. Parenting skills should include instruction in the stages of child growth and development, methods for aiding in the intellectual, language, physical, and social development of children, and guidance on constructive play activities.
(c) Provision for necessary child care, health care, social services, parent education, and transportation shall be ancillary service components of teenage parent programs. Ancillary services may be provided through the coordination of existing programs and services and through joint agreements between district school boards and early learning coalitions or other appropriate public and private providers.
(d) The district school board shall make adequate provisions for pregnant and parenting teenagers to complete the coursework necessary to earn a high school diploma.
(e) Children enrolled in child care provided by the district shall be funded at the special program cost factor pursuant to s. 1011.62 if the parent or parents are enrolled full time in a public school in the district.
(4) Districts may modify courses listed in the State Course Code Directory for the purpose of providing teenage parent programs pursuant to the provisions of this section. Such modifications must be approved by the commissioner and may include lengthening or shortening of the school time allotted for in-class study, alternate methods of assessment of student performance, and the integration of curriculum frameworks or student performance standards to produce interdisciplinary units of instruction.
(5) The State Board of Education shall adopt rules necessary to implement the provisions of this section.
History.s. 148, ch. 2002-387; s. 14, ch. 2004-484.
1003.55 Instructional programs for blind or visually impaired students and deaf or hard-of-hearing students.
(1) The Department of Education may establish a coordinating unit and instructional materials center for visually impaired students and deaf or hard-of-hearing students to provide staff and resources for the coordination, cataloging, standardizing, producing, procuring, storing, and distributing of braille, large print, tangible apparatus, captioned films and video tapes, and other specialized educational materials needed by these students and other exceptional students. The coordinating unit shall have as its major purpose the improvement of instructional programs for visually impaired students and deaf or hard-of-hearing students and may, as a second priority, extend appropriate services to other exceptional students, consistent with provisions and criteria established, to the extent that resources are available.
(2) The unit shall be operated under rules adopted by the State Board of Education.
(3) As used in this section, the term:
(a) “Blind student” means a student who is eligible for special education services and who:
1. Has a visual acuity of 20/200 or less in the better eye with correcting lenses or has a limited field of vision such that the widest diameter subtends an angular distance of no greater than 20 degrees; or
2. Has a medically indicated expectation of visual deterioration.
(b) “Braille” means the system of reading and writing through touch commonly known as standard English braille.
(c) “Individualized education program” means a written statement developed for a student eligible for special education services pursuant to s. 602(a)(20), Part A of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 20 U.S.C. s. 1401(a).
(4) In developing an individualized written education program for each blind student, the presumption shall be that blind students can communicate effectively and efficiently with the same level of proficiency expected of the students’ peers of comparable ability and grade level. Accordingly, proficiency in reading and writing braille shall be considered during the individualized planning and assessment processes in this context.
(5) Any publisher of a textbook adopted pursuant to the state instructional materials adoption process shall furnish the Department of Education with a computer file in an electronic format specified by the department at least 2 years in advance that is readily translatable to braille and can be used for large print or speech access. Any textbook reproduced pursuant to the provisions of this subsection shall be purchased at a price equal to the price paid for the textbook as adopted. The Department of Education shall not reproduce textbooks obtained pursuant to this subsection in any manner that would generate revenues for the department from the use of such computer files or that would preclude the rightful payment of fees to the publisher for use of all or some portion of the textbook.
(6)(a) In developing an individual education plan for a deaf or hard-of-hearing student, the individual education plan team must consider the student’s language and communication needs, opportunities for direct communication with peers and professional personnel in the student’s language and communication mode, and the student’s academic level and full range of needs, including opportunities for direct instruction in the student’s language and communication mode.
(b) The Department of Education, in coordination with the Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind and with input from education stakeholders, including representatives of the auditory oral community, shall develop a model communication plan which shall be used during the development of a student’s individual education plan. The model shall be adopted in rule by the State Board of Education and made available online to all school districts no later than December 31, 2013. The department shall provide technical assistance for using the model communication plan.
History.s. 149, ch. 2002-387; s. 1, ch. 2013-84.
1003.56 English language instruction for limited English proficient students.
(1) Instruction in the English language shall be provided to limited English proficient students. Such instruction shall be designed to develop the student’s mastery of the four language skills, including listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as rapidly as possible.
(2)(a) “Limited English proficient” or “limited English proficiency,” when used with reference to an individual, means:
1.a. An individual who was not born in the United States and whose native language is a language other than English;
b. An individual who comes from a home environment where a language other than English is spoken in the home; or
c. An individual who is an American Indian or Alaskan native and who comes from an environment where a language other than English has had a significant impact on his or her level of English language proficiency; and
2. Who, by reason thereof, has sufficient difficulty speaking, reading, writing, or listening to the English language to deny such individual the opportunity to learn successfully in classrooms where the language of instruction is English.
(b) “Home language” or “native language,” when used with reference to an individual of limited English proficiency, means the language normally used by such individual or, in the case of a student, the language normally used by the parents of the student.
(c) “ESOL” means English for Speakers of Other Languages and:
1. When modifying instruction, the strategy used to teach limited English proficient students; or
2. When modifying program, the program funded in the Florida Education Finance Program, listed under English for Speakers of Other Languages in s. 1011.62.
(3) Each district school board shall implement the following procedures:
(a) Develop and submit a plan for providing English language instruction for limited English proficient students to the Department of Education for review and approval.
(b) Identify limited English proficient students through assessment.
(c) Provide for student exit from and reclassification into the program.
(d) Provide limited English proficient students ESOL instruction in English and ESOL instruction or home language instruction in the basic subject areas of reading, mathematics, science, social studies, and computer literacy.
(e) Maintain a student plan.
(f) Provide qualified teachers.
(g) Provide equal access to other programs for eligible limited English proficient students based on need.
(h) Provide for parental involvement in the program.
(4) Each district school board’s program for limited English proficient students shall be evaluated and monitored periodically.
(5) The State Board of Education shall adopt rules for the purpose of implementing this section.
History.s. 150, ch. 2002-387.
1003.57 Exceptional students instruction.
(1)(a) For purposes of providing exceptional student instruction under this section:
1. A school district shall use the following terms to describe the instructional setting for a student with a disability, 6 through 21 years of age, who is not educated in a setting accessible to all children who are together at all times:
a. “Exceptional student education center” or “special day school” means a separate public school to which nondisabled peers do not have access.
b. “Other separate environment” means a separate private school, residential facility, or hospital or homebound program.
c. “Regular class” means a class in which a student spends 80 percent or more of the school week with nondisabled peers.
d. “Resource room” means a classroom in which a student spends between 40 percent to 80 percent of the school week with nondisabled peers.
e. “Separate class” means a class in which a student spends less than 40 percent of the school week with nondisabled peers.
2. A school district shall use the term “inclusion” to mean that a student is receiving education in a general education regular class setting, reflecting natural proportions and age-appropriate heterogeneous groups in core academic and elective or special areas within the school community; a student with a disability is a valued member of the classroom and school community; the teachers and administrators support universal education and have knowledge and support available to enable them to effectively teach all children; and a teacher is provided access to technical assistance in best practices, instructional methods, and supports tailored to the student’s needs based on current research.
(b) Each district school board shall provide for an appropriate program of special instruction, facilities, and services for exceptional students as prescribed by the State Board of Education as acceptable, including provisions that:
1. The district school board provide the necessary professional services for diagnosis and evaluation of exceptional students.
2. The district school board provide the special instruction, classes, and services, either within the district school system, in cooperation with other district school systems, or through contractual arrangements with approved private schools or community facilities that meet standards established by the commissioner.
3. The district school board annually provide information describing the Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind and all other programs and methods of instruction available to the parent of a sensory-impaired student.
4. The district school board, once every 3 years, submit to the department its proposed procedures for the provision of special instruction and services for exceptional students.
(c) A student may not be given special instruction or services as an exceptional student until after he or she has been properly evaluated and found eligible as an exceptional student in the manner prescribed by rules of the State Board of Education. The parent of an exceptional student evaluated and found eligible or ineligible shall be notified of each such evaluation and determination. Such notice shall contain a statement informing the parent that he or she is entitled to a due process hearing on the identification, evaluation, and eligibility determination, or lack thereof. Such hearings are exempt from ss. 120.569, 120.57, and 286.011, except to the extent that the State Board of Education adopts rules establishing other procedures. Any records created as a result of such hearings are confidential and exempt from s. 119.07(1). The hearing must be conducted by an administrative law judge from the Division of Administrative Hearings pursuant to a contract between the Department of Education and the Division of Administrative Hearings. The decision of the administrative law judge is final, except that any party aggrieved by the finding and decision rendered by the administrative law judge has the right to bring a civil action in the state circuit court. In such an action, the court shall receive the records of the administrative hearing and shall hear additional evidence at the request of either party. In the alternative, in hearings conducted on behalf of a student who is identified as gifted, any party aggrieved by the finding and decision rendered by the administrative law judge has the right to request a review of the administrative law judge’s order by the district court of appeal as provided in s. 120.68.
(d) Notwithstanding any law to the contrary, during the pendency of any proceeding conducted pursuant to this section, unless the district school board and the parents otherwise agree, the student shall remain in his or her then-current educational assignment or, if applying for initial admission to a public school, shall be assigned, with the consent of the parents, in the public school program until all such proceedings have been completed.
(e) In providing for the education of exceptional students, the district school superintendent, principals, and teachers shall utilize the regular school facilities and adapt them to the needs of exceptional students to the maximum extent appropriate. To the extent appropriate, students with disabilities, including those students in public or private institutions or other facilities, shall be educated with students who are not disabled. Segregation of exceptional students shall occur only if the nature or severity of the exceptionality is such that education in regular classes with the use of supplementary aids and services cannot be achieved satisfactorily.
(f) Once every 3 years, each school district and school shall complete a Best Practices in Inclusive Education (BPIE) assessment with a Florida Inclusion Network facilitator and include the results of the BPIE assessment and all planned short-term and long-term improvement efforts in the school district’s exceptional student education policies and procedures. BPIE is an internal assessment process designed to facilitate the analysis, implementation, and improvement of inclusive educational practices at the district and school team levels.
(g) In addition to the services agreed to in a student’s individual educational plan, the district school superintendent shall fully inform the parent of a student having a physical or developmental disability of all available services that are appropriate for the student’s disability. The superintendent shall provide the student’s parent with a summary of the student’s rights.
(h) School personnel may consider any unique circumstances on a case-by-case basis when determining whether a change in placement is appropriate for a student who has a disability and violates a district school board’s code of student conduct. School personnel may remove and place such student in an interim alternative educational setting for not more than 45 school days, without regard to whether the behavior is determined to be a manifestation of the student’s disability, if the student:
1. Carries a weapon to or possesses a weapon at school, on school premises, or at a school function under the jurisdiction of the school district;
2. Knowingly possesses or uses illegal drugs, or sells or solicits the sale of a controlled substance, while at school, on school premises, or at a school function under the jurisdiction of the school district; or
3. Has inflicted serious bodily injury upon another person while at school, on school premises, or at a school function under the jurisdiction of the school district.
(i) For purposes of paragraph (h), the term:
1. “Controlled substance” means a drug or other substance identified under Schedule I, Schedule II, Schedule III, Schedule IV, or Schedule V of the Controlled Substances Act, 21 U.S.C. s. 812(c) and s. 893.02(4).
2. “Weapon” means a device, instrument, material, or substance, animate or inanimate, which is used for, or is readily capable of, causing death or serious bodily injury; however, this definition does not include a pocketknife having a blade that is less than 21/2 inches in length.
(j) The district school board shall provide each parent with information regarding the amount that the school district receives from the state appropriation for each of the five exceptional student education support levels for a full-time student. The school district shall provide this information at the initial meeting of a student’s individual education plan team.
(2)(a) An exceptional student with a disability who resides in a residential facility and receives special instruction or services is considered a resident of the state in which the student’s parent is a resident. The cost of such instruction, facilities, and services for a nonresident student with a disability shall be provided by the placing authority in the student’s state of residence, such as a public school entity, other placing authority, or parent. A nonresident student with a disability may not be reported by any school district for FTE funding in the Florida Education Finance Program.
(b) The Department of Education shall provide to each school district a statement of the specific limitations of the district’s financial obligation for exceptional students with disabilities under federal and state law. The department shall also provide to each school district technical assistance as necessary for developing a local plan to impose on a student’s home state the fiscal responsibility for educating a nonresident exceptional student with a disability.
(c) The Department of Education shall develop a process by which a school district must, before providing services to an exceptional student with a disability who resides in a residential facility in this state, review the residency of the student. The residential facility, not the district, is responsible for billing and collecting from a nonresidential student’s home state payment for the student’s educational and related services.
(d) The Department of Education shall formulate an interagency agreement or other mechanism for billing and collecting from a nonresidential student’s home state payment for the student’s educational and related services.
(e) This subsection applies to any nonresident student with a disability who resides in a residential facility and who receives instruction as an exceptional student with a disability in any type of residential facility in this state, including, but not limited to, a public school, a private school, a group home facility as defined in s. 393.063, an intensive residential treatment program for children and adolescents as defined in s. 395.002, a facility as defined in s. 394.455, an intermediate care facility for the developmentally disabled or ICF/DD as defined in s. 393.063 or s. 400.960, or a community residential home as defined in s. 419.001.
(3)(a) For purposes of this subsection and subsection (4), the term:
1. “Agency” means the Department of Children and Families or its contracted lead agency, the Agency for Persons with Disabilities, and the Agency for Health Care Administration.
2. “Exceptional student” means an exceptional student, as defined in s. 1003.01, who has a disability.
3. “Receiving school district” means the district in which a private residential care facility is located.
4. “Placement” means the funding or arrangement of funding by an agency for all or a part of the cost for an exceptional student to reside in a private residential care facility and the placement crosses school district lines.
(b) Within 10 business days after an exceptional student is placed in a private residential care facility by an agency, the agency or private residential care facility licensed by the agency, as appropriate, shall provide written notification of the placement to the school district where the student is currently counted for funding purposes under s. 1011.62 and the receiving school district. The exceptional student shall be enrolled in school and receive a free and appropriate public education, special education, and related services while the notice and procedures regarding payment are pending. This paragraph applies when the placement is for the primary purpose of addressing residential or other noneducational needs and the placement crosses school district lines.
(c) Within 10 business days after receiving the notification, the receiving school district must review the student’s individual educational plan (IEP) to determine if the student’s IEP can be implemented by the receiving school district or by a provider or facility under contract with the receiving school district. The receiving school district shall:
1. Provide educational instruction to the student;
2. Contract with another provider or facility to provide the educational instruction;
3. Contract with the private residential care facility in which the student resides to provide the educational instruction; or
4. Decline to provide or contract for educational instruction.

If the receiving school district declines to provide or contract for the educational instruction, the school district in which the legal residence of the student is located shall provide or contract for the educational instruction to the student. The school district that provides educational instruction or contracts to provide educational instruction shall report the student for funding purposes pursuant to s. 1011.62.

(d)1. The Department of Education, in consultation with the agencies and school districts, shall develop procedures for written notification to school districts regarding the placement of an exceptional student in a residential care facility. The procedures must:
a. Provide for written notification of a placement that crosses school district lines; and
b. Identify the entity responsible for the notification for each facility that is operated, licensed, or regulated by an agency.
2. The State Board of Education shall adopt the procedures by rule pursuant to ss. 120.536(1) and 120.54, and the agencies shall implement the procedures.

The requirements of paragraphs (c) and (d) do not apply to written agreements among school districts which specify each school district’s responsibility for providing and paying for educational services to an exceptional student in a residential care facility. However, each agreement must require a school district to review the student’s IEP within 10 business days after receiving the notification required under paragraph (b).

(4) The Department of Education and agencies shall enter into an agreement for interagency coordination regarding the placement of exceptional students in residential facilities, consistent with federal law and regulations, on or before January 1, 2010. The agreement shall identify the responsibilities of each party and ensure that students receive special education and related services necessary to receive a free appropriate public education. The agreement shall also establish procedures for:
(a) Resolving interagency disputes;
(b) Ensuring the provision of services during the pendency of a dispute; and
(c) Ensuring continued Medicaid eligibility as deemed appropriate.
(5) Each full-time virtual instruction program under s. 1002.37 or s. 1002.45 must fulfill the obligations of a school district under this section for public school exceptional students who are enrolled in a full-time virtual instruction program. A student whose individual educational plan indicates that full-time virtual instruction is appropriate may be enrolled in a full-time virtual instruction program.
History.s. 151, ch. 2002-387; s. 30, ch. 2006-74; s. 7, ch. 2009-35; s. 1, ch. 2009-238; s. 127, ch. 2010-5; s. 8, ch. 2012-192; s. 3, ch. 2013-236; s. 369, ch. 2014-19; s. 47, ch. 2014-39.
1003.571 Instruction for exceptional students who have a disability.
(1) The State Board of Education shall comply with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), as amended, and its implementing regulations after evaluating and determining that the IDEA, as amended, and its implementing regulations are consistent with the following principles:
(a) Ensuring that all children who have disabilities are afforded a free and appropriate public education that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepare them for further education, employment, and independent living;
(b) Ensuring that the rights of children who have disabilities and their parents are protected; and
(c) Assessing and ensuring the effectiveness of efforts to educate children who have disabilities.
(2) The State Board of Education shall adopt rules pursuant to ss. 120.536(1) and 120.54 to implement this section.
History.s. 2, ch. 2009-238.
1003.5715 Parental consent; individual education plan.
(1) The Department of Education shall adopt separate parental consent forms that school districts must use for each of the following actions in a student’s individual education plan (IEP):
(a) Administer to the student an alternate assessment pursuant to s. 1008.22 and provide instruction in the state standards access points curriculum.
(b) Place the student in an exceptional student education center.
(2) In accordance with 34 C.F.R. s. 300.503, each form shall be provided to the parent in the parent’s native language, as defined in 34 C.F.R. s. 300.29, and include the following:
(a) A statement that the parent is a participant of the individual education plan team (IEP Team) and has the right to consent or refuse consent to the actions described in subsection (1). The statement shall include information that the refusal of parental consent means that the school district may not proceed with the actions described in subsection (1) without a school district due process hearing in accordance with 34 C.F.R. ss. 300.507 and 300.508.
(b) A “does consent” box and a signature line.
(c) A “does not consent” box and a signature line.
(d) An informational statement of the benefits and consequences of giving parental consent to the actions described in subsection (1).
(3) A school district may not proceed with the actions described in subsection (1) without parental consent unless the school district documents reasonable efforts to obtain the parent’s consent and the child’s parent has failed to respond or the school district obtains approval through a due process hearing in accordance with 34 C.F.R. ss. 300.507 and 300.508 and resolution of appeals.
(4) Except for a change in placement described in s. 1003.57(1)(h), if a school district determines that there is a need to change an exceptional student’s IEP as it relates to actions described in subsection (1), the school must hold an IEP Team meeting that includes the parent to discuss the reason for the change. The school shall provide written notice of the meeting to the parent at least 10 days before the meeting, indicating the purpose, time, and location of the meeting and who, by title or position, will attend the meeting. The IEP Team meeting requirement may be waived by informed consent of the parent after the parent receives the written notice.
(5) For a change in actions described in subsection (1) in a student’s IEP, the school district may not implement the change without parental consent unless the school district documents reasonable efforts to obtain the parent’s consent and the child’s parent has failed to respond or the school district obtains approval through a due process hearing in accordance with 34 C.F.R. ss. 300.507 and 300.508 and resolution of appeals.
(6) Pursuant to 34 C.F.R. s. 300.518, during the pendency of a due process hearing or appellate proceeding regarding a due process complaint, the student shall remain in his or her current educational assignment while awaiting the decision of any impartial due process hearing or court proceeding, unless the parent and the district school board otherwise agree.
(7) This section does not abrogate any parental right identified in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and its implementing regulations.
(8) The State Board of Education shall adopt rules pursuant to ss. 120.536(1) and 120.54 to implement this section, including, but not limited to, developing parental consent forms.
History.s. 4, ch. 2013-236.
1003.5716 Transition to postsecondary education and career opportunities.All students with disabilities who are 3 years of age to 21 years of age have the right to a free, appropriate public education. As used in this section, the term “IEP” means individual education plan.
(1) To ensure quality planning for a successful transition of a student with a disability to postsecondary education and career opportunities, an IEP team shall begin the process of, and develop an IEP for, identifying the need for transition services before the student with a disability attains the age of 14 years in order for his or her postsecondary goals and career goals to be identified and in place when he or she attains the age of 16 years. This process must include, but is not limited to:
(a) Consideration of the student’s need for instruction in the area of self-determination and self-advocacy to assist the student’s active and effective participation in an IEP meeting; and
(b) Preparation for the student to graduate from high school with a standard high school diploma pursuant to s. 1003.4282 with a Scholar designation unless the parent chooses a Merit designation.
(2) Beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the student attains the age of 16, or younger if determined appropriate by the parent and the IEP team, the IEP must include the following statements that must be updated annually:
(a) A statement of intent to pursue a standard high school diploma and a Scholar or Merit designation, pursuant to s. 1003.4285, as determined by the parent.
(b) A statement of intent to receive a standard high school diploma before the student attains the age of 22 and a description of how the student will fully meet the requirements in s. 1003.428 or s. 1003.4282, as applicable, including, but not limited to, a portfolio pursuant to s. 1003.4282(11)(b) which meets the criteria specified in State Board of Education rule. The IEP must also specify the outcomes and additional benefits expected by the parent and the IEP team at the time of the student’s graduation.
(c) A statement of appropriate measurable long-term postsecondary education and career goals based upon age-appropriate transition assessments related to training, education, employment, and, if appropriate, independent living skills and the transition services, including courses of study needed to assist the student in reaching those goals.
(3) Any change in the IEP for the goals specified in subsection (2) must be approved by the parent and is subject to verification for appropriateness by an independent reviewer selected by the parent as provided in s. 1003.572.
(4) If a participating agency responsible for transition services, other than the school district, fails to provide the transition services described in the IEP, the school district shall reconvene the IEP team to identify alternative strategies to meet the transition objectives for the student that are specified in the IEP. However, this does not relieve any participating agency of the responsibility to provide or pay for any transition service that the agency would otherwise provide to students with disabilities who meet the eligibility criteria of that agency.
History.s. 20, ch. 2014-184.
1003.572 Collaboration of public and private instructional personnel.
(1) As used in this section, the term “private instructional personnel” means:
(a) Individuals certified under s. 393.17 or licensed under chapter 490 or chapter 491 for applied behavior analysis services as defined in ss. 627.6686 and 641.31098.
(b) Speech-language pathologists licensed under s. 468.1185.
(c) Occupational therapists licensed under part III of chapter 468.
(d) Physical therapists licensed under chapter 486.
(e) Psychologists licensed under chapter 490.
(f) Clinical social workers licensed under chapter 491.
(2) The collaboration of public and private instructional personnel shall be designed to enhance but not supplant the school district’s responsibilities under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The school as the local education agency shall provide therapy services to meet the expectations provided in federal law and regulations and state statutes and rules. Collaboration of public and private instructional personnel will work to promote educational progress and assist students in acquiring essential skills, including, but not limited to, readiness for pursuit of higher education goals or employment. Where applicable, public and private instructional personnel shall undertake collaborative programming. Coordination of services and plans between a public school and private instructional personnel is encouraged to avoid duplication or conflicting services or plans.
(3) Private instructional personnel who are hired or contracted by parents to collaborate with public instructional personnel must be permitted to observe the student in the educational setting, collaborate with instructional personnel in the educational setting, and provide services in the educational setting according to the following requirements:
(a) The student’s public instructional personnel and principal consent to the time and place.
(b) The private instructional personnel satisfy the requirements of s. 1012.32 or s. 1012.321.

For the purpose of implementing this subsection, a school district may not impose any requirements beyond those requirements specified in this subsection or charge any fees.

(4) The provision of private instructional personnel by a parent does not constitute a waiver of the student’s or parent’s right to a free and appropriate public education under IDEA.
History.s. 5, ch. 2013-236; s. 21, ch. 2014-184.
1003.573 Use of restraint and seclusion on students with disabilities.
(1) DOCUMENTATION AND REPORTING.
(a) A school shall prepare an incident report within 24 hours after a student is released from restraint or seclusion. If the student’s release occurs on a day before the school closes for the weekend, a holiday, or another reason, the incident report must be completed by the end of the school day on the day the school reopens.
(b) The following must be included in the incident report:
1. The name of the student restrained or secluded.
2. The age, grade, ethnicity, and disability of the student restrained or secluded.
3. The date and time of the event and the duration of the restraint or seclusion.
4. The location at which the restraint or seclusion occurred.
5. A description of the type of restraint used in terms established by the Department of Education.
6. The name of the person using or assisting in the restraint or seclusion of the student.
7. The name of any nonstudent who was present to witness the restraint or seclusion.
8. A description of the incident, including:
a. The context in which the restraint or seclusion occurred.
b. The student’s behavior leading up to and precipitating the decision to use manual or physical restraint or seclusion, including an indication as to why there was an imminent risk of serious injury or death to the student or others.
c. The specific positive behavioral strategies used to prevent and deescalate the behavior.
d. What occurred with the student immediately after the termination of the restraint or seclusion.
e. Any injuries, visible marks, or possible medical emergencies that may have occurred during the restraint or seclusion, documented according to district policies.
f. Evidence of steps taken to notify the student’s parent or guardian.
(c) A school shall notify the parent or guardian of a student each time manual or physical restraint or seclusion is used. Such notification must be in writing and provided before the end of the school day on which the restraint or seclusion occurs. Reasonable efforts must also be taken to notify the parent or guardian by telephone or computer e-mail, or both, and these efforts must be documented. The school shall obtain, and keep in its records, the parent’s or guardian’s signed acknowledgment that he or she was notified of his or her child’s restraint or seclusion.
(d) A school shall also provide the parent or guardian with the completed incident report in writing by mail within 3 school days after a student was manually or physically restrained or secluded. The school shall obtain, and keep in its records, the parent’s or guardian’s signed acknowledgment that he or she received a copy of the incident report.
(2) MONITORING.
(a) Monitoring of the use of manual or physical restraint or seclusion on students shall occur at the classroom, building, district, and state levels.
(b)  Documentation prepared as required in subsection (1) shall be provided to the school principal, the district director of Exceptional Student Education, and the bureau chief of the Bureau of Exceptional Education and Student Services electronically each month that the school is in session.
(c) The department shall maintain aggregate data of incidents of manual or physical restraint and seclusion and disaggregate the data for analysis by county, school, student exceptionality, and other variables, including the type and method of restraint or seclusion used. This information shall be updated monthly.
(d) The department shall establish standards for documenting, reporting, and monitoring the use of manual or physical restraint or mechanical restraint, and occurrences of seclusion. These standards shall be provided to school districts by October 1, 2011.
(3) SCHOOL DISTRICT POLICIES AND PROCEDURES.
(a) Each school district shall develop policies and procedures that are consistent with this section and that govern the following:
1. Incident-reporting procedures.
2. Data collection and monitoring, including when, where, and why students are restrained or secluded; the frequency of occurrences of such restraint or seclusion; and the prone or mechanical restraint that is most used.
3. Monitoring and reporting of data collected.
4. Training programs relating to manual or physical restraint and seclusion.
5. The district’s plan for selecting personnel to be trained.
6. The district’s plan for reducing the use of restraint and seclusion particularly in settings in which it occurs frequently or with students who are restrained repeatedly, and for reducing the use of prone restraint and mechanical restraint. The plan must include a goal for reducing the use of restraint and seclusion and must include activities, skills, and resources needed to achieve that goal. Activities may include, but are not limited to:
a. Additional training in positive behavioral support and crisis management;
b. Parental involvement;
c. Data review;
d. Updates of students’ functional behavioral analysis and positive behavior intervention plans;
e. Additional student evaluations;
f. Debriefing with staff;
g. Use of schoolwide positive behavior support; and
h. Changes to the school environment.
(b) Any revisions to the district’s policies and procedures, which must be prepared as part of its special policies and procedures, must be filed with the bureau chief of the Bureau of Exceptional Education and Student Services no later than January 31, 2012.
(4) PROHIBITED RESTRAINT.School personnel may not use a mechanical restraint or a manual or physical restraint that restricts a student’s breathing.
(5) SECLUSION.School personnel may not close, lock, or physically block a student in a room that is unlit and does not meet the rules of the State Fire Marshal for seclusion time-out rooms.
History.s. 4, ch. 2010-224; s. 23, ch. 2011-175.
1003.575 Assistive technology devices; findings; interagency agreements.Accessibility, utilization, and coordination of appropriate assistive technology devices and services are essential as a young person with disabilities moves from early intervention to preschool, from preschool to school, from one school to another, and from school to employment or independent living. If an individual education plan team makes a recommendation in accordance with State Board of Education rule for a student with a disability, as defined in s. 1003.01(3), to receive an assistive technology assessment, that assessment must be completed within 60 school days after the team’s recommendation. To ensure that an assistive technology device issued to a young person as part of his or her individualized family support plan, individual support plan, or an individual education plan remains with the individual through such transitions, the following agencies shall enter into interagency agreements, as appropriate, to ensure the transaction of assistive technology devices:
(1) The Florida Infants and Toddlers Early Intervention Program in the Division of Children’s Medical Services of the Department of Health.
(2) The Division of Blind Services, the Bureau of Exceptional Education and Student Services, and the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation of the Department of Education.
(3) The Voluntary Prekindergarten Education Program administered by the Department of Education and the Office of Early Learning.

Interagency agreements entered into pursuant to this section shall provide a framework for ensuring that young persons with disabilities and their families, educators, and employers are informed about the utilization and coordination of assistive technology devices and services that may assist in meeting transition needs, and shall establish a mechanism by which a young person or his or her parent may request that an assistive technology device remain with the young person as he or she moves through the continuum from home to school to postschool.

History.s. 1, ch. 2005-188; s. 463, ch. 2011-142; s. 24, ch. 2011-175.
1003.576 Individual education plans for exceptional students.The Department of Education must develop and have an operating electronic IEP system in place for potential statewide use no later than July 1, 2007. The statewide system shall be developed collaboratively with school districts and must include input from school districts currently developing or operating electronic IEP systems.
History.s. 31, ch. 2006-74.
1003.58 Students in residential care facilities.Each district school board shall provide educational programs according to rules of the State Board of Education to students who reside in residential care facilities operated by the Department of Children and Families or the Agency for Persons with Disabilities.
(1) The district school board shall not be charged any rent, maintenance, utilities, or overhead on such facilities. Maintenance, repairs, and remodeling of existing facilities shall be provided by the Department of Children and Families or the Agency for Persons with Disabilities, as appropriate.
(2) If additional facilities are required, the district school board and the Department of Children and Families or the Agency for Persons with Disabilities, as appropriate, shall agree on the appropriate site based on the instructional needs of the students. When the most appropriate site for instruction is on district school board property, a special capital outlay request shall be made by the commissioner in accordance with s. 1013.60. When the most appropriate site is on state property, state capital outlay funds shall be requested by the department or agency in accordance with chapter 216. Any instructional facility to be built on state property shall have educational specifications jointly developed by the school district and the department or agency and approved by the Department of Education. The size of space and occupant design capacity criteria as provided by state board rules shall be used for remodeling or new construction whether facilities are provided on state property or district school board property. The planning of such additional facilities shall incorporate current state deinstitutionalization goals and plans.
(3) The district school board shall have full and complete authority in the matter of the assignment and placement of such students in educational programs. The parent of an exceptional student shall have the same due process rights as are provided under s. 1003.57(1)(c).
(4) The district school board shall have a written agreement with the Department of Children and Families and the Agency for Persons with Disabilities outlining the respective duties and responsibilities of each party.

Notwithstanding the provisions herein, the educational program at the Marianna Sunland Center in Jackson County shall be operated by the Department of Education, either directly or through grants or contractual agreements with other public or duly accredited educational agencies approved by the Department of Education.

History.s. 152, ch. 2002-387; s. 32, ch. 2006-74; s. 68, ch. 2006-227; s. 3, ch. 2009-238; s. 6, ch. 2013-236; s. 370, ch. 2014-19.
PART VI
ACADEMICALLY HIGH-PERFORMING SCHOOL DISTRICTS
1003.621 Academically high-performing school districts.
1003.621 Academically high-performing school districts.It is the intent of the Legislature to recognize and reward school districts that demonstrate the ability to consistently maintain or improve their high-performing status. The purpose of this section is to provide high-performing school districts with flexibility in meeting the specific requirements in statute and rules of the State Board of Education.
(1) ACADEMICALLY HIGH-PERFORMING SCHOOL DISTRICT.
(a) A school district is an academically high-performing school district if it meets the following criteria:
1.a. Earns a grade of “A” under s. 1008.34 for 2 consecutive years; and
b. Has no district-operated school that earns a grade of “F” under s. 1008.34;
2. Complies with all class size requirements in s. 1, Art. IX of the State Constitution and s. 1003.03; and
3. Has no material weaknesses or instances of material noncompliance noted in the annual financial audit conducted pursuant to s. 11.45 or s. 218.39.
(b) Each school district that satisfies the eligibility criteria in this subsection shall be designated by the State Board of Education as an academically high-performing school district. With the exception of the statutes listed in subsection (2), upon designation as an academically high-performing school district, each such district is exempt from the provisions in chapters 1000-1013 which pertain to school districts and rules of the State Board of Education which implement these exempt provisions. This exemption remains in effect during the time of the designation if the district continues to meet all eligibility criteria.
(c) The academically high-performing school district shall retain the designation as a high-performing school district for 3 years, at the end of which time the district may renew the designation if the district meets the requirements in this section. A school district that fails to meet the requirements in this section shall provide written notification to the State Board of Education that the district is no longer eligible to be designated as an academically high-performing school district.
(d) In order to maintain the designation as an academically high-performing school district pursuant to this section, a school district must meet the following requirements:
1. Comply with the provisions of subparagraphs (a)2. and 3.; and
2. Earn a grade of “A” under s. 1008.34 for 2 years within a 3-year period.

However, a district in which a district-operated school earns a grade of “F” under s. 1008.34 during the 3-year period may not continue to be designated as an academically high-performing school district during the remainder of that 3-year period. The district must meet the criteria in paragraph (a) in order to be redesignated as an academically high-performing school district.

(2) COMPLIANCE WITH STATUTES AND RULES.Each academically high-performing school district shall comply with all of the provisions in chapters 1000-1013, and rules of the State Board of Education which implement these provisions, pertaining to the following:
(a) Those statutes pertaining to the provision of services to students with disabilities.
(b) Those statutes pertaining to civil rights, including s. 1000.05, relating to discrimination.
(c) Those statutes pertaining to student health, safety, and welfare.
(d) Those statutes governing the election or compensation of district school board members.
(e) Those statutes pertaining to the student assessment program and the school grading system, including chapter 1008.
(f) Those statutes pertaining to financial matters, including chapter 1010, except that s. 1010.20(3)(a)1., 2., and 3., relating to the required program expenditure levels, are eligible for exemption.
(g) Those statutes pertaining to planning and budgeting, including chapter 1011, except s. 1011.62(9)(d), relating to the requirement for a comprehensive reading plan. A district that is exempt from submitting this plan shall be deemed approved to receive the research-based reading instruction allocation.
1(h) Sections 1012.22(1)(c) and 1012.27(2), relating to public school personnel compensation and salary schedules; s. 1012.34, relating to personnel evaluation procedures and criteria; and ss. 1012.33 and 1012.335, relating to contracts with instructional personnel, staff, supervisors, and school administrators.
(i) Those statutes pertaining to educational facilities, including chapter 1013, except that s. 1013.20, relating to covered walkways for portables, and s. 1013.21, relating to the use of relocatable facilities that exceed 20 years of age, are eligible for exemption.
(j) Those statutes relating to instructional materials, except that s. 1006.37, relating to the requisition of state-adopted materials from the depository under contract with the publisher, and s. 1006.40(3)(a), relating to the use of 50 percent of the instructional materials allocation, shall be eligible for exemption.
(k) This section.
(3) GOVERNING BOARD.The governing board of the academically high-performing school district shall be the duly elected district school board. The district school board shall supervise the academically high-performing school district.
(4) REPORTS.The academically high-performing school district shall submit to the State Board of Education and the Legislature an annual report on December 1 which delineates the performance of the school district relative to the academic performance of students at each grade level in reading, writing, mathematics, science, and any other subject that is included as a part of the statewide assessment program in s. 1008.22. The annual report shall be submitted in a format prescribed by the Department of Education and shall include:
(a) Longitudinal performance of students on statewide, standardized assessments taken under s. 1008.22;
(b) Longitudinal performance of students by grade level and subgroup on statewide, standardized assessments taken under s. 1008.22;
(c) Longitudinal performance regarding efforts to close the achievement gap;
(d)1. Number and percentage of students who take an Advanced Placement Examination; and
2. Longitudinal performance regarding students who take an Advanced Placement Examination by demographic group, specifically by age, gender, race, and Hispanic origin, and by participation in the National School Lunch Program;
(e) Evidence of compliance with subsection (1); and
(f) A description of each waiver and the status of each waiver.
History.s. 1, ch. 2007-194; s. 7, ch. 2011-1; s. 30, ch. 2013-27; s. 4, ch. 2014-23; s. 48, ch. 2014-39.
1Note.Section 17, ch. 2011-1, provides that “[c]hapter 2010-279, Laws of Florida, does not apply to any rulemaking required to administer this act.”